"Flavours" That Don't Taste Like The Actual Thing

Mythopoeika

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#91
I like Cherry Coke but can never find it. I like Dr Pepper too, which is like fizzy marzipan. But I only have one fizzy drink a week, otherwise I drink coffee and fruit juice. Grape juice is unbelievably sweet anyway, don't know why you need to add it to carbonated sugar water.
Probably because of the packaging. The bottle has Cherry Coke in small writing.
 

Shady

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#92
@Ladyloafer I hate aniseed lol

I've tried some of that fake meat aimed at vegetarians. While it tastes good, it doesn't taste like meat.
Thank the lord for that, i hate the taste of meat, I love the vegetarian beef slice, quiet yummy
There's a Quorn Roast that is quite similar to turkey but generally, no, they don't taste like meat.
I hated the quorn roast
 

Shady

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#93
Doe's anyone know where you can get Caffeine free Dr Pepper, I do not want to buy it online, at the mo I am using caffeine free coke with a splash of Disaronno, tastes just like Dr Pepper
 
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#94
I like Dr Pepper too, which is like fizzy marzipan.
No, it's like fizzy Benylin. Stop getting Partridge wrong!

I was bought a Dr Pepper at a McDonald's when I was about nine and didn't care for it at all. I don't even know what's in it - sarsaparilla or summat? Awful stuff. You're better off which our beautiful British dandelion and burdock.

Irun Bru is now an avenue of pleasure which has been closed to me. Had one last year for a treat and it tasted all wrong - an oversweetened mish-mash of citrus flavours that don't go together. Suspecting this was simply due to my developing a more refined palate I checked online and sure enough they (Barr) had recently changed the recipe, substituting nutritious health-giving sugar for artificial stuff and generally buggering it up.

This article (no doubt sponsored by the manufacturer) insists that no one can tell the difference. It is wrong.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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#95
I got a taste for Dr Pepper when I went to Florida, when I was a teenager. The restaurants served bottomless refills which was a revelation, and I developed a slight addiction.

Also, I got to see some episodes of Star Trek TNG years before any of my mates. And a record shop I went into had the entire Dead Kennedys back catalogue on CD which was not easily available in the West Mids.

I mean, I did NASA and Universal and everything but they were the highlights.
 
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JamesWhitehead

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#96
The banana-flavour issue is featured in this video by a maker of traditional candy. Well worth viewing for the skills involved!

I tend to think that almost any thing mixed with another is transformed, quite apart from manufacturers faking stuff. Take rum. As a budding dypsomaniac child, I loved the flavour in rum babas or with raisins in chocolate and ice-cream. Getting to taste the spirit for real was a disappointment. Yet you could use authentic rum in sauces, syrups etc. and get something of the nostalgic flavour of childhood.

Bananas in custard were never quite like bananas eaten from the skin.

Then there is simple preservation. My mother, a child during WWII, retained an unholy affection for tinned peaches and pears - also for tinned cream! An abomination to those who came after. Oddly, she would have known fresh pears.

I have a very vivid and nostalgic memory of the artificial raspberry flavour of ices in the 1960s. Now and then, I detect something like it but the luxury of the fresh berries cannot supply it. Probably it was something poisonous and banished! :hunger:
 

Mythopoeika

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#97
I have a very vivid and nostalgic memory of the artificial raspberry flavour of ices in the 1960s. Now and then, I detect something like it but the luxury of the fresh berries cannot supply it. Probably it was something poisonous and banished! :hunger:
I remember visits as a young child to my grandparents in South Wales. In the town (Blaenavon) there was a long-established Italian ice cream shop. The kindly old fellow in there would insist on putting on lots of raspberry syrup. It was one of the best ice creams that I have ever had.
Nothing like it now.
 

Ogdred Weary

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#98
I remember visits as a young child to my grandparents in South Wales. In the town (Blaenavon) there was a long-established Italian ice cream shop. The kindly old fellow in there would insist on putting on lots of raspberry syrup. It was one of the best ice creams that I have ever had.
Nothing like it now.
 

Ladyloafer

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#99
The banana-flavour issue is featured in this video by a maker of traditional candy. Well worth viewing for the skills involved!

I tend to think that almost any thing mixed with another is transformed, quite apart from manufacturers faking stuff. Take rum. As a budding dypsomaniac child, I loved the flavour in rum babas or with raisins in chocolate and ice-cream. Getting to taste the spirit for real was a disappointment. Yet you could use authentic rum in sauces, syrups etc. and get something of the nostalgic flavour of childhood.

Bananas in custard were never quite like bananas eaten from the skin.

Then there is simple preservation. My mother, a child during WWII, retained an unholy affection for tinned peaches and pears - also for tinned cream! An abomination to those who came after. Oddly, she would have known fresh pears.

I have a very vivid and nostalgic memory of the artificial raspberry flavour of ices in the 1960s. Now and then, I detect something like it but the luxury of the fresh berries cannot supply it. Probably it was something poisonous and banished! :hunger:
As someone born in the 70s I love tinned peaches and tinned cream. Although not as much as tinned mandarins and evaporated milk. Mmm.
 

Ladyloafer

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OneWingedBird

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As someone born in the 70s I love tinned peaches and tinned cream. Although not as much as tinned mandarins and evaporated milk. Mmm.
I absolutely adored Golden Nuggets when they were around in the early 70s.

Think they got banned or something for being full of tartrazine. Relaunched a few years ago and are kind of ok but not the same, also I tend to boycott nestle so won't generally buy them anyway.

The dreadfully named Asda ripoff Golden Balls are to be avoided, they really are nasty.
 

James_H

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Has the rumour (fact?) been brought up that crisp flavours are named after they are invented – i.e. they'll concoct a particular mixture of powdered flavourings then sit around trying to guess what it tastes most like, then label the product as that?
 

Ladyloafer

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Has the rumour (fact?) been brought up that crisp flavours are named after they are invented – i.e. they'll concoct a particular mixture of powdered flavourings then sit around trying to guess what it tastes most like, then label the product as that?
While you'd think so, it probably is actually the other way around. Flavours of crisps are based on trends, Someone says' hey prosseco [spelling? spellcheck is not helping] is really in at the moment, lets do a prosecco crisp'.

My cousin used to work for a company that used to invent new foods. The client say, Birds Eye, would go to them and say 'hey, we want chilli chocolate chicken' and the company would figure out how to do it. My cousins job was the actual making the recipes- out of ingredients that could be mass produced- so a sprinkle of msg, and dash of e numbers and so on.

How successful these recipes were I don't know? I wouldn't be surprised if other things were invented by accident.
 

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Any Scottish football afficiendos, will have been brought up on the prerequisit, half-time, pie and Bovril.

Bovril, in its treacle-like essence from a jar, never tasted the same.

Brilliant you can now buy ten packs of preprepared Bovril powder, in plastic cups - that's the real McCoy.
 

Bad Bungle

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Has the rumour (fact?) been brought up that crisp flavours are named after they are invented – i.e. they'll concoct a particular mixture of powdered flavourings then sit around trying to guess what it tastes most like, then label the product as that?
Reply

Walker did two 'Do us a flavour' campaigns (~2008 & 2014) asking the Public what flavour crisps they would like to see (I think the respective winners were Cajun Squirrel and Pulled Pork in BBQ sauce). But I entered a competition only a few years ago where the crisp was released first without a description and the Public were invited to say what flavour it most reminded them of. It was just a musty MSG /antioxidant taste and my suggestion of 'Old lady's cupboard' wasn't a winner.
 

Shady

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:rofl2::rofl2::rofl2: It should have been
 

Dinobot

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Walker did two 'Do us a flavour' campaigns (~2008 & 2014) asking the Public what flavour crisps they would like to see (I think the respective winners were Cajun Squirrel and Pulled Pork in BBQ sauce). But I entered a competition only a few years ago where the crisp was released first without a description and the Public were invited to say what flavour it most reminded them of. It was just a musty MSG /antioxidant taste and my suggestion of 'Old lady's cupboard' wasn't a winner.
Is that an euphemism?
 

Recycled1

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Going in the opposite direction - I've got tiny alpine strawberries growing in my garden, and when properly ripe they taste like artificial strawberry sweets, rather than conventional strawberries. Delicious, but the snails try to get them first!
 

GNC

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Going in the opposite direction - I've got tiny alpine strawberries growing in my garden, and when properly ripe they taste like artificial strawberry sweets, rather than conventional strawberries. Delicious, but the snails try to get them first!
Not been a good year for strawberries with the weather being what it is, so you could go into business and make your fortune if yours are thriving.
 

ChasFink

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Just discovered this thread, so forgive my long-windedness.
For many things it's probably cheaper to synthesize something close to the flavour than to synthesize the exact flavour. Fake lemon flavour is the worst.
As some have observed above, artificial flavors are often a simplified version of the combination of chemicals in the natural flavor. I'm always surprised when people who should know better seem to prefer the artificial.

After hearing many food experts tout the superiority of the Meyer lemon, I decided to buy some. They had none of the complex spiciness and earthiness of a "regular" lemon. They're somewhat sweeter (or are they just less acidic?) and the taste was extremely flat - in other words they taste a lot like artificial lemon flavor.

Similarly, I tend to dislike foods made with artificial vanilla flavorings. Yet in a show about vanilla, TV foodie Alton Brown (who I used to call "the anal retentive chef" because of his insistence on doing things the "right" way) said that you should save your money and buy artificial vanilla extract, because the vanillin it's made from is the most prominent of the many compounds in true vanilla. So the other compounds don't matter?

Re: almonds. I had some cashew liquor a few months ago and it tasted exactly like amaretto, so the same process has a similar effect on at least one other type of nut.
Just to add to the confusion, amaretto is actually often made from apricot or peach stones. That's right, artificial almond flavor.

Is it just me or does 'reassuringly expensive' Stella Artois instead taste of cheap metal that's still being electroplated ? .. it most certainly doesn't taste of beer .. 'wife beater' effect observations aside on the people who drink it ? ..
Only seen it in bottles in the US.....it's liked by both my daughters...so it must be popular with young women these days..?
View attachment 15414
The Stella in America isn't that bad. It certainly tastes better than most mass-marketed American beers. Could it be a different formula than what's available in the U.K.? I've heard that Gordon's gin is better tasting (but now much weaker) in the U.K. compared with the U.S.
 

stu neville

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I've heard that Gordon's gin is better tasting (but now much weaker) in the U.K. compared with the U.S.
Most spirits in the UK are "governed down" to 40% by volume. You can get the export strength though, around 45-50%, which is closer to what you get Stateside. It's not that stronger stuff is banned - you can get 75% rum or vodka relatively easily- but 40% is the standard pub and supermarket strength.
 
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