Folk Horror

Zeke Newbold

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Have we mentioned The Hound of the Baskervilles yet?

The fact that Conan-Doyle had been inspired by real folk legends concerning spectral dogs from South-West England and the geopgraphical centrality of the Grimpen Mire to the whole set up all point to this as being Folk horror par excellence.


Which is your favourite version?
 
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The Hole In The Ground: A great example of Irish Folk Horror with chilling versions of two songs which I'll never be able to regard in a humorous light again - There was an old woman And she lived in the wood (Weila Weila Waila) and The Rattling Bog. The hole in the ground is discovered in a wood by Sarah (Seána Kerlake) when she is searching for her son Chris (James Markey). It is a vast pi, too big to really exist and signifies something else, later we see Sarah sinking into the ground itself as she nears the supposed location of the pit. Chris starts to act oddly after this incident and they both meet The Old Woman Of The Wood, Norreen, (Kati Outinen) who roams the roads in search of her son, killed by her in an accident decades ago. Noreen believes that the boy she killed was a changeling, as is Chris.

Chris continues to behave strangely and Sarah begins to suspect that he may in fact be a changeling but she is also conscious of the stress she suffers and the effects of an old head injury. What is real and what are hallucinations start to blur as life becomes increasingly surreal for Sarah as she feels alienated in this new (for her and Chris) rural community. Is she becoming another woman who lives in the woods?

From the outset the woods ooze a feeling of otherness, a road into them seems rather to be a narrow trail into a vast primeval forest making clever use of drone cameras. On the ground the woods in day or night easily instil a sense of dread, easily leading to existential panic at the slightest odd occurrence. Locals know of the changeling legend, even at some levels accept it as a reality but will not openly acknowledge it as a fact. This is perhaps best illustrated by Des (James Cosmo), Noreen's husband.

A worthy addition to the Irish Folk Horror Film Canon by Director (and co-writer) Lee Cronin. 8.5/10.
 

Frideswide

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Is it very bad to find people you really don't know at all really rather attractive? asking for a friend. :shy:
 
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Border (Gráns): A film which might best be described as Swedish Folk Horror as it mixes tropes of Trolls and Changelings with everyday Human Horror. Tina (Eva Melander) is different, she has a somewhat neanderthal appearance but also possesses strange talents. She works as a Customs Officer and can literally sniff out out wrongdoers, whether they are smuggling alcohol, drugs or other contraband. She literally becomes aware of their sense of fear and guilt. One day she meets someone who looks as odd as herself passing through her Customs channel, a man called Vore (Eero Milonoff). They sniff at each other and thus begins what might be a beautiful relationship or a nightmare.

This is the story of another species of Human or perhaps something far stranger, it depends on whether you view the film as Science Fiction/Horror or Fantasy/Horror. Tina and Vore are closer to nature, they run naked through forests and swim in lakes, have a relationship with animals that allows them to commune. They fear thunder storms, seem to attract lightning. But the story takes a far darker as Vore doesn't just want to make more little Trolls, he also has a lust for vengeance. To make humanity pay for driving Trolls to the point of extinction. There are also some extraordinary gender-bending episodes in Border and an intriguing explanation for the nature of Changelings is proffered.

Moving performances by Melander and Milonoff as they explore their angst, loss and alienation. A disturbing but powerful film which will make you think about the nature of differences and what constitutes a Monster. Director/Co-Writer Ali Abbasi delivers an original contribution to the Troll Film Genre. 9/10.
 

Naughty_Felid

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Border (Gráns): A film which might best be described as Swedish Folk Horror as it mixes tropes of Trolls and Changelings with everyday Human Horror. Tina (Eva Melander) is different, she has a somewhat neanderthal appearance but also possesses strange talents. She works as a Customs Officer and can literally sniff out out wrongdoers, whether they are smuggling alcohol, drugs or other contraband. She literally becomes aware of their sense of fear and guilt. One day she meets someone who looks as odd as herself passing through her Customs channel, a man called Vore (Eero Milonoff). They sniff at each other and thus begins what might be a beautiful relationship or a nightmare.

This is the story of another species of Human or perhaps something far stranger, it depends on whether you view the film as Science Fiction/Horror or Fantasy/Horror. Tina and Vore are closer to nature, they run naked through forests and swim in lakes, have a relationship with animals that allows them to commune. They fear thunder storms, seem to attract lightning. But the story takes a far darker as Vore doesn't just want to make more little Trolls, he also has a lust for vengeance. To make humanity pay for driving Trolls to the point of extinction. There are also some extraordinary gender-bending episodes in Border and an intriguing explanation for the nature of Changelings is proffered.

Moving performances by Melander and Milonoff as they explore their angst, loss and alienation. A disturbing but powerful film which will make you think about the nature of differences and what constitutes a Monster. Director/Co-Writer Ali Abbasi delivers an original contribution to the Troll Film Genre. 9/10.
Where did you find this Ramon?
 

Zeke Newbold

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Border (Gráns): A film which might best be described as Swedish Folk Horror as it mixes tropes of Trolls and Changelings with everyday Human Horror. Tina (Eva Melander) is different, she has a somewhat neanderthal appearance but also possesses strange talents. She works as a Customs Officer and can literally sniff out out wrongdoers, whether they are smuggling alcohol, drugs or other contraband. She literally becomes aware of their sense of fear and guilt. One day she meets someone who looks as odd as herself passing through her Customs channel, a man called Vore (Eero Milonoff). They sniff at each other and thus begins what might be a beautiful relationship or a nightmare.

This is the story of another species of Human or perhaps something far stranger, it depends on whether you view the film as Science Fiction/Horror or Fantasy/Horror. Tina and Vore are closer to nature, they run naked through forests and swim in lakes, have a relationship with animals that allows them to commune. They fear thunder storms, seem to attract lightning. But the story takes a far darker as Vore doesn't just want to make more little Trolls, he also has a lust for vengeance. To make humanity pay for driving Trolls to the point of extinction. There are also some extraordinary gender-bending episodes in Border and an intriguing explanation for the nature of Changelings is proffered.

Moving performances by Melander and Milonoff as they explore their angst, loss and alienation. A disturbing but powerful film which will make you think about the nature of differences and what constitutes a Monster. Director/Co-Writer Ali Abbasi delivers an original contribution to the Troll Film Genre. 9/10.
I'm pretty damn sure that this one was shown in some mainstream cinemas in Moscow! I saw the trailer for it and was intrigued. I didn't bother however - I mean it's hard enouigh watching a film in original Russian without watching one in Swedish and dubbed into Russian!

If I'm right then it's good to see Swedish films breaking in to the international market.
 

FrKadash

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The Hole In The Ground: A great example of Irish Folk Horror.
Saw your post as I was just about to mention the film. I watched it last night after reading the positive review in the last FT. I really enjoyed it, reminded me of the British-Irish horror film, The Hallow (2015). I love gems like this, they are few and far between, but that makes it all the better when you find one. The locations used were excellent and atmospheric, I'm in rural Ireland now and thought it was the best time to watch it! Highly recommended.
 
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Saw your post as I was just about to mention the film. I watched it last night after reading the positive review in the last FT. I really enjoyed it, reminded me of the British-Irish horror film, The Hallow (2015). I love gems like this, they are few and far between, but that makes it all the better when you find one. The locations used were excellent and atmospheric, I'm in rural Ireland now and thought it was the best time to watch it! Highly recommended.
What does the FT review say? I still haven'r received 377.
 

FrKadash

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What does the FT review say? I still haven'r received 377.
They gave it 5 stars and in the reviewer's opinion, ''...not particularly original. But that's nit-picking: (...) this is already a contender for the best horror film of 2019.'' On the same page was a review of Border, which was awarded only 3 stars by the same guy.
 

skinny

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Border (Gráns): A film which might best be described as Swedish Folk Horror as it mixes tropes of Trolls and Changelings with everyday Human Horror. Tina (Eva Melander) is different, she has a somewhat neanderthal appearance but also possesses strange talents. She works as a Customs Officer and can literally sniff out out wrongdoers, whether they are smuggling alcohol, drugs or other contraband. She literally becomes aware of their sense of fear and guilt. One day she meets someone who looks as odd as herself passing through her Customs channel, a man called Vore (Eero Milonoff). They sniff at each other and thus begins what might be a beautiful relationship or a nightmare.

This is the story of another species of Human or perhaps something far stranger, it depends on whether you view the film as Science Fiction/Horror or Fantasy/Horror. Tina and Vore are closer to nature, they run naked through forests and swim in lakes, have a relationship with animals that allows them to commune. They fear thunder storms, seem to attract lightning. But the story takes a far darker as Vore doesn't just want to make more little Trolls, he also has a lust for vengeance. To make humanity pay for driving Trolls to the point of extinction. There are also some extraordinary gender-bending episodes in Border and an intriguing explanation for the nature of Changelings is proffered.

Moving performances by Melander and Milonoff as they explore their angst, loss and alienation. A disturbing but powerful film which will make you think about the nature of differences and what constitutes a Monster. Director/Co-Writer Ali Abbasi delivers an original contribution to the Troll Film Genre. 9/10.
Good review. Border is one of the most mesmerising things I've seen in ages. I was completely absorbed right to the end. Watch it.
 

skinny

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Saw your post as I was just about to mention the film. I watched it last night after reading the positive review in the last FT. I really enjoyed it, reminded me of the British-Irish horror film, The Hallow (2015). I love gems like this, they are few and far between, but that makes it all the better when you find one. The locations used were excellent and atmospheric, I'm in rural Ireland now and thought it was the best time to watch it! Highly recommended.
The Hallow could have been far better IMHO. I want to watch it again though, as everyone else loves it. I thought the faeries were used as little more than stylised zombies in an escape flick. There could have been much more powerful use made of their malevolent intelligence and motivation drawn from the folk narrative. They're far more nefarious than the film depicts.
 

FrKadash

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I watched an unusual film last night, The Wind (2018). Which I can only describe as a folk horror western. The story was interesting, but the film was a bit slow at times and didn't explain itself too much. I'm not certain but I think the film may have been inspired by a 1925 book of the same name by Dorothy Scarborough, which I always thought was a fairly obscure supernatural story. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_(novel)

Here's the brief wiki description of the film,
A plains-woman is driven mad by isolation, as a supernatural force haunts the untamed lands where she resides.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_(2018_film)

 

Ulalume

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I watched an unusual film last night, The Wind (2018). Which I can only describe as a folk horror western. The story was interesting, but the film was a bit slow at times and didn't explain itself too much. I'm not certain but I think the film may have been inspired by a 1925 book of the same name by Dorothy Scarborough, which I always thought was a fairly obscure supernatural story. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_(novel)

Here's the brief wiki description of the film,


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Wind_(2018_film)

Looks interesting. I'd heard of the Lillian Gish film, but never knew about the novel. West Texas could drive a person mad indeed. :tumble:
 

Zeke Newbold

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The Soviet film Viy from 1967 is sometimes called `the first Soviet horror movie` on account of its ambience., even though it was -presumably - aimed at a family audience. It is based on a short story by Nikolai Gogol who in turn was inspired by the folk tales of his native Ukraine.

It has a spooky atmosphere reminiscent of some of the Hammer Horror films from Britain in the same period. Full movie with English subtitles:

 
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Outcast: A mother, Mary (Kate Dickie) and her son Fergal (Niall Bruton) flee to Scotland and settle in a rundown estate on the outskirts of Edinburgh. They are pursued by others who believe that Fergal is an abomination and must be killed. On an Irish Traveller halting site Cathal (James Nesbitt) undergoes an excruciating tattoo ritual, this will enable him to slay the boy and will give him great power afterwards. Cathal is accompanied on his quest by Liam (Ciarán McMenamin) a ritual magician who will track the hidden pair and counter Mary's Spells. Mary is seen mixing her own blood into liquids and draws protective runes on the walls of their flat to conceal them from those who wish them harm. This is a world in which magic works and Mary uses words of power to confound an irksome housing officer.

A settled Romany girl Petronella (Hanna Stanbridge) falls for Fergal and their doomed relationship is central to the films development. Liam and Fergal have to get the permission of the Laird (James Cosmo) to continue their hunt in Scotland. Having secured it, Liam sacrifices pigeons to locate Mary and Fergal. On the Edinburgh estate a strange beast is loose and is gruesomely killing locals.

This is the story of those who believe they are part of an old race, most of which has departed this world, the remainder living in the shadows. Practitiones of magic live on but when a forbidden mating takes place the issue of that union must be hunted down and destroyed. A dark tale of folk magic, strange rituals, even necromancy and a monster. Great performances by all involved especially Nesbitt who doesn't realise that he is being used by greater forces rather than achieving his manifest destiny. Dickie is superb as the fiercely protective mother, she truly convinces as a Witch. Bruton and Stanbridge will scald your heart in their portrayal of the Star Crossed Traveller/Romany lovers.

The film is confusing at times though and it may also involve the coalescence/clash of two competing schools of magic. The Irish and Scottish accents are often difficult to comprehend. But director/co-writer Colm McCarthy delivers an engaging tale of Love and Horror. 8/10.

On Horror Channel,showing again on Friday 12th April at 12.25 AM.
 
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Coal

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Outcast: A mother, Mary (Kate Dickie) and her son Fergal (Niall Bruton) flee to Scotland and settle in a rundown estate on the outskirts of Edinburgh. They are pursued by others who believe that Fergal is an abomination and must be killed. On an Irish Traveller halting site Cathal (James Nesbitt) undergoes an excruciating tattoo ritual, this will enable him to slay the boy and will give him great power afterwards. Cathal is accompanied on his quest by Liam (Ciarán McMenamin) a ritual magician who will track the hidden pair and counter Mary's Spells. Mary is seen mixing her own blood into liquids and draws protective runes on the walls of their flat to conceal them from those who wish them harm. This is a world in which magic works and Mary uses words of power to confound an irksome housing officer.

A settled Romany girl Petronella (Hanna Stanbridge) falls for Fergal and their doomed relationship is central to the films development. Liam and Fergal have to get the permission of the Laird (James Cosmo) to continue their hunt in Scotland. Having secured it, Liam sacrifices pigeons to locate Mary and Fergal. On the Edinburgh estate a strange beast is loose and is gruesomely killing locals.

This is the story of those who believe they are part of an old race, most of which has departed this world, the remainder living in the shadows. Practitiones of magic live on but when a forbidden mating takes place the issue of that union must be hunted down and destroyed. A dark tale of folk magic, strange rituals, even necromancy and a monster. Great performances by all involved especially Nesbitt who doesn't realise that he is being used by greater forces rather than achieving his manifest destiny. Dickie is superb as the fiercely protective mother, she truly convinces as a Witch. Bruton and Stanbridge will scald your heart in their portrayal of the Star Crossed Traveller/Romany lovers.

The film is confusing at times though and it may also involve the coalescence/clash of two competing schools of magic. The Irish and Scottish accents are often difficult to comprehend. But director/co-writer Colm McCarthy delivers an engaging tale of Love and Horror. 8/10.

On Horror Channel,showing again on Friday 12th April at 12.25 AM.
Recorder set, sounds fascinating, thank you.
 

FrKadash

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What did you think about Cathal? Was he another type of magical practitioner? Did he come from another strange race?
I'm not sure but I took it that he was from another ancient race, but it doesn't give much away about their origins, which is good in some ways as the film allows you to use your imagination. This is another one of those horror/folk horror gems that come by once in a blue moon.
 
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