Forgotten History

Cochise

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Brighton Museum's New Archeology Gallery Reconstructs Faces of Ancient Britons From South Coast

Forensic artist and sculptor, Oscar Nilsson, and the museum's senior keeper of collections, Richard Le Saux, have worked painstakingly for 14 months to not only bring the people back to life but also to tell their stories.

Patcham Woman - 210AD

A nail was embdedded into the back of her skull and Richard says she was impaled either just before or just after death.

Around this time there was concern that the body or spirit could rise after death and corpses were imapled with nails to fix the body into the grave.

There were further nails scattered in her grave, mainly by her knees, and she was found buried toe to toe with a man.



Whitehawk woman - lived 5,650 years ago

Her bones were found in 1933 in what now makes up part of Brighton race course.

She was a small and slender woman with dark skin and eyes.

Experts believe she was between 19 and 25-years-old when she passed away.

Tragically, the bones of a baby were found in her pelvis, indicating she died in childbirth, and was buried with good luck charms in her own grave.



Ditchling Road man - lived 4,287 years ago

This Bronze Age man is believed to be from the Beaker people, who died when he was between 25 and 35.

Life was tough for this chap. When he was aged between six and nine he suffered extreme malnutrition.

This meant he was gaunt and slightly shorter than average at just 5ft 6ins.

DNA results also show he had lost some teeth and was suffering from extreme tooth decay.



Neanderthal Woman



More at link.
I'm curious to know how they knew the colour of their eyes, hair, skin etc. Is it possible to work that out from DNA? I'm only being nit-picky, the sculptures are brilliant.
 

hunck

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I'm curious to know how they knew the colour of their eyes, hair, skin etc. Is it possible to work that out from DNA? I'm only being nit-picky, the sculptures are brilliant.
Don't know the answer to this, & am not sure anyone knows for certain. As regards more ancient finds:

There was Cheddar Man, approx 10,000 old, widely pronounced to have had dark skin. It's probably more accurate to say various genes in his DNA pointed towards this conclusion. This article from National Geographic says:

new analysis of the ancient man's DNA proves he's genetically similar to other dark-skinned individuals from the Mesolithic era found in Spain, Hungary, and Luxemborg whose DNA has already been sequenced.
On the other hand New Scientist casts doubt..

one of the geneticists who performed the research says the conclusion is less certain, and according to others we are not even close to knowing the skin colour of any ancient human.
It goes on to say that analysis of the same genes in southern Africans, where skin colour varies more that many people appreciate, didn't account for the various skin tones found & that skin colour was therefore affected by other genes which they hadn't identified.

"known skin pigmentation genes, discovered primarily in E. Asian & European populations, don't explain the variation in skin pigmentation in African populations . The idea that there are really only 15 genes underlying skin pigmentation isn't correct".
 

hunck

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Archive shows medieval nun Joan of Leeds faked her own death to escape convent

A team of medieval historians working in the archives at the University of York has found evidence that a nun in the 14th century faked her own death and crafted a dummy “in the likeness of her body” in order to escape her convent and pursue – in the words of the archbishop of the time – “the way of carnal lust”.

A marginal note written in Latin and buried deep within one of the 16 heavy registers used by to record the business of the archbishops of York between 1304 and 1405 first alerted archivists to the adventures of the runaway nun. “To warn Joan of Leeds, lately nun of the house of St Clement by York, that she should return to her house,” runs the note written by archbishop William Melton and dated to 1318.

Melton, writing to inform the Dean of Beverley about the “scandalous rumour” he had heard about the arrival of the Benedictine nun Joan, claimed that Joan had “impudently cast aside the propriety of religion and the modesty of her sex”, and “out of a malicious mind simulating a bodily illness, she pretended to be dead, not dreading for the health of her soul, and with the help of numerous of her accomplices, evildoers, with malice aforethought, crafted a dummy in the likeness of her body in order to mislead the devoted faithful and she had no shame in procuring its burial in a sacred space amongst the religious of that place”.

After faking her own death, he continued, “and, in a cunning, nefarious manner … having turned her back on decency and the good of religion, seduced by indecency, she involved herself irreverently and perverted her path of life arrogantly to the way of carnal lust and away from poverty and obedience, and, having broken her vows and discarded the religious habit, she now wanders at large to the notorious peril to her soul and to the scandal of all of her order.”

Professor Sarah Rees Jones, principal investigator on the project, said the story of Joan’s escape, which she and her team discovered last week, was “extraordinary – like a Monty Python sketch”.

The scribes did not record whether Joan was returned to the convent or not. “Unfortunately, and this is really frustrating, we don’t know the outcome of the case,” said Rees Jones. “There are quite a lot of cases of monks and nuns who left their religious house. We don’t always get the full detail or know what the outcome was.”

A History of the County of York recounts how in 1301 a nun at the priory of St Clement named Cecily met “certain men” at the priory gate leading a saddled horse, “and, throwing off her nun’s habit, put on another robe and rode off with them to Darlington, where Gregory de Thornton was waiting for her, and with him she lived for three years or more”.

Although parts of some of the archbishops’ registers have been published in the past, they were generally untranslated from Latin. Funding of almost £1m from the Arts and Humanities Research Council means the Borthwick Institute for Archives at the University of York, in partnership with the National Archives, is now working to translate the 16 books and make their contents available online.

During the middle ages, the parchment volumes were carried by the archbishop’s officials while he travelled. After the English civil war in the 17th century, they were stored in London and returned to York in the late 18th century. Covering what Rees Jones calls “a fascinating and extremely turbulent period”, the volumes also span the Black Death, which ravaged Europe between 1347 and 1351.

“Being a priest was one of the most dangerous jobs in Europe during that time as they visited the sick and administered last rites at deathbeds,” said Rees Jones. “Because so many priests had died, there weren’t enough people trained in Latin, so delivering sermons in English had to be adopted as the new status quo. The registers may shed new light on what it was like to live through this period and will perhaps give us a sense of how the church reasserted its authority after such catastrophic events.”
 

Swifty

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I'm fond of the anecdote that when the American troops first arrived in the UK, begrudged locals described them as "Over paid, over sexed and over here!" to which the Americans responded by describing us as "Under paid, under sexed and under Eisenhower" ..
 

Yithian

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I'm fond of the anecdote that when the American troops first arrived in the UK, begrudged locals described them as "Over paid, over sexed and over here!" to which the Americans responded by describing us as "Under paid, under sexed and under Eisenhower" ..
Eisenhower was about as pro-British as an American could be and still be eligible for the job of supreme commander. He had a good relationship with Churchill (they argued but remained friends), Alanbrooke didn't mind him and Monty didn't dislike him personally (which is the next thing down from friendship when it came to Monty). He was careful to assuage British fears / pander to the British papers when it had to be done, yet still he got flack for the simple reason that he was 'taking over' what some of British public had come to view as their show.

A good man; a good diplomat; a very good president.
A better-than-average U.S. general--and they had some stinkers during the Second World War.

Mark Clark, for instance.
 

maximus otter

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I'm curious to know how they knew the colour of their eyes, hair, skin etc. Is it possible to work that out from DNA? I'm only being nit-picky, the sculptures are brilliant.
Brighton Museum reconstructs woman found in Brighton and - mirabile dictu! -she was dark-skinned.

I’ve been to Brighton, and the only mild surprise is that they didn’t depict all of them as minorities. lf they found a Saxon warrior complete with chariot, they’d reconstruct him as “A lesbian vegan holistic masseuse of colour, rocking a wheelchair”.

maximus otter
 
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I’ve been to Brighton, and the only mild surprise is that they didn’t depict all of them as minorities. lf they found a Saxon warrior complete with chariot, they’d reconstruct him as “A lesbian vegan holistic masseuse of colour, rocking a wheelchair”.

maximus otter
You left out Trans.
 

Austin Popper

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A handbook issued to WW2 U.S. troops stationed in Britain:

http://hardscrabblefarm.com/ww2/britain.htm
Great find!

Having known a good many representatives of the target audience, and quite a few for whom this was surely assigned reading, I'd say whoever wrote this nailed it. The language and the approach were no doubt spot-on for the time and the troops. Most of the ones I knew would have had essentially zero experience with any actual British person, and it wasn't a lot different for me growing up in the Midwest in the 60s. My uncle who was a B-17 tail gunner had probably not been more than about 100 miles from his home in rural Minnesota at the time he enlisted. I know he went through quite a bit of culture shock when he got to England. I wish I knew more about his experiences, but like most of the WWII vets I knew, he really didn't like talking about it. Everyone respected that.
 

Frideswide

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Brighton Museum reconstructs woman found in Brighton and - mirabile dictu! -she was dark-skinned.
So you want them to fiddle the likelihoods so that Rattled of Tunbridge Wells doesn't twist her pearls so tight she throttles herself? :rollingw:

I saw a set of the reconstructions in the Mail on line. One of them was dark. What's the problem? Hunck's post above sets out where we are at the moment in the science.
 
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Brighton Museum reconstructs woman found in Brighton and - mirabile dictu! -she was dark-skinned.

I’ve been to Brighton, and the only mild surprise is that they didn’t depict all of them as minorities. lf they found a Saxon warrior complete with chariot, they’d reconstruct him as “A lesbian vegan holistic masseuse of colour, rocking a wheelchair”.

maximus otter
Errr, darker skin was the norm in early populations. Light skin colour only came into Europe with a migration from the Steppes about 6,000 BCE
 

Swifty

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Great find!

Having known a good many representatives of the target audience, and quite a few for whom this was surely assigned reading, I'd say whoever wrote this nailed it. The language and the approach were no doubt spot-on for the time and the troops. Most of the ones I knew would have had essentially zero experience with any actual British person, and it wasn't a lot different for me growing up in the Midwest in the 60s. My uncle who was a B-17 tail gunner had probably not been more than about 100 miles from his home in rural Minnesota at the time he enlisted. I know he went through quite a bit of culture shock when he got to England. I wish I knew more about his experiences, but like most of the WWII vets I knew, he really didn't like talking about it. Everyone respected that.
Yeah, even though it's now 2019 I do recognise the England described in that booklet. As I've been told, the Brits and the U.S. troops were constantly teasing each other but were also very fond of each other. A fun Cromer story I was told by an elderly English chap who used to be stationed in the building I was later living in was:

In between Cromer and East Runton on the coastal road, there used to be two army camps .. the first one for the Americans and next door to that, one for the Brits.

One day, the Americans amended their sign so underneath the name of their place was written 'Second To None' .. the Brit soldiers spotted this so underneath their sign they simply wrote 'None' .. classic banter (when we weren't all shooting at German planes) :sold:.

One lasting legacy of the American troops being stationed here in such large numbers is that people still call each other 'buddy' instead of 'mate' like most of the rest of England. I was told that by Donnie who remembers the day our church was bombed because he was one of the lads helping to "sweep up" afterwards.

Two images of Cromer's Church Street from the next day ..


achurchst01.jpg

achurchst02.jpg

Donnie still lives about 50ft 'behind' the right hand side of the bottom picture. After the war, he was one of our lifeboat men, he's in his 90's now and you'll still sometimes spot him with his radio listening into the lifeboat shouts looking out to sea and reading the wave patterns.
 
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hunck

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Brighton Museum reconstructs woman found in Brighton and - mirabile dictu! -she was dark-skinned.

I’ve been to Brighton, and the only mild surprise is that they didn’t depict all of them as minorities. lf they found a Saxon warrior complete with chariot, they’d reconstruct him as “A lesbian vegan holistic masseuse of colour, rocking a wheelchair”.

maximus otter
Yeah, like those politically correct idiots at University College London & Natural History Museum who decided that Cheddar Man was likely dark skinned. What do they know eh?..


 

hunck

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No skull so we won't get a similar reconstruction of the Red Lady of Paviland. Although I suppose she is now part of the conspiracy having been discovered to be the Red Man of Paviland.
I liked this from the Wiki page:

When the creationist Buckland discovered the skeleton in 1823, his treatise misjudged both its age and gender. Buckland believed that human remains could not be older than the Biblical Great Flood, and thus wildly underestimated its true age, believing the remains to date to the Roman era. Buckland believed the skeleton was female largely because it was discovered with decorative items, including perforated seashell necklaces and jewellery thought to be of elephant ivory but now known to be carved from the tusk of a mammoth. These decorative items, combined with the skeleton's red dye, caused Buckland to mistakenly speculate that the remains belonged to a Roman prostitute or witch.
How wrong you can be..
 

Lord Lucan

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A little bit of Australian history that may or may not be true, certainly the players in the story are, as is the legend of Lasseter's Reef, a supposed gold reef in the middle of Australia some 16 km in length. The story has many Fortean aspects to it of the 'lost mine', 'gold fever', 'mysterious character' type. A brief outline of the story may be found here: The Story of Lasseter's Reef at Wikipedia
My father who died in 1985, told me that he once did business with Harold's son Bob and naturally the topic of conversation eventually came around to his famous father. Bob told mine that he was convinced his father was telling the truth and that somewhere out there, there is a fortune in gold just waiting to be (re) discovered.
 

Ladyloafer

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I don't know if this lady has been mentioned before, I did search and nothing much came up.

https://www.alohawanderwell.com/

Aloha Wanderwell was an explorer, a vaudevillian and filmmaker, a female Indiana Jones, a wife and mother. She visited places no western man or woman had seen before. She was a figure of controversy, self-invention and marketing. The romance that informs her legend is both real and contrived.

Aloha responded to an ad declaring “Brains, Beauty & Breeches – World Tour Offer For Lucky Young Woman… Wanted to join an expedition!”, meeting Captain Wanderwell in Paris and securing a seat on this daring expedition.
Born in 1906 in Canada, she was the first woman to drive around the world, travelled to 43 countries at the age of 16, and filmed it. With her husband she explored the Amazon by plane, and spent months living with and photographing and filming 'stone age' tribes there.

wanderwell-portrait-car-300x300.jpg
 

maximus otter

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Aloha responded to an ad declaring “Brains, Beauty & Breeches – World Tour Offer For Lucky Young Woman… Wanted to join an expedition!
Isn’t it depressing to know that, in 2019, the expedition would have been sued out of existence by the legion of the perpetually-offended before it even left Milton Keynes?

maximus otter
 

Xanatic*

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Netflix will be removing real-life disaster footage from their film Bird Box, due to protests.
What I find interesting is that this is being removed from a finished film, as well as from a film which I think only exists in streaming form. Similarly I wonder if unpopular people might disappear from streaming films, or be altered a la the mammy character from Tom & Jerry.
 
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