Folk Horror

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
53,450
Reaction score
30,963
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Sounds like an interesting collection.

THE LETTERS OF SHIRLEY JACKSON
Edited by Laurence Jackson Hyman in consultation with Bernice M. Murphy

The two most revealing documents in this hefty collection of unpublished letters written by the novelist Shirley Jackson were never sent. One was addressed to her mother, and the other to her husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman. Both were written not long before Jackson died in her sleep in 1965, at the age of 48. A third important but technically unsent letter included in this volume wouldn’t have even required postage: Jackson wrote it to herself, possibly sometime in 1963. “One world is writing and one is not,” she observed, “and from the one which is not, it is not possible to understand the one which is.”

Many writers feel that the self who writes exists in a partially unknowable state, separate from the self who goes about her worldly business, talking with friends and colleagues, cooking dinner, ferrying her children around. With Jackson, the division seems especially vivid, and also tripartite, an impression that this collection, edited by her son Laurence Jackson Hyman, solidifies. She had not one but two authorial identities, and they appeared to be polar opposites. Early in her career, Jackson wrote linked, semi-fictionalized accounts of raising her four rambunctious children in the small town of North Bennington, Vt., and sold them for tidy sums to women’s magazines. The publication of these genuinely delightful, humorous pieces in a 1953 collection, “Life Among the Savages,” proved equally successful. Another book, “Raising Demons,” followed in 1957, and the income Jackson earned from her pen often outpaced Hyman’s as a staff writer for The New Yorker and a professor at Bennington College.

At the same time Jackson also regularly published more sinister, enigmatic short fiction in general-interest magazines; her most famous story, “The Lottery,” appeared in The New Yorker in 1948 and generated more reader mail than any work of fiction the magazine had ever published. Also set in a small town much like North Bennington, “The Lottery” has, in print and dramatic form, transfixed and perplexed generations of readers with its depiction of a banal rural morning that segues into ritual human sacrifice. In contrast to the bemused mom she wrote about for the women’s magazines, presiding over a house packed with kids, cats, friends and chaos, the rest of Jackson’s fictional heroines tend to be fragile, isolated girls on the brink of unraveling. Her 1954 novel, “The Bird’s Nest,” features a young woman with dissociative identity disorder, the narration including the points of view of her alternate personalities. Any hope that Jackson’s private writing might convey a more unified sense of self seems quixotic. According to her biographer, Ruth Franklin, even as a teenager Jackson “kept multiple diaries simultaneously, each with a different purpose.” ...

In researching her biography, Franklin discovered a cache of letters Jackson wrote to a fan named Jeanne Beatty, whose taste in books she shared. The two never met. It’s only in reading these letters, written between 1959 and 1963, that it becomes evident how lonely Jackson was. Her confessions and enthusiasms come gushing forth as if she were a teenager who had finally, finally found a best friend. She explains to Jeanne her struggles to craft a “sustained taut style full of images and all kinds of double meanings.” At times, these letters relax into something like stream of consciousness, her habitual lowercase prose flowing from household noises to Jackson’s protean plans for “We Have Always Lived in the Castle”: “oo let us make a orchestra cries david you bang on the wastebasket. her name is jenny. she lives with her sister constance in a big old brown house saturated with family memories and her husband lives there too; they have been married for seven years and her sister constance still calls him mr harrap. they are going to kill him because he is a boor i think.” ...

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/11/...son-hyman-the-letters-of-shirley-jackson.html
 

CarlosTheDJ

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 1, 2007
Messages
6,894
Reaction score
8,986
Points
299
Location
Pebble Mill
We've decided it's high time we properly investigated the work of Ben Wheatley, starting at the beginning.

Down Terrace was first up, I had no idea what to expect but I really enjoyed it. Bonus points for it being set in Brighton and the local references such as 'trouble in Whitehawk' really added a little something for us adopted locals. The first flat I had in Brighton was a stone's throw from the real Down Terrace.

Last Saturday we watched the second instalment, Kill List. Brilliant stuff with incredible performances. Loved it.

Sightseers next.
 

hunck

Antediluvian
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,713
Reaction score
10,641
Points
299
Location
Hobbs End
We've decided it's high time we properly investigated the work of Ben Wheatley, starting at the beginning.

Down Terrace was first up, I had no idea what to expect but I really enjoyed it. Bonus points for it being set in Brighton and the local references such as 'trouble in Whitehawk' really added a little something for us adopted locals. The first flat I had in Brighton was a stone's throw from the real Down Terrace.

Last Saturday we watched the second instalment, Kill List. Brilliant stuff with incredible performances. Loved it.

Sightseers next.

Sightseers is great - darkly hilarious. Will look out for the others on your recommendation. I've seen High Rise & A Field in England - both worth a watch.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
53,450
Reaction score
30,963
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Sounds like an interesting collection.

THE LETTERS OF SHIRLEY JACKSON
Edited by Laurence Jackson Hyman in consultation with Bernice M. Murphy

The two most revealing documents in this hefty collection of unpublished letters written by the novelist Shirley Jackson were never sent. One was addressed to her mother, and the other to her husband, Stanley Edgar Hyman. Both were written not long before Jackson died in her sleep in 1965, at the age of 48. A third important but technically unsent letter included in this volume wouldn’t have even required postage: Jackson wrote it to herself, possibly sometime in 1963. “One world is writing and one is not,” she observed, “and from the one which is not, it is not possible to understand the one which is.”

Many writers feel that the self who writes exists in a partially unknowable state, separate from the self who goes about her worldly business, talking with friends and colleagues, cooking dinner, ferrying her children around. With Jackson, the division seems especially vivid, and also tripartite, an impression that this collection, edited by her son Laurence Jackson Hyman, solidifies. She had not one but two authorial identities, and they appeared to be polar opposites. Early in her career, Jackson wrote linked, semi-fictionalized accounts of raising her four rambunctious children in the small town of North Bennington, Vt., and sold them for tidy sums to women’s magazines. The publication of these genuinely delightful, humorous pieces in a 1953 collection, “Life Among the Savages,” proved equally successful. Another book, “Raising Demons,” followed in 1957, and the income Jackson earned from her pen often outpaced Hyman’s as a staff writer for The New Yorker and a professor at Bennington College.

At the same time Jackson also regularly published more sinister, enigmatic short fiction in general-interest magazines; her most famous story, “The Lottery,” appeared in The New Yorker in 1948 and generated more reader mail than any work of fiction the magazine had ever published. Also set in a small town much like North Bennington, “The Lottery” has, in print and dramatic form, transfixed and perplexed generations of readers with its depiction of a banal rural morning that segues into ritual human sacrifice. In contrast to the bemused mom she wrote about for the women’s magazines, presiding over a house packed with kids, cats, friends and chaos, the rest of Jackson’s fictional heroines tend to be fragile, isolated girls on the brink of unraveling. Her 1954 novel, “The Bird’s Nest,” features a young woman with dissociative identity disorder, the narration including the points of view of her alternate personalities. Any hope that Jackson’s private writing might convey a more unified sense of self seems quixotic. According to her biographer, Ruth Franklin, even as a teenager Jackson “kept multiple diaries simultaneously, each with a different purpose.” ...

In researching her biography, Franklin discovered a cache of letters Jackson wrote to a fan named Jeanne Beatty, whose taste in books she shared. The two never met. It’s only in reading these letters, written between 1959 and 1963, that it becomes evident how lonely Jackson was. Her confessions and enthusiasms come gushing forth as if she were a teenager who had finally, finally found a best friend. She explains to Jeanne her struggles to craft a “sustained taut style full of images and all kinds of double meanings.” At times, these letters relax into something like stream of consciousness, her habitual lowercase prose flowing from household noises to Jackson’s protean plans for “We Have Always Lived in the Castle”: “oo let us make a orchestra cries david you bang on the wastebasket. her name is jenny. she lives with her sister constance in a big old brown house saturated with family memories and her husband lives there too; they have been married for seven years and her sister constance still calls him mr harrap. they are going to kill him because he is a boor i think.” ...

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/07/11/...son-hyman-the-letters-of-shirley-jackson.html

T o mark the publication of the letters, The New Yorker has put The Lottery online.

The Lottery​

By Shirley Jackson June 18, 1948

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1948/06/26/the-lottery
 

blessmycottonsocks

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Messages
6,403
Reaction score
12,000
Points
289
Location
Wessex and Mercia
Crone Wood.

A 2017 low budget mash-up of The Wicker Man and Blair Witch, with hints of Midsommer and Children of the Corn thrown in.
The old found-footage, jerky-cam technique has become something of a cliché too so, if it's originality you're after, then maybe best give this a miss.
And yet, there was something quite compelling about the creepily sensual witches, the rural Irish setting was reasonably atmospheric and there's even a catchy folk song celebrating Celticness (great to hear the Cornish get a mention) to boot.
So, whilst not a classic of the genre it does provide a few memorable scenes and, at just 86 minutes, Crone Wood just about succeeds in not overstaying its welcome.
See if you can guess the twist!
5/10.
Just come onto Prime Video.

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt5261772/
 
Last edited:

Naughty_Felid

kneesy earsy nosey
Joined
Mar 11, 2008
Messages
9,228
Reaction score
13,063
Points
299
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Hole_in_the_Ground_(film) (2019)

A single mum and her son start over in a rented house by an ancient woodland. Shortly after her son goes temporarily missing in the wood the mother begins to notice that her son is acting differently. Is this a result of her recent breakup, the sleeping tablets she has been prescribed?

Sarah, (the mother), visits a neighbor played by the ever-dependable James Cosmo whose wife Norren went insane demanding that her son was an imposter.

Her son's oddities begin to mount up and... Well, I'll leave the rest.

The film is set in Ireland and perhaps could have used the countryside to better effect as the film Without Name (2016) did. The story is as old as the hills and was done quite well by a cast including the striking-looking Seana Kerslake who played the mother and the very eerie James Quinn Markey who plays the son who was also very good in the Vikings TV show.

As noted by others this isn't an original story but is a good addition to the changling horror genre. 6.5 out of 10.
 

hunck

Antediluvian
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,713
Reaction score
10,641
Points
299
Location
Hobbs End
We've decided it's high time we properly investigated the work of Ben Wheatley, starting at the beginning.

Down Terrace was first up, I had no idea what to expect but I really enjoyed it. Bonus points for it being set in Brighton and the local references such as 'trouble in Whitehawk' really added a little something for us adopted locals. The first flat I had in Brighton was a stone's throw from the real Down Terrace.

Last Saturday we watched the second instalment, Kill List. Brilliant stuff with incredible performances. Loved it.

Sightseers next.
We watched Kill List at the weekend & really liked it - seriously weird, keeps you wondering wtf is going on & why. Good performances all round & nice to see a British film. One gripe - dialogue is hard to follow as much of it is quiet/mumbly - a common issue with many films these days. You get the gist though. Sightseers still my favourite of his films I’ve seen so far.
 

sherbetbizarre

Special Branch
Joined
Sep 4, 2004
Messages
4,661
Reaction score
6,411
Points
239
Severin are releasing their WOODLANDS DARK AND DAYS BEWITCHED: A HISTORY OF FOLK HORROR documentary on Blu-Ray this December (Stateside) either alone, or part of this MONSTER boxset, complete with 20 (!) Folk Horror films...


folk.jpg


Some of these sound great... Eyes of Fire seems to be a popular one, and the Australian ones look interesting!
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
33,111
Reaction score
21,570
Points
334
Just read the Kim Newman review of that folk horror doc and he mentions it's THREE AND A QUARTER HOURS LONG! He compares it to Los Angeles Plays Itself, the cult clipfest doc about LA in movies that lasts about the same time.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
46,650
Reaction score
41,570
Points
334
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Is it Folk Horror Day today today? I noticed that a few MPs are wearing Sheaves of Wheat badges in the Commons.
Back British Farming Day or something like that.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
53,450
Reaction score
30,963
Points
314
Location
Eblana
The Green Knight: A Folk Horror take on this Epic Medieval Poem. Even shades of Macbeth as Morgan le Fay (Sarita Choudhury) along with her two "sisters" perform a magic rite to summon up The Green Knight. The Green Knight (Ralph Ineson) himself is reminiscent of the Green man of the forests, indeed his skin is of bark as he rides a destrier into King Arthur's Court, Sir Gawain (Dev Patel) who is Morgan's son takes up TGK's challenge but is allowed to decapitate him. The head (not the only talking one in the film) then addresses Gawain telling him that in a year he must travel to the Green Chapel to receive a similar blow. This narrative strays from that of the Poem in places and could be seen as revisionist as well as the Folk Horror Tropes it takes some influences from Boorman's Excalibur and Kurzel's Macbeth.

Gawain's lover Essel is of common stock and he cruelly abandons her for a Lady once Essel has borne him a son, both are played by Alice Vikander. Gawain's quest to meet TGK takes him across changing landscapes but it is obvious that a sickness is upon the land, wrecked castles, fields covered in corpses and bones, people cutting down the last trees. He is ambushed by feral youths led by Barry Keoghan, meets a friendly fox, spirits and strange lodgings in a forest. Ritual again is important, Gawain wears a green girdle made by Morgan, full of runes and bones, this will protect him. Time moves in strange ways, flows back on itself, offers different possible outcomes. Uneven in parts nevertheless this is an engrossing retelling of the tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Stunning cinematography, production design and costumes. Written, Directed & Edited by David Lowery. 8/10.

In cinemas and on Prime.
 
Last edited:

blessmycottonsocks

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Messages
6,403
Reaction score
12,000
Points
289
Location
Wessex and Mercia
The Green Knight: A Folk Horror take on this Epic Medieval Poem. Even shades of Macbeth as Morgan le Fay (Sarita Choudhury) along with her two "sisters" perform a magic rite to summon up The Green Knight. The Green Knight (Ralph Ineson) himself is reminiscent of the Green man of the forests, indeed his skin is of bark as he rides a destrier into King Arthur's Court, Sir Gawain (Dev Patel) who is Morgan's son takes up TGK's challenge but is allowed to decapitate him. The head (not the only talking one in the film) then addresses Gawain telling him that in a year he must travel to the Green Chapel to receive a similar blow. This narrative strays from that of the Poem in places and could be seen as revisionist as well as the Folk Horror Tropes it takes some influences from Boorman's Excalibur and Kurzel's Macbeth.

Gawain's lover Essel is of common stock and he cruelly abandons her for a Lady once Essel has borne him a son, both are played by Alice Vikander. Gawain's quest to meet TGK takes him across changing landscapes but it is obvious that a sickness is upon the land, wrecked castles, fields covered in corpses and bones, people cutting down the last trees. He is ambushed by feral youths led by Barry Keoghan, meets a friendly fox, spirits and strange lodgings in a forest. Ritual again is important, Gawain wears a green girdle made by Morgan, full of runes and bones, this will protect him. Time moves in strange ways, flows back on itself, offers different possible outcomes. Uneven in parts nevertheless this is an engrossing retelling of the tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Stunning cinematography, production design and costumes. Written, Directed & Edited by David Lowery. 8/10.

In cinemas and on Prime.
Tried to persuade my good lady to watch this last night, but 2 hours 10 minutes of arthouse Arthuriana didn't get the thumbs up, so we settled for The Hike instead.
May post a review to the Horror thread tomorrow.
In the meantime, will try The Green Knight again tonight, as you rated it so highly.
 

Frideswide

Fortea Morgana :) PeteByrdie certificated Princess
Joined
Jul 14, 2014
Messages
14,289
Reaction score
17,543
Points
289
Location
An Eochair
Tried to persuade my good lady to watch this last night, but 2 hours 10 minutes of arthouse Arthuriana didn't get the thumbs up, so we settled for The Hike instead.

We have an arrangement where we watch films etc together :loveu:

But one of us will be doing something else - in my case it's audiobook-through-headphones and embroidery. Mr Frideswide has noise cancelling headphones and a book. Both of us enjoy taking a bijou napette...
 

blessmycottonsocks

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 22, 2014
Messages
6,403
Reaction score
12,000
Points
289
Location
Wessex and Mercia
Tried to persuade my good lady to watch this last night, but 2 hours 10 minutes of arthouse Arthuriana didn't get the thumbs up, so we settled for The Hike instead.
May post a review to the Horror thread tomorrow.
In the meantime, will try The Green Knight again tonight, as you rated it so highly.

Just finished now (although my lady gave up after half an hour).
A bit torn on rating this.
As barmily bonkers as Sky Atlantic's Brittania, but with fewer laughs, The Green Knight treads a fine line between a beautiful and satisfying tapestry and a lurid fantasy comic strip.
If the viewer can ignore blatant anachronisms such as medieval castles with leaded windows being besieged by trébuchets at least half a millenium too early, not to mention the incongruity of a Romano-British king having an Indian nephew, there is much to enjoy here, especially the visionary cinematography, soft-focus eye-candy and haunting folksy/prog-rock score.
Some of it really drags though and my drooping eyelids were only prised wide open by the sudden WTF appearance of a Von Trier-esque talking fox and the occasional stray into Pythonesque territory.
It was fun, kind-of, while it lasted and bits of it will remain with me for a long time (but some big chunks have already been forgotten).
Can't help feeling that it thinks it's a tad cleverer than it really is.
Maybe 6/10 in my book.
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
33,111
Reaction score
21,570
Points
334
The Green Knight struck me as a modern fanboy fanfic of the old poem, and knowing it was inspired equally by Willow (the 80s would-be Tolkien thing) does not persuade me otherwise. David Lowery sure has a nice way with the pictures, though.
 

hunck

Antediluvian
Joined
Jul 13, 2011
Messages
6,713
Reaction score
10,641
Points
299
Location
Hobbs End
The Green Knight - Visually stunning, the story is not it’s best aspect - the Knight is beheaded with the deal he returns the favour one year later. As to why… You have to put that to one side as Gawain’s journey to the Green Chapel unfolds with trials/tribulations & hallucinogenic dream-like incidents along the way.

It’s slow in places - not for action movie fans, & one gripe in the cinema we saw it - soundtrack is unnecessarily LOUD - a common syndrome with films these days. That aside, I loved it, stunning cinematography. Also an 8/10 for me.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
53,450
Reaction score
30,963
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Fever Dream: a tale of a sickness upon the land, poisoned water, affecting horses and humans. Also a story about friendship and maternal love, and hate. A folk healer can "cure" the afflicted but at a cost. It involves the transmigration of spirits, half of the affected person's spirit departs and lodges within a healthy body but it is replaced by another anima. This causes the "cured" (especially children) to act like changelings. One mother describes her son as having been transformed into a monster. The horror here is predominately psychological but is no less effective than the gore/shock variety. The film does require close attention and perhaps even a second viewing but all the answers yiu seek to solve the mystery are within it. Not everything is as it seems at first glance and some characters show unexpected depths. An Eco-Folk Horror tale which you won't forget in a hurry. Directed by Claudia Llosa, adapted by Llosa and Samanta Schweblin from Schweblin's novel. On Netflix. 8/10.
 

skinny

aka Wuluwait, Boatman of the Dead
Joined
May 30, 2010
Messages
8,039
Reaction score
8,659
Points
299
Location
Planck Units

skinny

aka Wuluwait, Boatman of the Dead
Joined
May 30, 2010
Messages
8,039
Reaction score
8,659
Points
299
Location
Planck Units
The Green Knight: A Folk Horror take on this Epic Medieval Poem. Even shades of Macbeth as Morgan le Fay (Sarita Choudhury) along with her two "sisters" perform a magic rite to summon up The Green Knight. The Green Knight (Ralph Ineson) himself is reminiscent of the Green man of the forests, indeed his skin is of bark as he rides a destrier into King Arthur's Court, Sir Gawain (Dev Patel) who is Morgan's son takes up TGK's challenge but is allowed to decapitate him. The head (not the only talking one in the film) then addresses Gawain telling him that in a year he must travel to the Green Chapel to receive a similar blow. This narrative strays from that of the Poem in places and could be seen as revisionist as well as the Folk Horror Tropes it takes some influences from Boorman's Excalibur and Kurzel's Macbeth.

Gawain's lover Essel is of common stock and he cruelly abandons her for a Lady once Essel has borne him a son, both are played by Alice Vikander. Gawain's quest to meet TGK takes him across changing landscapes but it is obvious that a sickness is upon the land, wrecked castles, fields covered in corpses and bones, people cutting down the last trees. He is ambushed by feral youths led by Barry Keoghan, meets a friendly fox, spirits and strange lodgings in a forest. Ritual again is important, Gawain wears a green girdle made by Morgan, full of runes and bones, this will protect him. Time moves in strange ways, flows back on itself, offers different possible outcomes. Uneven in parts nevertheless this is an engrossing retelling of the tale of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Stunning cinematography, production design and costumes. Written, Directed & Edited by David Lowery. 8/10.

In cinemas and on Prime.
I really enjoyed it. Burned at a nice consistent pace. Recommend.
 

brownmane

off kilter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
1,666
Reaction score
3,746
Points
159
Location
Ontario, Canada
Here's what looks to be another A24 must-see.
Lamb

I fear I now know too much. The article gives the game away. Here it is anyway.
https://www.abc.net.au/news/2021-10...ndic-horror-movie-with-noomi-rapace/100535480
It sounds delicious. I shall wait for a screening at my cinema for the apparently exquisite photography.

Trailer at the end of the article.
Very odd. I swear that I've seen this, and yet it's not been released until this month. Maybe the trailer seems to give so much away that I think I've watched the whole movie. I do know that it is a very strange movie, but apparently I couldn't have possibly seen it yet.
 

ramonmercado

CyberPunk
Joined
Aug 19, 2003
Messages
53,450
Reaction score
30,963
Points
314
Location
Eblana
Very odd. I swear that I've seen this, and yet it's not been released until this month. Maybe the trailer seems to give so much away that I think I've watched the whole movie. I do know that it is a very strange movie, but apparently I couldn't have possibly seen it yet.

It has been available to stream at least at the Ifi and Lighthouse Cinema Online since early this year.
 

brownmane

off kilter
Joined
Feb 1, 2019
Messages
1,666
Reaction score
3,746
Points
159
Location
Ontario, Canada
It has been available to stream at least at the Ifi and Lighthouse Cinema Online since early this year.
That might explain it. Though I didn't mention it on here as it is almost impossible to explain without telling the whole story. I also couldn't really make up my mind about it and didn't really like it, so I remember very little of it.

Any movie I don't like, I often can't remember it, until I go to watch it again. I've seen several bad films several times this way.:rolleyes:

I also don't remember bad jokes which subjects me to the same hell. When people start to tell me a crappy joke, I usually say "I know I've heard this one, but don't remember it". And I get to hear the bad one again :headbang:
Course the good ones I only hear once.
 
Top