Fortean Fungi

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#1
Congo Fungi

Giant Mushroom Baffles Experts in Congo

Fri May 28, 2004 09:57 AM ET



BRAZZAVILLE (Reuters) - A giant three-tiered mushroom which measures a meter (yard) across and was found in the tropical forests of the Republic of Congo has left experts in the capital Brazzaville scratching their heads.

"It's the first time we've ever seen a mushroom like this so it's difficult for us to classify. But we are going to determine what it is scientifically," Pierre Botaba, head of Congo's veterinary and zoology center, told reporters on Thursday.

The giant fungi stands 18 inches high and has three tiered caps on top of a broad stem. The bottom cap measures one meter across, the second one 60 cm and the top one is 24 cm wide, Botaba said.

The bizarre-looking mushroom was found in the village of Mvoula about 38 miles from Brazzaville and transported carefully to the capital by the local chief.
http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=oddlyEnoughNews&storyID=5288301

I want to see some pictures!!

Emps
 

James_H

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#2
thanks for posting this, the link on the breaking news didn;t work.
 

gordonrutter

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#3
Re: Congo Fungi

Emperor said:
[Giant Mushroom Baffles Experts in Congo

Fri May 28, 2004 09:57 AM ET



BRAZZAVILLE (Reuters) - A giant three-tiered mushroom which measures a meter (yard) across and was found in the tropical forests of the Republic of Congo has left experts in the capital Brazzaville scratching their heads.

"It's the first time we've ever seen a mushroom like this so it's difficult for us to classify. But we are going to determine what it is scientifically," Pierre Botaba, head of Congo's veterinary and zoology center, told reporters on Thursday.

The giant fungi stands 18 inches high and has three tiered caps on top of a broad stem. The bottom cap measures one meter across, the second one 60 cm and the top one is 24 cm wide, Botaba said.

The bizarre-looking mushroom was found in the village of Mvoula about 38 miles from Brazzaville and transported carefully to the capital by the local chief. Emps
Because of the way mushrooms grow it is not unusual for them to grow
together and merge so there is no reason why there shouldn't be a three
tiered version and as for size no problems there either (largest recorded is
over two metres in diameter) so impressive but nothing more than that. And
why bother quoting the head of the vetinary and zoology Centre - why should
that person know aything about mushrooms - not his job.

Gordon (who does know about mushrooms)
 

TheQuixote

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#4
I know it isn't Congo but still it is good enough for a tenuous link to this, it is a giant mushie for its kind apparently.

Q- who knows naff all about mushrooms. :)

Monster mushroom found in field

A giant mushroom measuring four times the size of a football has been found by a couple in Aberdeenshire.
The unusual find, discovered growing in a field, measures 3ft long and weighs about 9kg.


Scientists have identified the mushroom as a gigantic puff-ball (Calvatia Gigantea), a variety of the fungi rarely found in Scotland.

Ian Wakley, who found the mushroom, said he wanted to eat it but his wife Judith would not let him.

[...]

The couple have handed their mushroom over to scientists at the University of Aberdeen.

Fungi expert Dr David Genney revealed that it was common to find the mushroom in England rather than Scotland.

But he added: "It's an amazing size - you don't come across these everyday.

"A 9kg mushroom is a pretty big one.

"I can't say if it is record or not but it would be interesting to find out."
BBCi News 26/06/04
 

gordonrutter

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#5
Quixote said:
"A 9kg mushroom is a pretty big one.

"I can't say if it is record or not but it would be interesting to find out."

BBCi News 26/06/04
22kg is the record size for this species

Gordon
 

fluffle9

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#6
puffballs are edible too. most spectacular when stuffed.
i wonder how many people a 22kg one would feed!

the thought of cooking giant mushies kind of makes me ponder the possibility of doing a meal of enormous food, with huge mushrooms, fried ostrich eggs and anything else huge that could be found.
 

punychicken

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#7
Fungus is World's Largest Organism

Giant Fungus

What is probably the largest living organism on earth has been discovered in the Malheur National Forest in eastern Oregon. A fungus living three feet underground is estimated to cover 2,200 acres. After testing samples from various locations, scientists say it is all one organism.

One Thousand Football Fields

Officially known as Armillaria ostoyae, or the honey mushroom, the fungus is 3.5 miles across and takes up 1,665 football fields. The small mushrooms visible above ground are only the tip of the iceberg.

Experts estimate that the giant mushroom is at least 2,400 years old, but could be 7,200 years old.

Previously, the world's largest organism was another Armillaria ostoyae, which covers a mere 1,500 acres near Mt. Adams in Washington state.

A Web of Tentacles

Scientists became interested in that section of forest when trees began to die. The honey mushroom uses tentacles, called rhizomorphs, to take water and nutrients from roots, killing trees.

The process benefits the ecosystem by creating clearings where new plants grow. Animals, such as woodpeckers, live in the dead tree trunks. Mushrooms also recycle nutrients
Dry Climate Helps

The dry climate of eastern Oregon discourages competition from new growth, leaving space for mushrooms already established.
Genetically Closer to People

In other research, scientists have determined that fungi are more closely related to human beings and animals than to other plants.

Moreover, while humans and most species are divided into only two sexes, mushrooms contain over 36,000 sexes.
 

lemonpie3

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#8
the thought of cooking giant mushies kind of makes me ponder the possibility of doing a meal of enormous food, with huge mushrooms, fried ostrich eggs and anything else huge that could be found.
How about giant squid?
Saw a TV program (Japanese TV of course - very Clive James) they got one of these 7m long swuid that sometimes get washed up in typhoons. Took it to a famous squid restaurant, had the chef cook it.

It was disgusting. Salty car tyre.
 

fluffle9

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#9
lemonpie said:
How about giant squid?
Saw a TV program (Japanese TV of course - very Clive James) they got one of these 7m long swuid that sometimes get washed up in typhoons. Took it to a famous squid restaurant, had the chef cook it.

It was disgusting. Salty car tyre.
hahahaha. good call - didn't think of animals myself, being a vegetarian. doesn't squid require an awful lot of beating to make it edible, or is that octopus? because on a 7m squid that might take a while.
 
A

Anonymous

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#11
Go the whole hog ( as it were).

Colossal squid

Deep frozen mammoth

Blue whale steaks

All cooked over a sequoia barbecue.



Um, now that I think about it, that menu isn't exactly environmentally friendly.
Oh well, another dream shattered. Sigh.
 
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#12
Monday September 27, 12:07 AM


Gigantic mushroom stuns Swiss scientists

BIRMENSDORF, Switzerland (AFP) - Swiss scientists have discovered what they think may be the biggest mushroom in Europe, a monster fungus the length of eight football pitches and mostly lurking underground.
The mushroom, which covers a whopping 35 hectares (86 acres) area in a Swiss national park near the eastern town of Ofenpass is thought to be more than 1,000 years old, forestry experts say.

The mushroom, which is 800 metres (yards) long and 500 metres wide, is of the armillaria type, according to the Swiss Federal Institute Forest, Snow and Countryside Research (WSL).

It consists of a vast network of sometimes very thick filaments which reach out along the path of tree roots in the mountainous, wooded region.

The visible parts of the mushroom that poke out above the ground or on the boughs of trees are the tip of the iceberg, representing a tiny part of the vast undersoil organism.

Some species within the family are formidable parasites which invade trees, gradually strangling them. They have been blamed for the widespread destruction of pines within the national park, a WSL statement said.

One reason why the fungus may have survived for so long undetected and untroubled is that it is only edible when young, and even then is not a favourite with lovers of mushrooms.
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/040926/323/f3d08.html
 

Min Bannister

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#13
A giant giant puffball found near Polmont.

A countryside ranger has discovered an enormous puffball mushroom weighing almost two stone.

Fiona Wishart, a ranger with Falkirk Council, found the 1st 9lbs (10.6kg) mushroom as she did her rounds at a site near Polmont on Monday.

She needed help from a colleague to carry the 1.5m (59in) mushroom back to their office inside a coat.

They later cut up the mushroom and shared it between 15 people, who took it home to cook.
 

gordonrutter

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#14
A giant giant puffball found near Polmont.
A countryside ranger has discovered an enormous puffball mushroom weighing almost two stone.
Fiona Wishart, a ranger with Falkirk Council, found the 1st 9lbs (10.6kg) mushroom as she did her rounds at a site near Polmont on Monday.
She needed help from a colleague to carry the 1.5m (59in) mushroom back to their office inside a coat.
They later cut up the mushroom and shared it between 15 people, who took it home to cook.
In fact its the biggest one found since the last one they reported on!
Glad these get reported and with photographs too.
 

uair01

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#16
The time of year when you can see fungi in the city. They're weird enough as-is, but in the city they look weirder and more out-of-place.

mush200.jpg In a parking garage (Agaricus sp.)

mush203.jpg Near the road (Agaricus sp.)

mush204.jpg Near the road (Coprinus comatus)

mush205.jpg In a graveyard (Boletus sp.)

mush202.jpg In a city park (Polyporus sp. ?)
 

Jim

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#18
hahahaha. good call - didn't think of animals myself, being a vegetarian. doesn't squid require an awful lot of beating to make it edible, or is that octopus? because on a 7m squid that might take a while.
Squid (calamari) is a bit of a pain to clean, but no beating or tenderizing needed here. It's absolutely delicious when stewed in a well seasoned tomato sauce or dipped in eggs and coated with seasoned bread crumbs then pan fried (not deep fried).
Octopus IMO is tough and chewy and not at all tasty. I've have it had stewed and in salads must be an acquired taste (a bit fishy). Squid has no fishy taste.
 

lordmongrove

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#20
This has to be the best headline of the year. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...vCxAQSbx_zb_zcJ732QeLJ51jY#Echobox=1542903283

Police hunt thief who stole rare 'dementia-easing' mushroom

Police are hunting a thief who stole a rare and highly sought mushroom which is said to alleviate the symptoms of dementia.

Three of the legally protected ‘bearded tooth fungi’ specimens were sliced off trees in the New Forest, in the latest theft of the mushroom in the area.

The fungi’s scientific name is Hericium erinaceus, but it is also commonly referred to as ‘Lion’s mane fungi’ because of its flamboyant long spines that look like a shaggy mane. ...
 
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uair01

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#21
On 9 December we got (at least) three fairy rings (mushroom circles) in our suburban lawns. I still have to determine the species. I guess Hebeloma and Pholiota. Also clusters (not rings) of Hypholoma and Coprinopsis, these are common mushroom weeds.

rings01.jpg rings02.jpg rings04.jpg
 

uair01

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#22
https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2019/02/deadly-mushroom-arrives-canada/581602/

Death-Cap Mushrooms Are Spreading Across North America

Britt Bunyard, the founder, publisher, and editor in chief of the mycology journal Fungi, has tasted a death cap. “Very pleasant and mushroomy,” he told me. “A nice flavor, and then you spit it out.” For the amatoxin poison to begin to work, it needs to enter the intestinal tract. A quick bite without swallowing has little effect.

Amanita phalloides are said to be quite tasty, and a person who eats one could feel fine for a day or two before illness sets in. The poison is taken up by the liver cells, where it inhibits an enzyme responsible for protein synthesis; without protein, the cells begin to die, and the patient may start to experience nausea and diarrhea—symptoms that can easily be attributed to general food poisoning or other ailments. “If the patient doesn’t realize the connection, doesn’t see the illness as a result of eating a mushroom a day or two earlier, it’s a hard diagnosis,” said Vo.

“Because the mushrooms don’t taste bad, they’re probably not meant to be poisonous to ward off being eaten or foraged,” Bunyard said. “Mammals, not even all mammals, are the only ones affected. Some squirrels and rabbits can eat them without being harmed. Why it’s so toxic to humans—who knows? Some poisons are used as communication molecules, and just happen to be poison to us.”
 

EnolaGaia

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#23
Not all fungi are funny ... Some can seriously f**k up other organisms ...

Drugged, Castrated, Eager to Mate: the Lives of Fungi-Infected Cicadas

Beneath the soil, cicadas wait — as long as 17 years — until the right temperature beckons them to the surface. At once, they emerge, like zombies rising from graves. They greet the sun, preparing to molt into adults in coming weeks and then fly off to mate.

Such is a cicada’s simple life — unless it’s been infected.

Massospora, a parasitic fungus, has lurked just below the surface, awaiting the cicada’s exit. When a nymph digs through infected soil, fungal spores cling to its body. As the cicada matures, massospora multiplies, digesting the insect’s insides, castrating it and replacing its rear end with a chalky white plug of spores.

The cicada buzzes on, seemingly unaware it’s a mushroom’s moving minion. It flies, attempting to mate with unusual vigor. Some males even mimic females to attract and spread their spores to male partners — the more infected, the better. And as their hijacked bodies copulate, spores sprinkle to the earth and massospora spreads.

“This really has all the elements of a sci-fi horror story,” Matthew Kasson, a mycologist at West Virginia University, said.
SOURCE: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/28/science/cicadas-fungus-butts.html
 

EnolaGaia

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#24
If it can be demonstrated this fungus / mushroom really can ease the symptoms of dementia, it will become more valuable than (e.g.) truffles.

Police hunt thief who stole rare 'dementia-easing' mushroom

Police are hunting a thief who stole a rare and highly sought mushroom which is said to alleviate the symptoms of dementia.

Three of the legally protected ‘bearded tooth fungi’ specimens were sliced off trees in the New Forest, in the latest theft of the mushroom in the area.

The fungi’s scientific name is Hericium erinaceus, but it is also commonly referred to as ‘Lion’s mane fungi’ because of its flamboyant long spines that look like a shaggy mane. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/20...vCxAQSbx_zb_zcJ732QeLJ51jY#Echobox=1542903283
 

EnolaGaia

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#25
Australian fungi grow bigger and faster by processing gold ... Huh? ...
Fungus Found in Australian Soil Can Oxidize Gold

Fungi present in soil of the so-called Golden Triangle Gold Prospect zone of Australia can oxidize the metal, researchers reported May 23 in Nature Communications. The reaction dissolves gold, after which the fungi precipitate the metal on their surfaces, a process that may help move the metal from deeper deposits in the Earth’s crust closer to the surface.

The result represents a previously unknown role for fungi in biogeochemical cycling, Saskia Bindschedler, a microbiologist from the University of Neuchatel in Switzerland who was not involved in the work, tells the ABC. “What I really like about this paper is that it shows that not only bacteria are able to oxidise inactive metals” ...

“Fungi are well-known for playing an essential role in the degradation and recycling of organic material, such as leaves and bark, as well as for the cycling of other metals, including aluminium, iron, manganese and calcium,” coauthor Tsing Bohu of CSIRO tells the Australian Associated Press. “But gold is so chemically inactive that this interaction is both unusual and surprising—it had to be seen to be believed.” ...

“There is an underlying biological benefit from this reaction,” Bohu tells the ABC. “We found gold-loving fungi can grow faster and bigger relative to other fungi that don’t work with gold.”
SOURCE: https://www.the-scientist.com/news-opinion/fungus-found-in-australian-soil-can-oxidize-gold-65933
PUBLISHED PAPER: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41467-019-10006-5
 

gordonrutter

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#26

skinny

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#27
My bff is about to try shrooms for the first time alone at his home on a Friday night in winter. I'm not sure it's a good idea. If he has a blowout, he's got nobody to buddy for him. I'm staying online on gmail chat but I'm a long way away and have kids with me. Hope he doses conservatively. He's all "well I tried acid and ecstasy and they were fizzers so I'm not expecting anything dramatic". Famous last words.

I've given him this guide, but it's for those sympathetic to magic ritual and with a respect for the mushroom as a sentient entity in its own right. He's definitely hard materialist science, but he said he got some good tips out of it.

 
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