Fortean Art

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Anonymous

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#61
the [link?]

It was in the gerneral forteana section, under the heading "Haunted Painting."

The post that had the mention of FitzHugh seems to not be there though, so I either DID confabulate it, or the poster had their posts deleted.

The thread goes on from the point that I had read it [I didn't subscribe to it, so I didn't follow it] to name the artist [NOT FitzHugh] and even includes an interview with him...


There I am, color me idiotic!


Trace [Rumor Monger] Mann
 

skitster

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#62
Re: Paintings of Horror and Mystery ...

Originally posted by Gloria X


Posters are invited to attach images or links so that everyone can feel the awe...
Oh, coming in late on this one but... Arthur Rackman did some strange and haunting illustrations in his time, mainly for children’s books and fairy tales: http://www.twildawn.net/Fairies/ArthurRackmanFairies.html

I've had a soft spot for Richard Dadd for many a year too, partly because he was incarcerated in Broadmoor which is near to where I grew up. His art has a pacitularly twisted beauty:

http://www.artmagick.com/thumbs/dadd.aspx

I own at least three books with Dad’s most famous painting on the cover, 'The Fairy Feller's Master Stroke (note the central figure with his back to the viewer, wielding an axe. Dadd murdered his father that way, which is how he ended up in Bedlam then Broadmoor):

http://freespace.virgin.net/nigel.suckling/rdadd1.htm

Then there’s Louise Wain, a Victorian artist who drew cats for greetings cards until madness claimed him:

http://www.lilitu.com/catland/gallery2.shtml

And there there’s the wizardly works of proto-Chaos magician Austin Osman Spare :

http://banger.com/spare/graf/index.html
 

Mighty_Emperor

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#63
Rrose Selavy said:
Yes, that's right . there are bigger pictures here, Also a version by HR Giger http://www.stmoroky.com/reviews/gallery/bocklin/iotd.htm
Excellent page - I have the Giger picture in a series of posters (31x44 cm) with a short discussions by Giger. The painting is called 'Hommage a Bocklin' (painted 1977) and he calls the original Die Toteninsel (the Island of Death). He says "In all four Bocklin originals there is a small rowing boat just in fornt of the gate and sitting in it is a figure clothed in a white shirt. As a child I always thought this was the dead Christ, just as I always believed that the coach-driver wearing the black top-hat up on the hearse was the corpse and therefore the one to whom we should be paying our respects" - interestingly he doesn't actually include the figure in his version.

There is a great set of Bocklin paintings online here (he touches on a number of Fortean themes):

http://community.webshots.com/album/2659261pgvUYREPHl

Emps
 

PeniG

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#64
Re: the [link?]

ZPumpkinEscobar said:
There I am, color me idiotic!
Naw, not idiotic. This is how rumors happen - a crossed wire, an incomplete bit of information, a big of undigested beef - and it was a plausible one, which is why it intrigued me so. Anyone can do it. Lord knows I've done some rumormongering in my time.

And we can now return this thread to its original purpose. Unfortunately I can't contribute now, because I don't know anything about art. I don't even know what I like. I can barely read a comic book, and tend to skim the pictures in a picture book. Very much a text-based person.

Oh, wait - Maurice Sendak's not on this list. You may remember the Wild Things as cuddly, but check out the horrifying Oliver Hardy cooks in *In the Night Kitchen* ("Milk in the batter! Milk in the batter!") And the goblins in *Outside Over There,* which is a book that got mixed reviews - a number of intelligent and perceptive adults and children hated it, but my stepdaughter, when she came to visit at the age of five, made me read it to her over and over and over. If you read the book carefully, you see that it makes sense forward and backward, and Sendak himself claims that the book is printed backward. Sorry, I can't find a good link. There has to be one, but nothing is responding in search mode.

Darn computer fairies...
 

Onix_Martinez

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#65
Not really scary...

but phantasmagorical and ethereal, Remedios Varo is one of my favourite artists, along with Dali and Ernst. I find some of her images disturbing for some reason, but in the end also very pleasant.

Here's a link to a gallery of her works:

http://www.turingmachine.org/remedios/expo.html

Tell me what you guys think.
 

Bannik

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#67
Re: Not really scary...

Onix said:
Tell me what you guys think.
I like them Onix. They remind me of the album cover to Grisman's Mondo Mando. I used to stare at that for hours when I was a kid trying to figure out what it all meant.
Edit: Tbh the figures remind me in some way of the beings I wrote about here. :eek:
 

Onix_Martinez

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#68
Re: Not really scary...

Onix said:
but phantasmagorical and ethereal, Remedios Varo is one of my favourite artists, along with Dali and Ernst. I find some of her images disturbing for some reason, but in the end also very pleasant.

Here's a link to a gallery of her works:

http://www.turingmachine.org/remedios/expo.html

Tell me what you guys think.
Hail Emperor. Good choice.
 

Onix_Martinez

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#69
Re: Re: Not really scary...

Bannik said:
I like them Onix. They remind me of the album cover to Grisman's Mondo Mando. I used to stare at that for hours when I was a kid trying to figure out what it all meant.
Edit: Tbh the figures remind me in some way of the beings I wrote about here. :eek:
Sounds interesting Bannik. Yesterday I had something similar, but it was a Nahual (feline therianthrope) jumping in my bed while I was sleeping with my baby boy, intent on getting inside my body. I broke his left ankle and then fougth him and ended up removing his skin and getting inside him. Kinda like a lucid dream. I was jumpy all day afterwards. Maybe I am taking to much valeriana?
 

Bannik

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#70
to Onix - yeah, Valerian only seems to make me jumpy. Your dream reminds me of one I had when I was a kid where I ripped of E.T.'s arm (the one with the light up finger, of course) and beat to him bloody with it and then through him around the room. He had come to abduct me, after all.
 

Onix_Martinez

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#72
Bannik said:
to Onix - yeah, Valerian only seems to make me jumpy. Your dream reminds me of one I had when I was a kid where I ripped of E.T.'s arm (the one with the light up finger, of course) and beat to him bloody with it and then through him around the room. He had come to abduct me, after all.

I remember reading that, great stuff.

Now, anybody finds Alex Ross depictions of superheroes, specually in the Kingdom Come series, so strong and godlike that they could be sinister? I find them pretty imposing
 
A

Anonymous

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#73
There was certainly something ambivilent about the KC Flash that placed him more with the 'Cosmic' characters than with the normal superheroes.

My favorite portrait in there was Orion, the combination of bitterness, weariness, contempt and just sheer disappointment all in the body language is really something.

His 'Marvels' stuff was less godlike.
 

NilesCalder

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#74
The most mysterious painting I can think of is Giorgione's The Tempest which is as much a mystery landscape as mysterious subject matter. What does this dark scene represent and why does it feel like some secret is hidden within?

If feels as much a riddle within an enigma as Poussin's Et in Arcadia Ego.
 
A

Anonymous

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#75
I remember, many years ago, seeing a picture of a sail ship at sea during a storm, with The Flying Dutchman coming out of the fog towards it. The ghost ship wasn't immediately visible, so it had the effect of coming out of the fog when you looked at it. Or so it seemed at the time.

I'd like to find that one again.
 

Jerry_B

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#76
Some of James Ensor's paintings are rather strange and ghoulish, and Otto Dix's prints and paintings about his experiences in the trenches during WWI are pretty horrific.
 
A

Anonymous

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#77
Helen said:
I remember, many years ago, seeing a picture of a sail ship at sea during a storm, with The Flying Dutchman coming out of the fog towards it. The ghost ship wasn't immediately visible, so it had the effect of coming out of the fog when you looked at it. Or so it seemed at the time.

I'd like to find that one again.

Sounds like Gustave Dore... the chap who illustrated 'The Rime of the Ancient Mariner'
 
A

Anonymous

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#78
Can't find it. I've googled for Gustav Dore, but I can't find the picture I'm talking about.:(
 
A

Anonymous

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#84
Nice piccy, but not the right one. Thanks for trying.

The one I remember was in colour, although it wasn't immediately apparent (the print I saw may have been faded, but I thought it was the stormy colours used that made it look more bluey tones). There was a ship being tossed in a gale (oo-er missus!) with lots of foam on top of the waves. The 'real' ship was to the left of the picture, and there was a mass of cloud, fog and spray to the right of the picture, which was partly the Flying Dutchman and partly cloud, fog and spray.

I remember it vividly, but can't remember anything about the painter or the name of the picture. I'm assuming it's the Flying Dutchman but I suppose it could have been any other ghost ship.

Oh, and by the way - Gustav Dore was the inspiration for the murals in Ghost Ship. How's that for synchronicity?:D
 

NilesCalder

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#87
Helen said:
Oh, and by the way - Gustav Dore was the inspiration for the murals in Ghost Ship. How's that for synchronicity?:D
Mention not that movie! :eek: I still have nightmares! :eek!!!!:
 

Mighty_Emperor

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#88
Hugo Cornwall said:
And for the dlight of the discerning connoiseur of fine art engravings of a macabre nature

http://dore.artpassions.net/
Damn there was an old copy of the Dore illustrated Dante in the school library (it turned up when I was in sixth form) and I always meant to steal it but never did - thanks for that link :D

Emps
 
A

Anonymous

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#89
Any one heard of Salvatore Rosa?

Specialist in blasted heath, lonely places with dark undertones and melancholic moods.

Is credited with kicking off the C18th Gothic revival.

LD

Salvatore Rosa
 
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