Forgotten History

EnolaGaia

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Jeez, folks ... Has 2020 dulled your Fortean instincts? ... :roll:

I'm surprised no one's yet mentioned the cellphone in Annie's right hand (cf. the photo with the cat).
 

Kondoru

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The cat looks very calm or is that a `before` photo?
 

EnolaGaia

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The cat looks very calm or is that a `before` photo?
I repeat ...

Here's a photo of Ms. Taylor with the cat, taken minutes after fishing the cat and barrel out of the water.
 

Xanatic*

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In 1920 a man named Charles Stephens went over the falls in a barrel. For stabilisation he had strapped his arms to the inside of the barrel, and placed an anvil at his feet.
When they found the barrel downstream, he wasn't in it anymore. Just his arms.
 

Kondoru

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The Cat is saying "thank you for rescuing me from the washing machine, -and here I was thinking it was a good comfy place to sleep..."
 

EnolaGaia

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EnolaGaia

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Annie Taylor designed her barrel with an anvil attached at one end to help keep it upright, but she didn't attach the weight to herself.

As I understand it Stephens' barrel hit rocks and was broken during the initial fall, then became trapped in the underwater eddies behind the falls.
 

Frideswide

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I like Hamblin's work. But this? For MW? :dunno::dunno::dunno:
 

Mikefule

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Probably later [than 1920 to 50s] rather than earlier going by the fact it has FROZEN FOODS on it
I would have thought that, but I've just done some reading:

The very first working refrigerating machine, working on different principles from a modern one, was invented in 1755. Like most useful things, it was invented by a Scotsman: William Cullen. It did not find a practical application, but it worked.

The modern technique of using a compressor and refrigerant was proposed in 1805 and a working model was made by 1834, although it was not a commercial proposition. The first commercial ice making machine was produced in 1854.

The modern domestic refrigerator was developed before the first world war. By 1927, a model was introduced that went on to sell a million units.

So an estimate of 1920s - 50s for the brass shopping list gadget is not unreasonable. The sort of person who had a brass shopping list gadget (rather than a simple handwritten list) would probably be fairly wealthy and what we now call an "early adopter" so it is entirely reasonable that someone in the 20s–50s would have used the device shown.
 

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I would have thought that, but I've just done some reading:

The very first working refrigerating machine, working on different principles from a modern one, was invented in 1755. Like most useful things, it was invented by a Scotsman: William Cullen. It did not find a practical application, but it worked.

The modern technique of using a compressor and refrigerant was proposed in 1805 and a working model was made by 1834, although it was not a commercial proposition. The first commercial ice making machine was produced in 1854.

The modern domestic refrigerator was developed before the first world war. By 1927, a model was introduced that went on to sell a million units.

So an estimate of 1920s - 50s for the brass shopping list gadget is not unreasonable. The sort of person who had a brass shopping list gadget (rather than a simple handwritten list) would probably be fairly wealthy and what we now call an "early adopter" so it is entirely reasonable that someone in the 20s–50s would have used the device shown.
Here's a couple more ..

ashoppinglist2.jpg


ashoppinglist3.jpg
 

Swifty

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An interest subject and some victorian examples are intriguing:

View attachment 31762

The one item I was surprised to see listed is curry!
I looked it up and the first mass produced home freezers came on the market just after WW2. I bet there's someone who collects these metal shopping lists.

I've just had to look up Hominy and Sago. I didn't know margarine has been around for so long, I'd always assumed it was a '70's invention what with the 'is this butter or margarine?' TV adverts in the '70's.
 
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Comfortably Numb

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The one item I was surprised to see listed is curry!
This is a tangent which I wanted to follow up and came across the following:

Dripping, apples and milk: Making curry the Victorian way
By Lauren Potts
BBC News
17 January, 2015

A Victorian curry recipe featuring sour apples and dripping has surfaced in East Yorkshire. It is one of the more extreme examples of how Indian cuisine has evolved in British hands.

On page 77 of a notebook belonging to a domestic servant from East Yorkshire, there is a recipe for curry.

Eleanor Grantham's Victorian version of Indian cuisine combines half a pound of meat, two sour apples and a cup of milk with unspecified amounts of dripping, onions and curry powder.

But while its ingredients are unlikely to get mouths watering in the way a modern Madras might, it was good enough to grace the dinner table of Manor House in Willerby in 1890.

"The earliest British recipe for curry was 1747, which is a lot earlier than this recipe, but as far as the region is concerned, it's the earliest recipe we've found," said Sam Bartle, collections officer at the East Riding Archive where the recipe was discovered.

"I'm told the Victorians were quite keen on curry - it was the height of the British Empire so there were interactions with places like India, so it's not surprising."

[...]

"Curry powder is probably an English product, because we didn't have all those spices in those days, because they were expensive of course.

[...]

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-humber-30718727
 

Comfortably Numb

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I bet there's someone who collects these metal shopping lists.
Most certainly, they are eminently collectable I would have thought. I know there is a large collectors market for antique jelly moulds and butter presses, etc.

Lovely things and surprised I have never seen one on Bargain Hunt or its many subsequent derivatives.
 

Comfortably Numb

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The one item I was surprised to see listed is curry!
I noted that also included therein is 'BOVRIL, OXO'.

Sufficiently intrigued, I have looked into the history of both and they are extraordinary stories, especially the latter.

If of interest and trusting on topic:

A brief history of Bovril
Source: BBC - Stoke and Staffordshire
Date: 19 October, 2096

http://www.bbc.co.uk/stoke/content/... invented by a,known as Johnston's Fluid Beef)

Taking stock - The OXO story
Source: Kent Life
Date: 19 July, 2010

https://www.kent-life.co.uk/people/taking-stock-the-oxo-story-1-1639171
 

maximus otter

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Bovril was invented...in the 1870s.

The name Bovril comes from a name found in a book by the inventor
.”

Quality, in-depth research there.

The book was The Coming Race, by Edward Bulwer-Lytton. lt was published in 1871, and uses the idea of a mystic form of energy known as vril.



“Scientific execution” to obtain a scientific drink

Helena Blavatsky read between its lines, and thought that Bulwer-Lytton was describing lightly-fictionalised history. She ran with that ball, and the keen Fortean can follow it all over the park, from George Bernard Shaw to German WW2 missile technology...

maximus otter
 

Comfortably Numb

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JamesWhitehead

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some victorian examples are intriguing
That takes me back. I recall that an Aunt did have one of those indicators on the side of her kitchen cabinet. They were not exactly portable, so you would still need a shopping-list.

Grannie, so far as I can remember, did not have one but she was the proud owner of a set of pantry drawers in the fashionable dark green of the day - possibly as late as the 1930s. Every drawer had a miniature plaque for the ingredients, many of which were going out of fashion or gone.

"Farina," meant fine flour - usually potato starch; there were umpteen slimy things for milk puddings . . . I just hope the white lead and ammonia were kept elsewhere! o_O
 

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That is awesome! Thank You!

It occurs that courtesy of our Forteana Forums, I am probably now more conversant with the history of Fray Bentos corned beef, SPAM, Bovril and Oxo, than I am concerning Scottish history.
Try here for Victorian food brands still extant, for even more info.

BTW, The Japanese have eaten curry since The Meiji Period (1868–1912).

The 1st curry house in the UK, was oepned by Mahomed Dean in 1810

Even Queen Victoria enjoyed her curry nights.
 
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JamesWhitehead

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The 1st curry house in the UK, was oepned by Mahomed Dean in 1810
Details of this venture are disappointingly sparse. He seems to have been well ahead of his time, in serving curries, though it appears to have been an adjunct to his coffee-shop business.

Veeraswamy is usually credited as the practical start of the wave of interest in "Indian" cuisine in the UK.

I have a 1950s cookery-book, half-and-half Indian and Chinese cuisine - turn it upside-down for one or the other - in which Veeraswamy is cited as the only UK source (mail-order) of many of the ingredients! :dinner:
 
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