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Kryptonite

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Really enjoyed the mistletoe article. I hadn't realised til I read it last night that I knew absolutely nothing about it. I didn't even knew it grew on other trees.
 

FrKadash

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I haven't picked it up yet as I was travelling over to Ireland on the same day it was due out! Looking forward to getting stuck in when I get back next Friday.
 

macc

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Really enjoyed the mistletoe article. I hadn't realised til I read it last night that I knew absolutely nothing about it. I didn't even knew it grew on other trees.
Yes very good read, was trying to hang on a while before reading this issue, gave up and now almost finished it, no will power.
 

Swifty

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I'll be picking up the new issue tomorrow with a view to renewing my subscription. I probably will, I've had two reminder letters so far although I missed out on the days when you'd get a T Shirt, mug or that pen with mini post it notes inside for subscribing .. the mug would make me happy ..

.. and who's this in this video, is it you Stuneville?

 

Kryptonite

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I found the Headless Horrors of Sandling Road article very interesting - certainly sounds like something very strange was happening at the time (although I'm not sure why something with no head and presumably no sensory organs would need a lantern). I've often wondered about cases were UFOs are seen in the same area over a period of time - if these craft can fly around as quickly as we are told, why would they need to stay in the same area for weeks at a time. Either the area has something they need or find worthy of study, some writers have speculated that some UFOs can 'refuel' from concentrations of quartz in the ground or even ley lines, maybe this could be a motivation for cases where these things seem to hang around the same places for a while. Alternatively, maybe the areas have some weakness in the fabric of space where interdimensional travel becomes easier.

The IHTM story about the Westie dog and the haunted flat was good too- interesting that the 'ghost' speared to be aware of the dog, making me wonder if the witness was seeing the result of the young man experiencing a timeslip in the past and being thrown forward to the 1990s.
 

Sharon Hill

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Gotta say, that cat on the wall just looked normal sized to me.
YES! Me too. I came here to post just that.

Also: A tip. If you mess up a Gingerbread House and it falls apart, just add a dinosaur to the display. Works great.
 

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ChasFink

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Since I'm in the States I have to wait until the next issue is out before I get to my "current" one!

Anyway, with the publication of my letter about John Keel and Candid Camera this issue I feel like I've become one of those cranky old men who are constantly writing to newspapers, magazines, and TV networks. This was my third or fourth published letter in FT - not counting credits for spotting a few errata - and my second in 2018! I'm starting to hear one of those voice-overs from Monty Python when I read my letters now.

Speaking of errata, this issue's editorial page has this:

FT366:11: Richard Cameron of Rusilip spotted a particularly odd typo in the story about missing skier Constantinos Filippidis: "The item refers to a search 'with the aid of helicopters and K-9s', but sources I've read say a helicopter and search dogs."​

Am I missing something? Adding an "s" to the end of "helicopter" is hardly "particularly odd", and K-9 is a common term for police dogs, guard dogs, and the like. Where's the typo?
 

ghughesarch

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K-9 in the UK would almost always refer only to Dr Who's 1970s robot dog. 'Canines' would be a bit too 'scientific' for a news report.
 

ChasFink

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I thought it was something like that; I was just surprised the Americanism wasn't recognized. It's interesting that you say "canines" would be a bit too "scientific". Perhaps so, but I always thought making "canine" into "K-9" was exceedingly juvenile.
 

McAvennie

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Had never looked at mistletoe in that way before... Smut everywhere! :)
 

AgProv

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still re-reading back issues. Interesting "short" in this edition about the range and bewildering variety of food items confiscated by Australian Customs at port of entry. It specifically mentioned whole, dried and prepared bats found in the luggage of people coming in from China and elsewhere in the far east. This rings a bell!
 

EnolaGaia

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K-9 in the UK would almost always refer only to Dr Who's 1970s robot dog. 'Canines' would be a bit too 'scientific' for a news report.
I thought it was something like that; I was just surprised the Americanism wasn't recognized. It's interesting that you say "canines" would be a bit too "scientific". Perhaps so, but I always thought making "canine" into "K-9" was exceedingly juvenile.

The widespread recognition of "K9 / K-9" as a reference to military / police dogs dates back to WW2 and US Army dog handler teams loosely referred to as "K-9 Units."

However ... The pun ("K9 / K-9" = "dog") can be traced back into the 19th century, and those early obscure usages weren't limited to the USA.

The K-9 Corps undoubtedly helped popularize the term, though the usage was around long before the War Dog Program began.

A search of Google Books, for example, found an 1876 issue of Hallberger’s Illustrated Magazine that refers to “the various ways of rendering ‘Canine Castle,’ such as ‘K-nine Castle,’ and, better still, ‘K.9 Castle.’ ”

(Canine Castle was a kennel in London owned by Bill George, a celebrated 19th-century breeder of bulldogs.)

SOURCE: https://www.grammarphobia.com/blog/2013/01/k-9.html
 
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