Global Warming & Climate Change: The Phenomenon

hunck

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Proposal to use empty North Sea oilfields to bury 10m tonnes of CO2

Three of the largest ports in Europe – Rotterdam, Antwerp and Ghent – are to be used to capture and bury 10m tonnes of CO2 emissions under the North Sea in what will be the biggest project of its kind in the world.

The ports, which account for one-third of the total greenhouse gas emissions from the Belgium, Netherlands and Luxembourg region, would be used to pipe the gas into vast cavities about two miles (3km) below the seabed.

It is hoped the project could be completed by 2030 but the scale of the storage, in two empty gas fields, is unprecedented and raises questions about how the CO2 will affect the deep subsurface, according to the Dutch government.

Scientists in Belgium and the Netherlands have largely welcomed the plans.

Prof Mark Saeys of Ghent University told De Morgen newspaper: “Of course I would prefer to see investments in renewable energy, but you have to be realistic: as long as we as a society remain dependent on fossil fuels, underground CO2 storage may be a crucial lever for achieving our climate targets.”

The world’s first large-scale carbon storage project was developed in 1996 off the Norwegian coast, injecting nearly 1m tonnes a year into a space 800 to 1,100 metres beneath the seabed.

But the development of carbon capture and storage has been stilted in Europe. In 2009, the European commission committed €1bn to finance six pilot projects with the hope of having 12 schemes up and running by 2015. Due to the high costs, none of the projects were developed.

More than 70% of the 30m tons of CO2 captured annually by facilities for use or storage is captured in North America.

The largest initiative in the world to date is the Petra Nova project in Texas, which was launched in 2017 and is attached to a coal-fired power station. It has an annual capture capacity of 1.4m tonnes of CO2, the equivalent of the emissions produced by 350,000 cars. The pipeline planned for the European ports project, known as Porthos, would have the capacity to transport 5m tonnes of CO2 a year.
 

maximus otter

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It is hoped the project could be completed by 2030.
Pointless then, as the UN - :bdown: - tells us that we’ll have reached (yet another) irreversible tipping point by 2030.

I was just reading this very morning about how abrupt climate change 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in the population of South America. If only they’d given up cars and jet travel and buried their CO2 under the sea, eh?

maximus otter
 
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ramonmercado

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Pointless then, as the UN - :bdown: - tells us that we’ll have reached (yet another) irreversible tipping point by 2030.

I was just reading this very morning about how abrupt climate change 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in the population of South America. If only they’d given up cars and jet travel and buried their CO2 under the sea, eh?

maximus otter
Maybe Graham Hancock is right about the advanced ancient civilisations!
 

hunck

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I was just reading this very morning about how abrupt climate change 8,000 years ago led to a dramatic decline in the population of South America. If only they’d given up cars and jet travel and buried their CO2 under the sea, eh?

maximus otter
That's a pretty sketchy report. It says there was population decline but doesn't give any details as to how much. It says

While the research shows that there was a significant disruption to population, the study highlights that indigenous people of South America were thriving before and after the middle Holocene.
So nothing very drastic it would seem. It points to rainfall being the driver, with drier weather in some areas affecting crop yields, hence population centres being abandoned, & nothing to do with CO2 increasing.

To equate this fairly localised scenario with worldwide temperatures rising is stretching things a bit.

Frankly it was a surprise to me that CO2 is captured at all, & that the US collects 70% of world capture. I wonder what they do with it - store it in tanks, freeze it?

As far as I know they're not empty.
I dunno - I've read stories about oilfields refilling but don't know if it's actually been shown to be true, or true in the 'empty' fields they're talking about. Maybe you know more than them.
 

ramonmercado

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At least Cromer won't suffer that much given that 90% of it's denizens are amphibians.

England’s flood planners must prepare for the worst on climate change, the Environment Agency has warned.

Its chairwoman, Emma Howard Boyd, said on current trends, global temperature could rise between 2C and 4C by 2100 and £1bn a year would need to be spent on flood management.

She said some communities may even need to move because of the risk of floods.

The government said it would be seeking evidence for its own flood policy in the autumn.

Ms Howard Boyd, launching the consultation on the agency’s flood strategy, said government policy should ensure that all publicly-funded infrastructure is resilient to flooding and coastal change by 2050.

“We can’t win a war against water by building away climate change with infinitely high flood defences,” she said. ...

https://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-48206325
 

maximus otter

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Wanna bring down global temperatures? Ground all passenger planes for two years. Instant cooling.
Nah: How else would Dame Emma Thompson - net worth $50,000,000 - be able to buy an £18,000 ticket to fly from America to Britain, in order to lecture me on that SqueezyJet flight to Italy I took two years ago? She would have to forego the beef carpaccio washed down with Laurent Perrier champagne that she enjoyed on the flight, before haranguing us about going veggie to save the planet.

maximus otter
 

Mythopoeika

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Nah: How else would Dame Emma Thompson - net worth $50,000,000 - be able to buy an £18,000 ticket to fly from America to Britain, in order to lecture me on that SqueezyJet flight to Italy I took two years ago? She would have to forego the beef carpaccio washed down with Laurent Perrier champagne that she enjoyed on the flight, before haranguing us about going veggie to save the planet.

maximus otter
Yes, it's interesting that such people never get the irony or understand the hypocrisy.
 

Mungoman

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I reckon that it's our seas and oceans that is the basis for the earths increased heat retention.

Oceans and seas will radiate 12% of their heat into space, via the atmosphere, and the atmosphere will radiate 59% of its heat into space.

The important thing though, is, can we do something about it.

The other thing is, that until corporations with dollar signs in their scope stop laying waste to the ground, forests and oceans, Nothing of note can really be changed.

And that, as far as I'm concerned, should be the focus....
 

GNC

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Sweet wrapper and plastic bags found in the deepest ocean dive ever:
Rubbish news

This is a real problem. Recycle as much as you can.
 

Yithian

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Sweet wrapper and plastic bags found in the deepest ocean dive ever:
Rubbish news

This is a real problem. Recycle as much as you can.
I'm surprised they didn't find some glitter down there.

Somebody brings a single glitter-bearing object into your house and you'll be spotting little sparkles out of the corner of your eye until kingdom come.
 

hunck

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Here's a Ted talk by a glaciologist studying Greenland

Ice melt from Greenland alone will cause sea level to rise from 20cm to 1m or more in the next 80 years. Impossible to say for sure but according to the science it's going to happen.

 

maximus otter

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l remember years ago seeing some Beeboid in Greenland, pontificating about a glacier having receded so far that the ruins of a Viking-era farm had been exposed, and how Global Warming was going to kill us all in ten fifteen twenty years before long, mark my words!

The only point he didn’t cover was why the glacier had retreated so far 1,200 years ago that the Vikings had been able to build a farm there in the first place.

Odd, that.

maximus otter
 

ramonmercado

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Reporting on the environment may prove lethal.

Thirteen journalists who were investigating environmental issues have been killed in recent years, according to a new study from the Committee to Protect Journalists.

The CPJ says many more journalists covering climate change are facing violence, intimidation, harassment, and lawsuits. As it investigates another 16 deaths, it believes the tally of murders may be as high as 29.

The Guardian points out that such a figure would make this field of journalism “one of the most dangerous after war reporting”.

The CJP report, entitled Green Blood, has focused particularly on the mining industry. Three journalists have died while reporting on the sector in the Phillippines.

There have also been deaths in Tanzania, which has slipped 25 places on the World Press Freedom Index produced by Reporters Without Borders. It now ranks 118th out of 179 countries.

“Journalists [in Tanzania] are attacked without reason,” Ryan Powell, a media development specialist working in Africa, said. “Police will harass journalists, and people do not interfere.”

India is revealed to be one of the most dangerous places to be an environmental journalist – three of the 13 identified as having been killed were from the country.

https://www.theweek.co.uk/101792/en...letter&utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter
 

PeteByrdie

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l remember years ago seeing some Beeboid in Greenland, pontificating about a glacier having receded so far that the ruins of a Viking-era farm had been exposed, and how Global Warming was going to kill us all in ten fifteen twenty years before long, mark my words!

The only point he didn’t cover was why the glacier had retreated so far 1,200 years ago that the Vikings had been able to build a farm there in the first place.

Odd, that.

maximus otter
This is an extremely interesting question, and one that deserves to be framed from the point of view of a curious layman who knows that highly trained scientists with masses of data are likely to know better than him rather than that of a small minded man sitting in an armchair pontificating at the TV.

I know that the Greenland ice sheet is known to have both decreased and increased considerably over time, and seems to respond to relatively small changes in global temperature. So when the Norse settlers first arrived, what conditions did they find? Why was Greenland a worthwhile place for them to settle? I've read somewhere that it's thought they failed to respond to changes in climate, which is why their settlements ultimately failed. But what evidence have we that current changes in the Greenland ice sheet are due to anthropogenic climate change, and not part of an ongoing natural process? Enquiring minds want to know! Smaller minds, as ever, only care about anything as far as it supports views they've already set their hearts on. I'll do some research when I get the chance, but I suspect the answers won't be simple.
 

ramonmercado

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Yeti habitats under threat from climate change.

Declassified Cold War–era spy satellite film shows that the melting of hundreds of Himalayan glaciers has sped up in recent decades.

An analysis of 650 of the largest glaciers in the mountain range revealed that the total ice mass in 2000 was 87 percent of the 1975 mass. By 2016, the total ice mass had shrunk to only 72 percent of the 1975 total. The data show that the glaciers are receding twice as fast now as they were at the end of the 20th century, report Joshua Maurer, a glaciologist at Columbia University, and colleagues June 19 in Science Advances.

The primary cause for that acceleration, the researchers found, was warming: Temperatures in the region have increased by an average 1 degree Celsius from 2000 to 2016.

Meltwater from Himalayan glaciers are a source of freshwater to hundreds of millions of people each year. However, recent studies examining changes in glacier mass from 2000 to 2016 have shown that this store of freshwater is shrinking, threatening future water security in the region (SN Online: 5/29/19).

https://www.sciencenews.org/article..._medium=email&utm_campaign=editorspicks062319
 
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