Farmers

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#31
Naughty_Felid said:
That's interesting, as it's well known how common it is for farmers to take their own lives. It would also be interesting to see the difference between diary farmers and arable farmers.
This article (posted above) deals with the issue of suicide.

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/ireland/ ... -1.1939235

Dairy farmers would face the additional risks of attacks by cattle and falling in to or being overcome by fumes from slurry pits.
 
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#32
Safety authorities take steps to stop rising death toll on farms

Farmers who carry children under the age of seven in the cabs of tractors and farm machinery could face prosecution as safety authorities take tough steps to try and stop the rising death toll on farms.

In a year of tragedy on Irish farms, 23 people including children have lost their lives while every year about 2,000 people are injured on farms, making it by far the most dangerous workplace.

In RTÉ’s farming show, Ear to the Ground, Pat Griffin, from the Health and Safety Authority, said hardline measures may be needed to try and stop the loss of life.

“We have looked at the huge number of fatal accidents that have happened over the last 10 years. 176 people have been killed on farms. There are certain issues that are constantly causing fatal accidents and very serious injuries and we are looking at going straight to prosecution on a number of those issues,” he said.

“If a child is carried in the cab of a tractor or any other farm machinery under the age of seven we will go straight to prosecution. If we find a farmer has an open slurry tank and there is risk we may go straight to prosecution. It is not somewhere we want to go but we may have to go there.” ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/fa ... 97610.html
 
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#33
Crop producers and scientists hold deeply different views on climate change and its possible causes, a study by Purdue and Iowa State universities shows.

Associate professor of natural resource social science Linda Prokopy and fellow researchers surveyed 6,795 people in the agricultural sector in 2011-2012 to determine their beliefs about climate change and whether variation in the climate is triggered by human activities, natural causes or an equal combination of both. More than 90 percent of the scientists and climatologists surveyed said they believed climate change was occurring, with more than 50 percent attributing climate change primarily to human activities.

In contrast, 66 percent of corn producers surveyed said they believed climate change was occurring, with 8 percent pinpointing human activities as the main cause. A quarter of producers said they believed climate change was caused mostly by natural shifts in the environment, and 31 percent said there was not enough evidence to determine whether climate change was happening or not.

The survey results highlight the division between scientists and farmers over climate change and the challenges in communicating climate data and trends in non-polarizing ways, Prokopy said. ...

http://phys.org/news/2014-11-farmers-sc ... imate.html
 
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#34
Now I don't hate all farmers but:

How a Nazi SS storm trooper went from being Hitler’s henchman to an Irish farmer

A notorious Nazi, known as “Hitler’s favorite commando” and “the most dangerous man in Europe,” Otto Skorzeny lived a peaceful life in a mansion on a 160-acre farm County Kildare 14 years after the end of World War II.

Not an easy man to miss, Skorzeny stood 6 foot 4 inches tall and weighed 250lbs. And he was known as “Scarface” for a reason. He had a long, distinctive scar on his left cheek. Skorzeny achieved 'fame' during the war for rescuing deposed Italian leader Benito Mussolini from an Italian hilltop fortress.

Skorzeny was depicted in the Irish press as the Third Reich's 'Scarlet Pimpernel,' the tone in newspaper articles was one of admiration rather than repulsion.

"He seemed to be admired for his military prowess," according to the BBC report this week.


Skorzeny was an elite soldier and he traveled the world training military and opportunists in guerrilla warfare techniques after the war. He was a businessman and a one-time bodyguard to Eva Peron. In 1957 he was greeted as a celebrity in Ireland and became, for all intents and purposes, a gentleman farmer with a large estate in The Curragh in County Kildare. ...

http://www.irishcentral.com/roots/h...eing-Hitlers-henchman-to-an-Irish-farmer.html
 

Spudrick68

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#35
Am I the only person to be appalled at Eira thought that they should accept/celebrate this person in the community. Anti English should not have equalled the genocide of 6 million Jews ,blacks, homosexuals, gypsies and anyone else who offended. Perhaps I am missing something here but its hardly anything to shout about.
 
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#36
Am I the only person to be appalled at Eira thought that they should accept/celebrate this person in the community. Anti English should not have equalled the genocide of 6 million Jews ,blacks, homosexuals, gypsies and anyone else who offended. Perhaps I am missing something here but its hardly anything to shout about.
Indeed but Skorzeny was not regarded as a war criminal by many British Officers, especially those in Special Forces. When he was tried as a war criminal several officers, including Wing Commander Yeo-Thomas of the SOE testified that they had carried out similar actions to Skorzeny including wearing German uniforms (Skorzeny had worn US uniforms) when fighting.

In spite of being a civil engineer Skorzeny was not made an officer until 1941 because he was politically suspect. During the Anschluss on 12 March 1938, he saved the Austrian President Wilhelm Miklas from being shot by Austrian Nazis (the attempt on the presidents life may have been unauthorised). He also employed former socialists and communists in a factory he ran.

All in all, a warrior rather than a war criminal.

His British/Irish equivalent may have been Blair Mayne.
 

rynner2

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#37
Skorzeny achieved 'fame' during the war for rescuing deposed Italian leader Benito Mussolini from an Italian hilltop fortress.
Coincidentally, yesterday a TV channel here showed "The Eagle has Landed": according to the book the film was based on, Hitler's idea of a raid to capture Churchill in WWII was based on the rescue of Mussolini.
 
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#38
Coincidentally, yesterday a TV channel here showed "The Eagle has Landed": according to the book the film was based on, Hitler's idea of a raid to capture Churchill in WWII was based on the rescue of Mussolini.
Great book and great adventure film. Liam Devlin (played by Donald Sutherland) was based on an amalgam of Frank Ryan and Francis Stuart.
 

Frideswide

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#39
I was working as an archaeologist and we were all under canvas. One of my friends, at c03.00, shook my ridgeple vigorously and announced that the eagle has landed. This was meant to indicate that she had persuaded the dig heart throb into bed but I took it to mean she had developed an interest in birdwatching....
 
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#43
A real swine.

A farmer was jailed yesterday after a judge labelled him “an absolute disgrace” for failing to prevent an environmental timebomb from threatening lakes in the Midlands.

Donal Connaughton, aged 55, acted “in a blackguardly fashion” and expected the authorities to clean up the environmental nightmare he had created at his pig farm in Co Longford, Judge Seamus Hughes said.

Connaughton, of Elfleet, Newtowncashel, was convicted at Longford District Court of causing or permitting effluent to fall from massive tanks containing 4m gallons of slurry into a local lake last March.

The prosecution was taken by Inland Fisheries Ireland. Connaughton was jailed for 10 weeks and fined €3,000, with €5,400 costs.

Up to 25 tanks — located above and below ground — are located at the pig farm, which covers 8,000sq m. Many of the tanks were unauthorised structures and Connaughton had exacerbated the situation by only removing the roofs in response to a demolition order previously granted to Longford County Council, the court heard. This caused the slurry and soiled water to overflow from the yard into local water courses. ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/pig-farmer-jailed-over-leaks-in-slurry-pits-306759.html
 
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#48
Farmers will be asked to help each other to boost safety on their land, with the Health and Safety Authority admitting it is “clutching at straws” in its efforts to reduce serious accidents.

With 2014 the worst year for farm deaths in more than two decades, the HSA said it would be cutting the number of inspections and instead working on developing countrywide discussion groups with the hope of creating “a sustained change” in how farmers maintain high safety levels.

Pat Griffin, senior inspector within the HSA, said there would be 700 fewer farm inspections this year but that the resources would instead be diverted to more practical ways of enhancing safety on farms around the country.

“With the best will in the world we are never going to have enough inspectors to do one [inspection] per farmer per year. We need to change the mindset.”

Teasgasc’s national health and safety officer, John McNamara, and dairy expert George Ramsbottom will now meet with HSA inspectors at the end of the month to develop a pilot project involving the setting up of 50 knowledge transfer groups around the country in which small clusters of farmers will effectively monitor each other’s safety efforts. ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/hsa-farmers-need-to-change-mindset-on-safety-308548.html
 
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#49
What Do Farmers Think about Climate Change?
Most farmers believe climate change is occurring but do not trust those who clamor for action

As a sociologist, J. Gordon Arbuckle Jr. spends a lot of time studying what shapes farmers' views and responses to climate change. It's a subject that has not gotten much attention, even as more research focuses on how to reduce agricultural greenhouse gas emissions and how to make farming more resilient to the impacts of extreme weather.

"Our research so far has shown pretty clearly that although most farmers believe that climate change is occurring, a minority attribute it to human activity," said Arbuckle, an associate sociology professor at Iowa State University.

Arbuckle's research is not just a matter of academic interest. Previous studies have found that belief in climate change is linked to more support for climate change actions. Getting a better sense of farmers' views on climate change will also help researchers develop ways to protect food security over the long term.

In 2011, Arbuckle and his colleagues used the annual Iowa Farm and Rural Life Poll to survey over 1,200 farmers in the state about their views on the subject.

Only 10.4 percent of participants agreed with the statement, "climate change is occurring and it is caused mostly by human activities."

The highest number of respondents, 35 percent, said climate change was caused about equally by natural changes in the environment and human causes. Just under a quarter (23 percent) said climate change was mostly caused by natural changes, 27 percent said there was not sufficient evidence, and 4.6 percent said climate change was not occurring. ...

http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-do-farmers-think-about-climate-change/
 
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#51
Strewth! Vid at link.

An Australian farmer took her Australia Day celebrations to unprecedented levels on Monday when she created her own version of the Australian flag using only sheep.

Hannah Marriott, who owns a farm in Kalkallo, Victoria, managed to herd her flock of 1030 sheep into the design of the country’s famous red, blue and white flag by using a tractor to carefully place sheep-feed.

According to the Marriott, she had carefully planned the route beforehand and used barley and lupine to attract the sheep to their places. ...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/w...ing-giant-flag-using-only-sheep-10006137.html
 
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#52
Defendant failed to treat or euthanise a pig after it was left in pen to be eaten alive

The owner of a Mitchelstown pig farm pleaded guilty yesterday to cruelty and neglect in relation to animals, including one count of an animal being left in a pen to be eaten alive. ...

The five charges to which Mr O’Brien pleaded guilty were, as follows:

1. That he did between May 3 and Sept 8, 2011, at Killicane, Mitchelstown, fail to take the necessary steps to ensure the welfare of pigs in his possession or under his control and that he failed to ensure the animals were not caused unnecessary suffering or injury by failing to treat or euthanise them.

2. That at the same place during the period June 7 to 10, 2011 he failed to comply with a welfare notice dated June 7, 2011, relating to animals in his possession or under his control or care.

3. That on May 9, 2011, he caused unnecessary suffering to a pig by failing to treat or euthanise it after its flesh was extensively eaten on its ribcage. ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/irelan...ads-guilty-to-cruelty-and-neglect-310743.html
 

Krepostnoi

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#55
I know that copyright issues would seem to fit better in the Wall of Text thread - I certainly wouldn't have expected that proprietory software and the DCMA would be an issue for farmers, but this article makes clear that farmers are increasingly unable to fix the machinery they own themselves for this reason. Indeed, in the USA, they risk prosecution if they even try :eek: As a result, older, simpler machinery is in greater demand.

The family farmer who owns this tractor is a friend of mine. He just wanted a better way to fix a minor hydraulic sensor. Every time the sensor blew, the onboard computer would shut the tractor down. It takes a technician at least two days to order the part, get out to the farm, and swap out the sensor. So for two days, Dave’s tractor lies fallow. And so do his fields.

Dave asked me if there was some way to bypass a bum sensor while waiting for the repairman to show up. But fixing Dave’s sensor problem required fiddling around in the tractor’s highly proprietary computer system—the tractor’s engine control unit (tECU): the brains behind the agricultural beast.

One hour later, I hopped back out of the cab of the tractor. Defeated. I was unable to breach the wall of proprietary defenses that protected the tECU like a fortress. I couldn’t even connect to the computer. Because John Deere says I can’t.
 

rynner2

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#56
Defendant failed to treat or euthanise a pig after it was left in pen to be eaten alive

The owner of a Mitchelstown pig farm pleaded guilty yesterday to cruelty and neglect in relation to animals, including one count of an animal being left in a pen to be eaten alive.

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/cork-pig-farmer-pleads-guilty-to-cruelty-and-neglect-310743.html
It's not just farmers that behave this way...
Rare warty pigs are lost when male eats his entire family at Bristol zoo
Incident involving the critically endangered animals happened shortly before a rare monkey was eaten by otters and three lorikeets escaped :eek:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/new...le-eats-his-entire-family-at-Bristol-zoo.html
 
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#57
Two farmers have been voted the sexiest in Britain in a competition run by a weekly magazine.

Lizi Clubley, 27, who works on a farm near Skirlaugh in Yorkshire, said the best thing about winning was getting two pairs of boots as a prize.

George Grant, 20, who farms with his father near Market Rasen in Lincolnshire, said he was surprised to win after his girlfriend nominated him. ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-lincolnshire-31451615
 
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#58
“We’re actually kinda really terrible at guessing what the future is going to be like,” says Kaitlyn Schwalje. Schwalje is a recent graduate of the Copenhagen Institute of Interaction Design who, for her graduating thesis project, is making her own best guess at the future by envisioning what farming might be like a century down the road. In Three Propositions for Future Farming, Schwalje designed objects to explore three scenarios for what farming might be like in 2115, when bioterrorism and weather manipulation are commonplace. ...

The Precision Weather Modification Device will target specific locations with precipitation.

Aurel Insecticide is an omni-directional speaker that pipes out vibrations in order to stimulate plant defenses.

Bioterrorists will use the Gene Gun Hack to inject invasion weed species into crops, systematically destroying a field.

http://www.wired.com/2015/02/three-sci-fi-designs-future-farming/

I reckon farmers will continue to depend on scarecrows, dogs and shotguns as well.
 
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#59
A pig farmer, who built a “monster” piggery without planning permission, has been given three months to work out a plan to prevent the development from becoming an environmental disaster.

Donal Connaughton admitted to Longford Circuit Court that he had been driven by greed and failed to abide by the planning regulations in developing the farm which at one stage housed 14,000 pigs. Connaughton, aged 55, of Elfleet, Newtowncashel, Co Longford, was convicted at Longford District Court last month of causing or permitting effluent from massive tanks, containing 4m gallons of slurry, at the now-derelict pig farm, to fall into a local lake in March of last year.

The prosecution was taken by Inland Fisheries Ireland and Connaughton was given a sentence of 10 weeks in prison and fined €3,000 with €5,400 costs. He appealed the sentence to the Circuit Court. ...

http://www.irishexaminer.com/ireland/farmer-given-three-months-to-get-rid-of-piggery-313811.html
 
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#60
The quote at the end of the article:
Like any pub, Butterfield’s has photographs of great moments from times past, including a splendid black and white of six men, all wearing cloth caps, seated at the bar in 1963.

And they’re all dead?’ I ask.

They’re not all dead!’, hollers a cloth-capped old man at the corner of the bar and everyone laughs. Dan Mackey has been a patron of Butterfields for as far back as anyone can recall. He was a farm labourer all his life, working in an age when there was ‘nothing only a spade and fork and no hydraulics at all’. He enjoyed the farming life. ‘When you got home, you hadn’t a care only that you could get something to eat. You’re better off than the people now with their mortgages and two cars. Unless you had nothing to eat!’ Dan is of the view that life goes full circle. ‘The farmer will be back’, he says. ‘You might call me mad but I’m telling you now, the wheel will keep turning and the horse and cart will be back’.
http://www.turtlebunbury.com/publis...s/irishpubs/rural/pub_books_butterfields.html
 
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