Forgotten History

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MM is mostly filmed in the Chilterns and the surround. In the early series I amused myself by playing 'spot the place I know well'.
Hah, I like doing that for all sorts of tv progs and movies.
I do this too when watching George Gently.

Watched 'The Ash Tree' the other night, a Ghost story for Christmas filmed back in 1975 and thought that the country mansion in it looked a bit like Groby Hall in 'Parade's End', which in real life is Duncombe Park, Helmsley, North Yorks. There isn't any filming location info for Ash Tree on IMDB, wonder if anyone reading this knows anything?
 

dejanmikic

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This is a fascinating bit of totally-unknown (to me) history: The Black Tom Explosion -this is astounding. Why isn't this as well-known as the Zimmerman Telegram?

....

Very odd....on all sorts of levels
I believe this is one of the more famous "Mandela Effects". Apparently, this event just became widely known pushing some to declare CERN did it :)
 

JamesWhitehead

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Bad Bungle

Dingo took my tray bake.
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There is a good article in today's Guardian about a large ice-house, which has been excavated under the streets of London. They imported Fjords to fill it! Ice was used to numb patients for surgery, which was news to me! In all the old films, it was a slug of whisky for minor amputation and legless for the shortly-to-be-legless. :boozing:
I first thought this referred to the ice wells behind King's Cross Station that's on my 2019 to-do list. But your article seems to be for something older and grander - I'll add it to the list thanks.

https://www.atlasobscura.com/places/the-king-s-cross-ice-well-london-england
 

Eyespy

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MM is mostly filmed in the Chilterns and the surround. In the early series I amused myself by playing 'spot the place I know well'.
We used to live in the area it was mostly filmed- very odd seeing it on screen. Now we live surrounded by place names oddly similar to those in Midsomer murders. I don't think the locals are a particularly murderous bunch.
 

AlchoPwn

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We used to live in the area it was mostly filmed- very odd seeing it on screen. Now we live surrounded by place names oddly similar to those in Midsomer murders. I don't think the locals are a particularly murderous bunch.
So, they've lulled you into a false sense of security then?:fire::reap::hide::freak::tank::fork::chain::fslap::rcard::jtease:
 
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The Favourite: Queen Victoria is staple of 19th Century drama whether as a character or the subject of a feature portrayal. However the reign of another female Monarch, Queen anne is largely forgotten. Director Yorgos Lanthimos now remedies this with The Favourite, set in 1708 when Queen Anne is distressed and a newly arrived servant raises her spirits. On a superficial level the film is similar to Mrs Brown and Victoria & Abdul, Lanthimos brings his own inimitable style to it.

Queen Anne (Olivia Colman) is depressed, suffering from gout and other ailments. Not caring for Affairs of State she allows her friend (and secret lover) Sarah Churchill (Rachael Weisz) to rule in her stead. Sarah uses this power to advance the military campaigns of her husband, the Duke of Marlborough (Mark Gatiss). Sarah's impoverished cousin Abigail (Emma Stone) arrives seeking a position in the household. At first she is a menial maid but when she provides a herbal remedy to ease the Queen's gout she is promoted and soon comes to vie with Sarah for Anne's affection and confidence.

A darkly comic tale of a battle of wills. For Abigail to lose means be returned to penury but for Sarah defeat will result in the loss of her (de facto) absolute power.Anne's Court can be a odd place, courtiers race ducks and lobsters for amusement, indeed the Prime Minister (James Smith) walks his pet duck around on a leash. Anne herself keeps seventeen pet rabbits, one for each of the children she has lost through miscarriages, still-births and infant deaths. The adventures of the Queen, Sarah and Abigail unfold in a manner which at times seems farcical but always advances the films inner logic. 9/10.
 
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Eyespy

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Mining disaster1.jpg Mining disaster2.jpg

If anyone is interested in this, I was passing through MSN last week and took a couple of pictures of the memorial stone. I was cornered by a local who was a distant descendant of one of the men killed. It was known locally who was responsible , it was a case of jealously over a promotion of one of the men in the lift. A rival for the promotion hacked through the cable. there may have been more but my informant had quite a pronounced local accent and it was raining.
 

Yithian

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Further to my reading on the Grice, I came across a footnote to history of which I, for one, was completely ignorant:

Scottish Pork Taboo
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia​
"Scottish pork taboo" was Donald Alexander Mackenzie's phrase for discussing an aversion to pork amongst Scots, particularly Highlanders, which he believed to stem from an ancient taboo. Several writers who confirm that there was a prejudice against pork, or a superstitious attitude to pigs, do not see it in terms of a taboo related to an ancient cult. Any prejudice is generally agreed to have been fading by 1800. Some writers attribute a scarcity or dislike of pork in certain periods to a shortage of pig fodder.
Mackenzie's ideas
Donald Mackenzie gave a lecture on the Scottish pork taboo in 1920 when he explained his idea that prejudices against pork-eating could be traced back to a centuries-old religious cult. When he published these theories in the 1930s, he suggested the taboo was imported to Scotland in pre-Roman times by Celtic mercenaries, influenced by the cult of Attis in Anatolia. (The cult of Attis did not abstain permanently from pork; it was a purification for their ceremonies.)
He dismissed any possibility that the pork taboo originated from a literal reading of the Bible, and disputed this with various arguments, noting that early Christian missionaries did not snub pork. He conceded that there was archaeological evidence of pigs being eaten in prehistoric Scotland, but suggested this might have come from pork-eating peoples living near others who did observe the taboo, or be related to ceremonial use of pigs. Later pork production was for export, not for local use, just as eels were caught to send to the English market, while they were unacceptable as food in Scotland. The taboo died out in the Lowlands earlier than in the Highlands, and by the 1800s most crofts in the Highlands and Islands would have kept a grice.
More Details:​
 
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"Scottish pork taboo" was Donald Alexander Mackenzie's phrase for discussing an aversion to pork amongst Scots, particularly Highlanders, which he believed to stem from an ancient taboo. Several writers who confirm that there was a prejudice against pork, or a superstitious attitude to pigs, do not see it in terms of a taboo related to an ancient cult. Any prejudice is generally agreed to have been fading by 1800. Some writers attribute a scarcity or dislike of pork in certain periods to a shortage of pig fodder.
It comes from the legend of the Werepig. Hogmanay was originally called Hogmanday.
 

hunck

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Brighton Museum's New Archeology Gallery Reconstructs Faces of Ancient Britons From South Coast

Forensic artist and sculptor, Oscar Nilsson, and the museum's senior keeper of collections, Richard Le Saux, have worked painstakingly for 14 months to not only bring the people back to life but also to tell their stories.

Patcham Woman - 210AD

A nail was embdedded into the back of her skull and Richard says she was impaled either just before or just after death.

Around this time there was concern that the body or spirit could rise after death and corpses were imapled with nails to fix the body into the grave.

There were further nails scattered in her grave, mainly by her knees, and she was found buried toe to toe with a man.



Whitehawk woman - lived 5,650 years ago

Her bones were found in 1933 in what now makes up part of Brighton race course.

She was a small and slender woman with dark skin and eyes.

Experts believe she was between 19 and 25-years-old when she passed away.

Tragically, the bones of a baby were found in her pelvis, indicating she died in childbirth, and was buried with good luck charms in her own grave.



Ditchling Road man - lived 4,287 years ago

This Bronze Age man is believed to be from the Beaker people, who died when he was between 25 and 35.

Life was tough for this chap. When he was aged between six and nine he suffered extreme malnutrition.

This meant he was gaunt and slightly shorter than average at just 5ft 6ins.

DNA results also show he had lost some teeth and was suffering from extreme tooth decay.



Neanderthal Woman




More at link.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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Ditchling Road man - lived 4,287 years ago

This Bronze Age man is believed to be from the Beaker people, who died when he was between 25 and 35.

Life was tough for this chap. When he was aged between six and nine he suffered extreme malnutrition.

This meant he was gaunt and slightly shorter than average at just 5ft 6ins.

DNA results also show he had lost some teeth and was suffering from extreme tooth decay.

I think I've met him.
 

RyoHazuki

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I love the way that no description was deemed necessary for the Neanderthal woman, despite her facial expression conveying more meaning than the other three combined.
 

hunck

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I love the way that no description was deemed necessary for the Neanderthal woman, despite her facial expression conveying more meaning than the other three combined.
There's probably more information on her at the museum not included in the Mirror report.

Bearing in mind the skull could be anywhere up to 60,000 years old, there may be not so much to be gleaned. With the other examples complete skeletons were found.
 

Swifty

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Brighton Museum's New Archeology Gallery Reconstructs Faces of Ancient Britons From South Coast

Forensic artist and sculptor, Oscar Nilsson, and the museum's senior keeper of collections, Richard Le Saux, have worked painstakingly for 14 months to not only bring the people back to life but also to tell their stories.

Patcham Woman - 210AD

A nail was embdedded into the back of her skull and Richard says she was impaled either just before or just after death.

Around this time there was concern that the body or spirit could rise after death and corpses were imapled with nails to fix the body into the grave.

There were further nails scattered in her grave, mainly by her knees, and she was found buried toe to toe with a man.



Whitehawk woman - lived 5,650 years ago

Her bones were found in 1933 in what now makes up part of Brighton race course.

She was a small and slender woman with dark skin and eyes.

Experts believe she was between 19 and 25-years-old when she passed away.

Tragically, the bones of a baby were found in her pelvis, indicating she died in childbirth, and was buried with good luck charms in her own grave.



Ditchling Road man - lived 4,287 years ago

This Bronze Age man is believed to be from the Beaker people, who died when he was between 25 and 35.

Life was tough for this chap. When he was aged between six and nine he suffered extreme malnutrition.

This meant he was gaunt and slightly shorter than average at just 5ft 6ins.

DNA results also show he had lost some teeth and was suffering from extreme tooth decay.



Neanderthal Woman



More at link.
That's brilliant sculpting. On a side note, the gaunt fellow with the beanie hat looks like a young Jason Mewes.
 

AlchoPwn

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The Inuit word for those is "ilggaak ", and they make them with only one slit, not a cross.
 
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