Folk Horror

CarlosTheDJ

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...Based on a Basque folk tale, ”Patxi herrementaria,” collected by priest, archaeologist and anthropologist José Migel de Barandiarán in 1903, the story is set in the Basque region in 1845, in a universe inhabited by mythological diabolic creatures, battling to capture the souls of the unwitting....
I was in the Basque Country a couple of weeks ago for a few days - travelling around from Bilbao and Vitoria-Gasteiz. It struck me that the Euskadi has a more Northern European feel to it than the other parts of Spain that I’m familiar with - even in the way people behave and dress (more padded jackets and outdoor gear, because of the chill of the mountains - and Bilbao was as wet as Manchester...but prettier).

Vitoria even has a bar called Rivendell - I might be totally off the mark, but for some reason I just don't associate such overt Lord of the Rings references with Spain; but somehow the craggy mist-cowled mountains and unbelievably thick forests of the Basque region make such a connection seem appropriate. Even the bar culture itself felt somehow more 'northern'.

Anyway, I wondered whether the folklore might be different in this area of the country. Spain doesn't seem to do ghosts in the same way the Brits do - but something about this area made me wonder if it was different here. It'll be interesting to see how the film relates to northern barbarian ghost lovers.
 

FrKadash

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Inspired by a large supermarket development in Cardigan, RE-TOLLED draws on imagery of the Mari Lwyd and other folk ritual in an attempt to manifest the 'spirit' of the land. As trees are felled and the landscape altered, the reverberations are felt deep in the earth, disturbing creatures that are now only remembered in folk memory.
 

RyoHazuki

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Apologies if this has already been mentioned, but the awesome "Diving Belles" by Lucy Wood is a definite contender IMO. Yes, all the stories have ancient lore as a backbone, but she does an amazing job of weaving modern vignettes around them. There's also a pleasantly eerie atmosphere running through the whole book which is hard to pin down.
 

FrKadash

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Feels like a very personal nostalgia book for me .. I was born a Fortean clearly !
Finally got a copy of Scarred For Life the other week, started reading it and it's really good, looks into so many great programmes from the era, and it's a massive book at 740 pages! Highly recommended to anyone interested in folk horror.
 

Inkypink

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Apologies if this has already been mentioned, but the awesome "Diving Belles" by Lucy Wood is a definite contender IMO. Yes, all the stories have ancient lore as a backbone, but she does an amazing job of weaving modern vignettes around them. There's also a pleasantly eerie atmosphere running through the whole book which is hard to pin down.
I credit my interest in folk horror entirely to the lovely Toni Arthur, who succeeded in making me shiver with nervous glee as a child every October when they dug up the episode of whatever programme it was that contained her song 'The Witches of Halloween'. This song was always followed by some animation thing about a pumpkin-headed creature (Jack?) who hopped, I think, with a stick. The method of animation was as eerie as the story...something to do with the stop-motion technique.

Found it. Yep, is still creepy. Will try to add link.

As I suspected is is the animation and the darned hopping that are unsettling. Even 'Chorlton and the Wheelies' was scary because of the stop-motion. And the witch.

There are also hideously long gaps left for you to read the words, something which shouldn't be scary but is. I watched it and became acutely aware of the hum of my fridge. TV for kids today is very noisy and nothing stops...
 
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FrKadash

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As many of us love the genre, I thought we could do with a separate dedicated Fortean Culture thread for all folk horror related TV, film, radio and book recommendations, rather than keep posting video links etc., to the Folk Horror thread over on General Forteana.

To get us started...

The Black Tower (1985-87)

 
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FrKadash

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Folk horror, a history: from The Wicker Man to The League of Gentlemen
By Ben Myers
26 July 2017

In 1801, the proportion of the population of England and Wales living in towns and cities was just 17 per cent, but by the close of that century, as landowners were displaced and industry boomed, it had jumped to 72 per cent. The most recent UK census showed that 81.5 per cent of the population of England and Wales now live in urban areas, with less than 10 per cent residing in what would qualify as villages or hamlets.

This mass movement from agricultural to post-industrial life has detached us from the land that fed and clothed us for thousands of years, with the countryside becoming increasingly alien territory, avoided or misunderstood by those who have little contact with mud, dead animals, or the stench of excrement. Such urbanites have scant knowledge of farming or food production and patronise ancient local traditions. They are unnerved by the space, the silence. They fear their countryside, their own past.
http://www.newstatesman.com/culture...orror-history-wicker-man-league-gentlemen?amp
 

FrKadash

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The Ghoul review – a pleasingly perplexing enigma

An occult plot is discovered in Gareth Tunley’s terrific shoestring debut as writer and director. Or is it all in the hero’s mind?
Wendy Ide
Sunday 6 August 2017 08.00 BST

First time writer/director Gareth Tunley marshals the meagre resources of this micro-budget psychological thriller and creates a pleasingly perplexing enigma of a movie. Tom Meeten stars, face desolately etched, eyes darting, as Chris, a man whose therapy sessions unearth an occult plot that may or may not be all in his chaotic mind.
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2017/aug/06/the-ghoul-observer-review

 

hunck

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As many of us love the genre, I thought we could do with a separate dedicated Fortean Culture thread for all folk horror related TV, film, radio and book recommendations, rather than keep posting video links etc., to the Folk Horror thread over on General Forteana.

To get us started...

The Black Tower (1985-87)


http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0088483/
That was good in a slow, minimal, low key kind of way. Was it originally shown on tv as part of a series? Totally unlike anything you'll see on tv these days. The imdb link is for a different Black Tower though.
 

MrRING

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Sorry that I haven’t gotten it yet, but what is meant by “folk” in terms of this thread? I’m just curious, as the first link for Dark Tower could be a bit folkloreish, but The Ghoul seems like an indy horror without a real folklore component. Once I know exactly what you mean, I’ll be sure to add anything that I think of that fits!
 

dr wu

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Leaves...?

At any rate...don't know if this fits ,if not consider it a book recommendation, but I highly recommend Mythago Wood by Robert Holdstock.
 

FrKadash

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The Forgotten: Raoul Servais' "Harpya" (1979)
In Raoul Servais' macabre animated Harpya. a bourgeois bachelor is persecuted by a malign bird-creature. Forever.
David Cairns 19 Oct 2017

OK, this film isn't forgotten. It's extremely well-remembered by enthusiasts of European animated shorts. I'm just assuming that means most of us haven't heard of it. It's the most celebrated work by Belgian filmmaker Raoul Servais, but has a haunted, Eastern European feel reminiscent of Jan Švankmajer's sinister pixillations.
https://mubi.com/notebook/posts/the-forgotten-raoul-servais-harpya-1979

 
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