Fashion (Clothing; Attire): Foibles, Follies, Fads & Social Norms

PeteS

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#1
Funnily enough I've noticed a large number of follicle challenged gentlemen wearing large black framed glasses recently. Is it some form of fashion statement, like the twenty and thirty something blokes wearing skinny blue suits, brown pointy shoes, and stubble?
 

Mythopoeika

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#3
Why do some men insist on wearing blue and brown together? Are they color blind? :ranting:
It might be a 'nerd statement'.
It's an odd thing. Many men, as soon as they turn into adults, go from liking bright colours to liking dull, monochromatic stuff.
Maybe they feel it's 'expected of them' or maybe they genuinely like dull ol' colours? Who knows? Is it a change brought on by the action of testosterone on the brain?
 

Swifty

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#4
Why do some men insist on wearing blue and brown together? Are they color blind? :ranting:
fun fact .. Sam Raimi, director of The Evil Dead dressed Ash in a blue shirt and brown trousers because he felt that specific colour combination would be timeless ..


aash04.jpg

aash05.png
 

Sollywos

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#5
Why do some men insist on wearing blue and brown together? Are they color blind? :ranting:
Um um um .. er er can't see anything wrong with it myself. No I'm not colour blind. :) I remember being told in dressmaking classes that 'blue and green should never be seen' who came up with that one?
I 'spose I aught to get dressed instead of sitting around reading this forum, ... oh decision decisions should I wear the brown or the green jeans with the blue t shirt?

Sollywos x
 

EnolaGaia

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#7
Why do some men insist on wearing blue and brown together? Are they color blind? :ranting:
I've never understood why some people (invariably women, in my experience ... ) challenge the combination of blue and brown for men's attire. Brown is the relatively neutral color or tone closest to blue's chromatic opposite (orange), so brown / blue is a conservative way to assemble a scheme emphasizing overall contrast or exploiting contrast to highlight one or more items in the ensemble.

Another relevant point is that men have a longer history of dressing themselves unencumbered by the walking bondage of socially-prescribed fashion (or, as I prefer, fascion - as in "fascism" ... ) prescriptions, and brown is admittedly a color that seems to connote "casual."

This casual theme is influential because certain casual or casual-style items are most often available only in blue or brown. For example, consider the two most ubiquitous categories of men's casual pants - jeans (overwhelmingly blue) and chinos / "khakis" (overwhelmingly tan-ish or brown-ish).

Finally, I have to point out that whatever rule there is prohibiting blue / brown combinations (except for shoes in formal attire) isn't evident in men's fashion advice (as if I give a damn about that ...). Indeed, the blue / brown combo is promoted for men's fashion. See, for example:

https://www.gq.com/gallery/brown-blue-shirts-ties-combinations
https://www.gentlemansgazette.com/matching-colors-for-men/
 

Sollywos

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#8
I hate fashion with a passion so now I'll start calling it fascion ... good word sums it up nicely.

It wasn't that long ago that upper class men were just as constrained by the expectations of fashion as women. I'm thinking of Tudor and Georgian mainly. Not to mention that in historical times commoners weren't allowed to wear certain colours as they were deemed Royal colours, can't have the plebs getting above their station now can we. Mind you cost would have been an issue as well so I don't suppose it bothered them right a lot. Ah it's all status signalling can't be doing with it meself.

Wear what is comfortable, and fun for you and to hell with the fascion mags.

Sollywos x
 

Mythopoeika

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#14

EnolaGaia

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#17
... the saggy, shapeless dress that everyone is wearing this summer. it suits no-one at all in equal ugliness, and covers up all manner of body quirks in the same made-from-old-curtains fashion.
i want it.
It looks so 19th century!
If you were born and raised in the rural south (as I was) it was still common wear among older women in the mid 20th century. My grandmothers (both matrons of self-sufficient farms) wore such frocks their entire lives, and as a child and teen I saw it every Sunday as the standard uniform of the venerable church ladies.

It's as eminently practical as overalls and as comfortable for warm weather wear as the more flamboyantly colorful muumuu.
 

Shady

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#18
I kinda like the Laura Ashley one
As for brown and blue together, they can go really nice if you get the right shade of each colour, I never followed conventions when it came to clothes, altho when i was younger I dressed like Sandy in Grease, both versions, I dressed in what I wanted to wear. Too many people get obsessed by fashion.
 

Ermintruder

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#28
I'm still waiting for the 'Miami Vice' look to return. Those were the days.
The male leads' jackets, whites and pastels, with crumpled up-pulled sleeves (never folded or rolled, always pseudocasual) and shiny slubs, were copied into a highly-marketed uniform for the masses. Women's shoulder-pads, scalloped boobs, and plunging necklines, also became 80s standard.

I've never understood why some people (invariably women, in my experience ... ) challenge the combination of blue and brown for men's attire.
This is still viewed as edgy, non-conformist businesswear, in many UK settings, hence has become something of a sub-tribal signature suit. The traditional sartorial saying "never brown in town" has become entirely sidelined, although its bedfellow "never tweed on the street" may still have a number of adherents (calculated or coincidental I know not)


Many men, as soon as they turn into adults, go from liking bright colours to liking dull, monochromatic stuff
Many men/people work in settings where sub fusc is not only an expectation, it is still effectively the only combination that is permitted. I've spent much of my work life in dark shades (as opposed to any colours) and only now am I starting to become dangerously rebellious in the workplace. The system will win, though, of that I have no doubt


Maybe they feel it's 'expected of them' or maybe they genuinely like dull ol' colours?
This is definitely an effect with older men (most, thereof). An adoption of beige is a scary characteristic that many older 60+ western males seem to slide into, something I call the Victor Meldrew Look. Whilst I certainly become grumpier as I age, I would never deliberately-aim to become a beige/tan flat-capped semi-animated corpse*. The clothing colour/color pallette for 60+ women is also remarkably-limited....there must be a PhD thesis awaiting embodiment, entitled "Chromopsychopathology: Aging and Fashion"

*chinos appear not to count
 
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Ulalume

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#29
If you were born and raised in the rural south (as I was) it was still common wear among older women in the mid 20th century. My grandmothers (both matrons of self-sufficient farms) wore such frocks their entire lives, and as a child and teen I saw it every Sunday as the standard uniform of the venerable church ladies.

It's as eminently practical as overalls and as comfortable for warm weather wear as the more flamboyantly colorful muumuu.
True, and I wouldn't be caught dead in it. :p
 
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