Fortean Devon

rynner2

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This currently available iPlayer prog may be of interest here:
Secret Britain - Series 3: 3. Devon
Ellie Harrison, Chris Hollins and Denise Lewis explore Devon.

On a journey from an abandoned island on the south coast to the county's most hidden and remote surf spots in the north, Ellie Harrison follows in Drake's footsteps, seeking out Devon's best-kept secrets.

Chris Hollins relives an ancient and long-forgotten purification ritual on Dartmoor, and Denise Lewis uncovers the secret history of the county's most reluctant visitors.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b078j2yj/secret-britain-series-3-3-devon
 

rynner2

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When I started watching that iPlayer presentation, I thought it might be mildly interesting. But I was wrong - it was very interesting! I've lived many years in Devon, north and south, but I learned things I'd not heard before. Especially about the Silver Mines of Combe Martin. Apart from that, there was a secret cave system on Dartmoor - all those underground sequences got my claustrophobia alarm throbbing!

Happily there were lots of open country and sea scenes as compensation. And I never knew the Army had a railway on Dartmoor either!
 

hunck

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When I started watching that iPlayer presentation, I thought it might be mildly interesting. But I was wrong - it was very interesting! I've lived many years in Devon, north and south, but I learned things I'd not heard before. Especially about the Silver Mines of Combe Martin. Apart from that, there was a secret cave system on Dartmoor - all those underground sequences got my claustrophobia alarm throbbing!

Happily there were lots of open country and sea scenes as compensation. And I never knew the Army had a railway on Dartmoor either!

Good programme - the discovery of a new stone circle on Dartmoor in 2009 was interesting amongst the other stuff.
 

Dinobot

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You know, in Australia Devon is the name of luncheon meat, usually as a kids sandwich filler, so when I saw the title "Fortean Devon" I thought "Has the face of Jesus appeared on someones sandwich?"
 

Dinobot

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I knew I had to explain that one better than I did!
 

rynner2

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The Dartmoor legend of the rich Lord who killed his horse and climbed inside for warmth
By Herald_Miles | Posted: July 23, 2017
Video: 5m 04s: Dartmoor's landscape.

There are many spooky stories about Dartmoor that give us the shivers.
But have you ever heard the freaky tale about the aristocrat who killed his own horse during a freak storm - and hid inside in a desperate effort to survive?

It's a tale that's not for the faint-hearted.
Legend has it that Ordulf, Lord of the Manor of Plymstock, was out hunting one day when he became separated from the rest of his party.
The weather turned and his situation became so extreme - he was forced to kill his horse.
Frantic and with no other options left as temperatures plummeted and the rain lashed down, Ordulf disemboweled it and crawled inside for warmth – the 11th-century version of a hot-water bottle.

It was a bad move – he'd have been better with a live horse than a dead one. He was found frozen solid by a group of monks, and it is said that from time to time the rare visitor to this remote corner might still catch a ghostly glimpse of these holy fellows carrying a bier across the wilderness.

But before he perished on that dark night, he left a note stating that whoever found and buried him could have his Plymstock estate.
The monks of Tavistock Abbey found his body and buried him in their grounds. Childe's Tomb was erected to mark the spot where Ordulf - son the of 11th-century Earl of Devon - fell and can still be seen today near Fox Tor Mire.

etc...

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/the...e-for-warmth/story-30450758-detail/story.html
 

Yithian

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Surely he should have realised that his horse would freeze before he reached the first marker?
 

ramonmercado

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Wistman's Wood - I had to Google it! It looks like a stereotypical haunted wood! :eek:

Morons are now destroying Wistman's Wood. It should be fenced off at least temporarily.

Visitors to Dartmoor are being asked to keep out of an ancient woodland to protect the fragile habitat.

People had been camping in Wistman's Wood, making fires and stripping moss from trees, it was claimed in January. The woodland, which covers about nine acres (3.5 hectares), is thought to be the remnants of a forest dating back thousands of years. Natural England's new advice is to "walk around" the wood so it can be enjoyed in the future.

But over the past year the wood has seen an influx of visitors, according to Devon county councillor Philip Sanders, who recorded 400 people on the path through the woods in one day.

"Moss and lichen can take hundreds of years to form, but it only takes five minutes to destroy."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-devon-57602915
 

WeirdExeter

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Morons are now destroying Wistman's Wood. It should be fenced off at least temporarily.

Visitors to Dartmoor are being asked to keep out of an ancient woodland to protect the fragile habitat.

People had been camping in Wistman's Wood, making fires and stripping moss from trees, it was claimed in January. The woodland, which covers about nine acres (3.5 hectares), is thought to be the remnants of a forest dating back thousands of years. Natural England's new advice is to "walk around" the wood so it can be enjoyed in the future.

But over the past year the wood has seen an influx of visitors, according to Devon county councillor Philip Sanders, who recorded 400 people on the path through the woods in one day.

"Moss and lichen can take hundreds of years to form, but it only takes five minutes to destroy."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-devon-57602915
Ancient temperate rainforest in fact:

life-finds-a-way-in-search-of-englands-lost-forgotten-rainforests


"Few people realise that England has fragments of a globally rare habitat: temperate rainforest. I didn’t really believe it until I moved to Devon last year and started visiting some of these incredible habitats. Temperate rainforests are exuberant with life. One of their defining characteristics is the presence of epiphytes, plants that grow on other plants, often in such damp and rainy places. In woods around the edge of Dartmoor, in lost valleys and steep-sided gorges, I’ve spotted branches dripping with mosses, festooned with lichens, liverworts and polypody ferns."

The good news is that it is regenerating on Dartmoor:

"In other places, temperate rainforest is not just surviving, but thriving. At Lustleigh Cleave, a steep-sided common on the river Bovey that was barren pasture on Ordnance Survey maps a century ago, several hundred acres of rainforest has miraculously regenerated. A painting of the summit of Lustleigh Cleave dated 1820 shows it to be bare rocks, a shepherd grazing his flock at its base. When I visited Lustleigh last year, the same spot was so obscured by trees as to be unrecognisable. Common grazing rights appear to have been abandoned, together with the old practice of swaling – burning the gorse and purple moor-grass that carpets swathes of Dartmoor – allowing the woods to return."
 

catseye

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We used to be taken on school trips to Wistman's Wood. I've not been back since, and wish I'd paid more attention at the time. although the sight of those gnarled, practically bonsai'd trees, is still a great memory.

But then I wish I'd paid more attention in school full stop.
 

ChrisBoardman

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I once bought this book about hauntings all over the country, had quite a few in Devon.
 

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ChrisBoardman

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I once bought this book about hauntings all over the country, had quite a few in Devon.
I just got sentimental and bought it on Amazon for £6 inc P&P. Don't know what happened to my original copy.

This book was a sequel, the first only covered hauntings in northern England.
 
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