Getting Horny!

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#1
'Horn' grows on man's head

Shimla, Dec 22 (IANS):

A villager in Himachal Pradesh is attracting a lot of curiosity for the "horn" growing at the back of his head.

"The horn-like growth is about three and a half inches long and started growing at the back of my head some six months ago," says Lekh Ram, 65, of Nalagarh village, some 100 km from here.

A newspaper even carried a picture of the man with the grey coloured "horn" jutting out from his head. Medical records say it is a very rare phenomenon.

The news has started attracting curious villagers from neighbouring villages. Uncomfortable at the attention, Ram ties a turban to hide the growth.

"Initially it was soft but it is now beginning to get harder," Balkrishan Sharma, a local reporter, told IANS.

It isn't clear whether Ram has shown himself to a doctor, but he appears to be healthy otherwise.

A bachelor and a celibate, Ram has served in temples all his life. He claims to have had several mystical experiences.
http://www.newkerala.com/news-daily/news/features.php?action=fullnews&id=3071

Emps
 
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#2
I have been looking around for more information on horned people (was it mentioned in FT?) and only really came up with this:

Was There a Race of People that Had Horns?
Could this just be another coverup by our archeological societies?
Compiled and Edited by Mary Sutherland


Philadelphia

Human skulls with horns were discovered in a burial mound at Sayre, Bradford County, Pennsylvania, in the 1880's. Horny projections extended two inches above the eye-brows, and the skeletons were seven feet tall, but other than that were anatomically normal. It was estimated that the bodies had been buried around A.D. 1200. The find was made by a reputable group of antiquarians, including the Pennsylvania state historian and dignitary of the Presbyterian Church (Dr. G.P. Donehoo) and two professors, A.B. Skinner, of the American Investigating Museum, and W.K.Morehead, of Phillips Academy, Andover, Massachusetts. The bones were sent to the American Investigating Museum in Philadelphia, where they were later claimed to have been stolen and have never been seen again
Pursuit, 6:69-70, July 1973 Mysteries of the Unexplained, p. 39 1992

New York
Giant, horned human skeletons unearthed just south of Elmira and Wellsville, NY

Texas
A 30 + year old male skeleton was unearthed in a mining area of the El Paso area. Skull had two small horns protruding from the forehead area. Witness of this was Texas Ranger investigating another murder case .

Michaelangelo Buonarotti's Moses at the tomb of Julius II. Circa 1513. Note the horns on Moses' head.

At one time the horns were purported to be signs of kingship. Alexander the Great was also depicted with horns on some of his coins

Here we find a possible gene throw back . Picture of 80 year old woman that had horn surgerically removed.
http://www.burlingtonnews.net/hornedrace.html

which has also been updated to take into account the news above.

I believe it also comes up in:

The Two-Headed Boy, and Other Medical Marvels by Jan Bondeson

but I only have A Cabinet of Medical Curiosities :(

Emps
 

stonedog3

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#3
It's traditional in "art" to represent Moses with two horns or twists of hair...

anyone know why?

Kath
 
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#4
stonedoggy: I wouldn't be suprised if the representation of Moses and Alexander with horns isn't harking back to older myhtology - Pan, Ammon, etc.?

I did a little searching and found:

http://penelope.uchicago.edu/pseudodoxia/pseudo59.html

http://209.48.174.77/Robots/V26I3P42-1.htm

http://www.islamic-awareness.org/Quran/Contrad/External/horned.html

http://www.whyprophets.com/prophets/kinghorn.htm

As adopted son of Thermuthis (daughter of Sesostris-Rameses, priestess of Hathor and Neith), and as Regent Potential, he had access to the most secret teachings of the temple. At that time Egyptian worship was directed to the celestial Amon 'who sheds Light on hidden things.' These 'hidden things' comprised much of our 'visible' science -- architecture, geology, biology, astronomy, psychology and medicine -- plus those occult disciplines which deal with the 'invisible' laws and forces which govern our universe.

Here possibly is where the idea of horns originates. For in the Mystery language horns are the sign of the successful neophyte, of one who has passed the dread tests of initiation and quite literally touched divinity.

But later, after the State had taken over the supervision of the Mystery schools, the spirit of their teachings became obscured so that the horn came to symbolize the conqueror of worlds rather than the conqueror of self. Thus Jamshid, builder of Persepolis, was called 'the two-horned.' And Alexander the Great, initiated by the oracle at the desert oasis Temple of Amon in 332 B.C., accepted as an inestimable honor the horned AKKADIAN CYLINDER SEAL headdress. He wore it with pride as did the 'initiated' of the Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans. To them, as to the Vikings, horns meant power of the spirit. So with the Celts who inscribed the likeness of their teacher, Cernunnos, 'the horned,' on a silver plaque, sitting in a Krishna pose and holding this emblem in the form of a ram-headed serpent in his hand.

So with horns, Michelangelo acclaimed Moses a man of power and station far greater than lawgiver of a local tribe. With horns he saluted him not only as one who had stood in the presence of God, and had realized, had become at-one with, his own divinity, but nobler far, as a man fulfilled who had returned -- for some do not. Only the few come back, down the mountain, in order to teach and lead mankind.

The horns themselves are an interesting symbol, for sheep, especially those native to the wild mountain areas of Asia and North America, are surefooted climbers who courageously ascend the most stark perpendiculars; while their domesticated cousins are so gentle that primitive religions readily incorporated them into their art forms. Apollo, Mercury, and later Jesus were all pictured as Good Shepherds with lambs either carried on their shoulders or couching at their feet.

Moses was without doubt accustomed to seeing ram-headed figures painted on the walls of the royal tombs, where they represented the Sun-God, Amon (later Amon-Ra). During the 6th and 7th centuries B.C. this deity was depicted in the likeness of a man, standing or seated as the Moses of Michelangelo, and frequently wearing the headmask of a ram. Those who interpret Egyptian belief explain that he symbolizes first, the Pleroma, the Fullness of things, and then, that creative force in nature which initiates and maintains intelligent life in this and in the lower worlds. For Amon-Ra was also presented enthroned on a solar boat journeying through the twelve hours of the night to illumine the Underworld.

The Greeks used Pan to express this idea. Horned, hoofed, tailed and sometimes bearded, he with his band of exuberant fawns and satyrs perennially disrupt the status quo.
http://www.theosophy-nw.org/theosnw/world/mideast/mi-elo.htm

Emps
 

stonedog3

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#5
Lovely work there Emps... it'll take me a while to work through that lot so I wanted to say thanks straight away!

Kath
 
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#6

inkedmagiclady

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#7
This is a very interesting topic. I was told by a rabbi long ago that Moses had horns because of a mistranslation of a hebrew word.

I found some explanation here.

This image derives from a mistranslation of the Hebrew word qaran
(H7160) in Exodus 34:29 (see also Ex 34:30,35) by Jerome in the Latin
Vulgate. The Brown-Driver-Briggs Hebrew Lexicon says that this Hebrew
verb means to:
1) (Qal) send out rays
2) (Hiphil) display (grow) horns (be fully developed).

Qaran is derived from H7161, which is a noun meaning "horn." Jerome
took the basic meaning of the word and neglected its derived meaning
of "to emit rays." Many times in Hebrew one must assign the meaning of
a word based on its context. In Psalm 69:31 qaran is used to describe
an ox or young bull. There the translation as "horn" is
appropriate. But in Exodus 34:29 qaran is used in conjunction with the
phrase "skin of his face." From the context of following versus the
meaning as "horns" is not supported. The Apostle Paul understood this
to mean "shone" and not "grew horns" as can be seen from II Cor
3:7-13.

As a result of this some Christian representations of Moses can be
found with ram's horns. Further, some have taken this image and used
it in their synthesis of Christianity with the Egyptian Amun and the
Greek Aries to form mystic cults.
 
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#8
Just flicking though FT looking for somehting else and there is a letter in FT167: 55 with a picture and description of a woman with a horn growing from her head. The editors note gives a larger article in FT43:36-40.

Emps
 
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#9
In FT177:50-54 there is a revised and updated article on people with horns originally posted in FT43.

Emps
 

James_H

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#10
I think that human horns are traditionally symbolic of wisdom. Maybe the representation of the devil with horns is meant to be indicative of his cunning?
 
A

Anonymous

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#11
As a teenager I worked as a checkout chick, and one customer came through with a baby who had a horn or growth in its forhead, like an inch long peice of bone growing through the skin of the baby's forehead...probably an inch or so across too. Looked kinda painful, poor little thing.

The mother was actually one of my sister's teachers, but I wasn't game enough to ask her what was wrong with the baby, if it was a horn or tumor or something.
 

Anome

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#14
The Doctor Who story The Daemons mentions Moses being depicted with horns, and claims that they are a symbol of power. (And connects it back to monsters under Glastonbury cathedral.)

Of course, on your Pan/Satyr types, they're often taken as being a sign of, well, horniness. (By association with goats and rams and such.)

Of course, horn and hair are both forms of keratin (as are fingernails), and so what seems to happen in actual cases of horned humans (to my untrained eye) is that something goes wrong in the follicles, making a whole bunch of them grow hairs in such a way that they come out compressed together - ie as horn. Quite what goes wrong, and how it works, I'm not sure.
 
A

Anonymous

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#15
Maeve said:
As a teenager I worked as a checkout chick, and one customer came through with a baby who had a horn or growth in its forhead, like an inch long peice of bone growing through the skin of the baby's forehead...probably an inch or so across too. Looked kinda painful, poor little thing.
One of my relatives had a baby some years ago with the same thing. It did not look like bone, rather like a tumor growning on the top of his head, an inch across and almost as high. It sank as he grew and nowadays it's only a big birthmark under his hair.

The baby was very early born and a bit underdeveloped, but I don't know if that had anything to do with it.
 

gyrtrash

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#18
A man from Ziyuan, southern China has grown a bizarre horn on his head measuring three inches - and it's still growing.
Huang Yuanfan, 84, said the odd growth started two years ago as a small bump but just grew and grew.

The old goat said: ‘I tried picking at it and even filing it but nothing changed it. The horn just kept getting bigger.’
Yuanfan says it has now reached three inches and is showing no signs of stopping.

He added: ‘Doctors say they don't know what caused it but if they try to take it off it will just come back. I try to hide it beneath a hat but if it gets much longer it will be sticking out the top.’

"The old goat..." :roll:

Link - with photo
 

Tribble

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#20
A four-inch 'devil horn' which grew on a man's head after he banged it has finally been removed.
Shyam Lal Yadav, 74, said the unicorn-like horn emerged around five years ago, however he has now had the growth removed.
It was initially kept under control by his barber but the farmer said it soon became hard and got so long he had to seek help from surgeons.


https://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/four-inch-devil-horn-grew-20086390
 

escargot

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#21
When doing hospital/care home work I came across several cancer sufferers with cutaneous horns on their heads. I'd carefully brush their hair round the growths. Why didn't they have the horns cut off? One might wonder. My guess was that at this stage of their illness they had other priorities.
 
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