Greetings! (Ghost of Fort's Introductory Thread)

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Ghost of Fort

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#1
Have been a Fortean since before I quite knew what a "Fortean" was. I became interested in UFOs, Bigfoot, sea serpents, and so forth very young. The movies in the sci-fi and horror genres (pre-gore, note!) helped, I suppose, but I had my first UFO sighting quite young, and was able to see it descend ina a heavilly-wooded area near where we lived then (a national forest, lots of places to come down w/o being seen, especially then). Saw a dis in broad daylight later, and another cone-shaped object a few years later. I loved the original Nimoy In Search Of... TV series, also. Who ever wants to talk, let me know. I'm feeling my way around, so ask that people be patient with me until I learn more of how the Foorum works.
 

Swifty

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#2
Have been a Fortean since before I quite knew what a "Fortean" was. I became interested in UFOs, Bigfoot, sea serpents, and so forth very young. The movies in the sci-fi and horror genres (pre-gore, note!) helped, I suppose, but I had my first UFO sighting quite young, and was able to see it descend ina a heavilly-wooded area near where we lived then (a national forest, lots of places to come down w/o being seen, especially then). Saw a dis in broad daylight later, and another cone-shaped object a few years later. I loved the original Nimoy In Search Of... TV series, also. Who ever wants to talk, let me know. I'm feeling my way around, so ask that people be patient with me until I learn more of how the Foorum works.
Alright mate ? :bananas:
 

Ghost of Fort

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#3
Hi, Swifty. take it the Forum is based in the UK? American myself, for the record. My dad and his uncles al fought in W2, Dad in So.Pacific, the others Europe btw. He's been gone about a decade now, not a huge number US ones left -- over 300 a day passing.

Anyway, back to Forteana. There was a U.S. TV series hosted by John Newland, One Step Beyond, 1957-1959/60, and it featured actual cases of paranormal phenomena. Most are public domain, and can be found online. They did get hoaxed some - there Sasquatch episode, for instance, is one I never have heard of before. recommend the show, though.

I suggest a book by late Brain Ash, The Visual Encyclopedia of Science Fiction some here may be interested in from 1977; has a chapter on "cults" which deals briefly with Charles Fort, UFOs, etc.
 

MrRING

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#4
Greetings - I think I know you from another forum. The mods are friendly, so don't hesitate to ask questions (though don't mention "The War" as so astutely noted by the fine hotelier Basil Fawlty!)
 

Swifty

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#5
Hi, Swifty. take it the Forum is based in the UK? American myself, for the record. My dad and his uncles al fought in W2, Dad in So.Pacific, the others Europe btw. He's been gone about a decade now, not a huge number US ones left -- over 300 a day passing.

Anyway, back to Forteana. There was a U.S. TV series hosted by John Newland, One Step Beyond, 1957-1959/60, and it featured actual cases of paranormal phenomena. Most are public domain, and can be found online. They did get hoaxed some - there Sasquatch episode, for instance, is one I never have heard of before. recommend the show, though.

I suggest a book by late Brain Ash, The Visual Encyclopedia of Science Fiction some here may be interested in from 1977; has a chapter on "cults" which deals briefly with Charles Fort, UFOs, etc.
I think this forum's based in the U.S. at the moment but that's a very long story. Fortean Times magazine itself is U.K. .. thanks for the recommendations.
 

Bigphoot2

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#6
Hi, Swifty. take it the Forum is based in the UK? American myself, for the record. My dad and his uncles al fought in W2, Dad in So.Pacific, the others Europe btw. He's been gone about a decade now, not a huge number US ones left -- over 300 a day passing.

Anyway, back to Forteana. There was a U.S. TV series hosted by John Newland, One Step Beyond, 1957-1959/60, and it featured actual cases of paranormal phenomena. Most are public domain, and can be found online. They did get hoaxed some - there Sasquatch episode, for instance, is one I never have heard of before. recommend the show, though.

I suggest a book by late Brain Ash, The Visual Encyclopedia of Science Fiction s
ome here may be interested in from 1977; has a chapter on "cults" which deals briefly with Charles Fort, UFOs, etc.
That takes me back a bit! I had that book when it came out. And welcome aboard.
 

Ghost of Fort

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#7
I see, Swifty. Can anyone tell me if the early ufologist Leonard G. Cramp is still alive, or, if not, when he died? I know some new editions of his two 1950s UFO titles have appeared in recent years from a press which specializes in public-domain titles, (i.e. Space, Gravity, and the Flying Saucer, and Pieces for a Jigsaw (I think - going by memory here. he'd be around 100 if still with us). Once upon a time, there was the British Book Centre which reprinted U.S. editions of various UK titles, but they seem to have long since faded away. I think the first of these was issued by Citadel Press, which, unless it has sunk recently, is still in business.
 

Ghost of Fort

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#9
Glad to bring back a good memory, Bigphoot2! I checked very briefly, and Citadel Books seems to now be an imprint of Kensington Publishers (Zebra paperbacks, and so forth), so it no longer exists as a separate company.

Have tried literally for years to research Cramp, so will be very grateful for data on the old boy, including an obituary for him, if needed.
Just quickly some of the U.S. ufologist/Fortean I knews at least for a time were the aforementioned Vincent H. Gaddis (1913-1987), and Lucius Farish (1937 - 2012). Farish did the newsletter UFONS(UFO news-clipping service), until he ended it a few years before his passing due to the internet. Didn't always agree, but he was sharp as the proverbial tack. I was on the mailing list of the late James Moseley's Saucer Smear ( a newsletter) for some time; he never seemed abe to decide if he was a skeptic, or a proponent. He became a bit too skeptical for my own taste towards the last few years for reasons he never quite explained clearly, but he was an entertaining character, at least. Will do some more name-dropping later.
 

Ghost of Fort

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#10
Thanks VERY much, Tempest63! That's what I call service. I'll no doubt have a few others to ask about as we go along, but he had been just about top of the list for a long time.

For anybody who goes back to the 1950s, the U.S. science-fantasy digest(for most of its life, anyway) Fantastic Universe, ran a good many UFO articles from 1956 to its premature end in 1960. I suppose best-known writers were M.K. Jessup, and Ivan T. Sanderson. Skeptical items appeared as well as "pro" ones, by sci-fi author Lester del Rey, and others. I recommend the magazine, but note the print is fairly-small. It switched to a slim "pulp-size" format in 1959, and folded with the March 1960 copy. Why, nobody seems to know. Most surviving U.S. sf magazines ended that year, though, and the market never really recovered to anything like it once was. Amazing, Fantastic, Galaxy and (Worlds of) IF all continued for a number of years, an e-format version of Amazing exists at the moment, but most of these have gone to that magazine heaven in the sky long ago, now.
 

Tempest63

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#11
Thanks VERY much, Tempest63! That's what I call service. I'll no doubt have a few others to ask about as we go along, but he had been just about top of the list for a long time.

For anybody who goes back to the 1950s, the U.S. science-fantasy digest(for most of its life, anyway) Fantastic Universe, ran a good many UFO articles from 1956 to its premature end in 1960. I suppose best-known writers were M.K. Jessup, and Ivan T. Sanderson. Skeptical items appeared as well as "pro" ones, by sci-fi author Lester del Rey, and others. I recommend the magazine, but note the print is fairly-small. It switched to a slim "pulp-size" format in 1959, and folded with the March 1960 copy. Why, nobody seems to know. Most surviving U.S. sf magazines ended that year, though, and the market never really recovered to anything like it once was. Amazing, Fantastic, Galaxy and (Worlds of) IF all continued for a number of years, an e-format version of Amazing exists at the moment, but most of these have gone to that magazine heaven in the sky long ago, now.
I couldn’t find an obituary though. Sorry!
 

Ghost of Fort

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#13
On Harold T. Wilkins, I have dates of 1891 to 1966;* can anybody confirm that dod for him? I have recently re-read his two UFO books, and one more of general mysteries nature. Over here, Wikipedia and other sources confuse him with U.K. astronomer H.P. Wilkins (1896-1960), and give Harold's dod as 1960. An old ufologist/librarian friend provided me with the 1966 date for Harold, and he was usually correct. The latters book Mysteries of Space and Time (1955) relates his conversion from UFO skeptic to proponent when he saw a formation from an airliner while here on a speaking tour around 1953. The gent also saw what was called in the 1950s a bridge on the Moon, which nobody has ever really explained, other than it was reported by a number of people, then seemed to vanish! Taken down, perhaps?

*Flying Saucers on the Attack, U.S title,(Flying saucers on the Moon, U.K.) and Flying Saucers Uncensored. He had some decidedly occult-leaning notions, although believed aliens were here as well. I THINK he was the first popular author to mention what seems to have been the Roswell incident from a U.S. Army serviceman correspondent of his in the former, which he does not seem to get acknowledgement for this.
 

AnonyJoolz

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#14
Have been a Fortean since before I quite knew what a "Fortean" was.....
Well of course - as you were the source of the term 'Fortean' :)

Can you tell us, Mr Fort, what's it like on the other side? Is it better than Cromer? And have you met Elvis, Diana and JFK? What's the best way to get ectoplasm out of polyester? (asking for a friend)

Welcome to the earthly plane!
 

Ghost of Fort

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#15
Try Tide laundry detergent - it'll remove just about anything. If THAT fails, try GoJo, an auto-garage cleaner (greasy-junk which will certainly cut through just about any mess)! We learn alot from the otherside, you see.

And now back to lour regular sponsors....
 

EnolaGaia

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#16
Passed in 2009. Very prolific writer from what I have Just witnessed on the web.
Cramp is listed as having died in 2009 according to the ISFDB site, but ...

According to family records posted at both ancestry.com and myheritage.com Leonard George Cramp was born in 1919 and died in 2006. These posted family records include the same Cramp photo appearing in a 1962 news article appearing in his book The A.T. Factor: Piece for a Jigsaw III.

https://books.google.com/books?id=v...AQ#v=onepage&q="leonard george cramp"&f=false
 

EnolaGaia

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#18
On Harold T. Wilkins, I have dates of 1891 to 1966;* can anybody confirm that dod for him? I have recently re-read his two UFO books, and one more of general mysteries nature. Over here, Wikipedia and other sources confuse him with U.K. astronomer H.P. Wilkins (1896-1960), and give Harold's dod as 1960. An old ufologist/librarian friend provided me with the 1966 date for Harold, and he was usually correct. ...
I can't find any source that lists Harold Tom Wilkins' date of death as 1966.

The most specific citations consistently give his date of death as January 29, 1960. The only variant I found was a single source that casually claimed he'd died in 1959.

Hugh Percy Wilkins' date of death was January 23, 1960.
 

Shady

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#19
We used to have Tide over here years ago, last time i saw it was in Canada, it was a nice suprise.

I have never heard about the bridge on the moon, that sounds intriguing
 

INT21

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#20
Shady,

George H Leonard mentions it in his book 'Someone else is on our moon'.
 

EnolaGaia

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#21

Shady

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#22
Thank you INT21 and EnolaGaia, quite a story, and are they really called craterlets, sounds like they are little tarts, made me giggle
 

Ghost of Fort

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#23
I can't find any source that lists Harold Tom Wilkins' date of death as 1966.

The most specific citations consistently give his date of death as January 29, 1960. The only variant I found was a single source that casually claimed he'd died in 1959.

Hugh Percy Wilkins' date of death was January 23, 1960.
This may be true, but publishers continued to list the old boys address at least until 1967 due to carelessness, I suppose. I seem to have read a mention of him around 1962 somewhere, but could well have this mixed-up with somebody else.

The late Patrick Moore is reported to have seen Hugh Percy Wilkins's bridge when they worked together in the 1950s on the Moon; he later became an infamous skeptic, of course, on UFOs in particular.
 

Ghost of Fort

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#24
Leonard(1921-1994) caught so much grief over Somebody Else... he cancelled a planned n-f book on UFOs, and from what his letter said, he was ridiculed rest of his life over the above.

He did a UFO novel, ALIEN/ALIEN QUEST(In the U.K., and not to be confused with the infamous "Alien" film franchise, plus some routine sf.
 

EnolaGaia

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#25
Here's a transcription of my Conversation with Ghost of Fort. I'm copying it to this thread to aid others (e.g., in understanding post #24) and to transfer follow-on questions and comments into public view.

Ghost of Fort Wrote:

He was John J. O'Neill, right? In any event, Mr.Leonard was not the only author to make similar speculations in-re to the Moon; I believe he references a pair of Russian (then Soviet, I suppose I should say) who originated the notions he explored, as well as U.S. writer Don(ald) G. Wilson. Wilson did Our Mysterious Spaceship Moon and Secrets of Our Spaceship Moon (the U.K. cover of the latter is quite neat, shows Apollo Command Module, and a large UFO orbiting together).These are two separate title, although ISFDb indicates the latter as the U.K. title - not. Have both of them. Wilson is something of a mystery; was b.1932, and evidently, these are his only two actual books. He had planned one of the mysteries of Mars, and some sample chapters appeared in late 1970s UFO magazines here, but the Mars book itself never appeared.

I Replied:

Ghost of Fort said:
He was John J. O'Neill, right? ...
Yes / right ...

Ghost of Fort said:
U.S. writer Don(ald) G. Wilson. Wilson did Our Mysterious Spaceship Moon and Secrets of Our Spaceship Moon ...
As far as I can tell from cursory online searching, Wilson's books consistently displayed his name as simply "Don Wilson."

Deeper checks in library / bibliographic databases indicate his name was Donald K. Wilson rather than Donald G. Wilson.


Ghost of Fort Wrote:

It seems various sources give both middle initials for Wilson; I think our U.S. version of CONTEMPORARY AUTHORS gave "G", for a long time, anyway. This isn't so unusual for writers to go by differing versions of their name - must admit to having done so myself at times. He seems to have been born in St. Ignace, Michigan, btw. I wrote his old literary agency years ago (literally), and they had not had any contact with the man then in a long while. He is possibly deceased, although with that common a name, contact with his family might be required to be certain.
 

EnolaGaia

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#26

EnolaGaia

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#27
Transcribed from a PM for public viewing ...

(GHOST OF FORT: Please post general inquiries here on the open forum - not in a PM that only I might see.)


John Macklin wrote a dozen or more of what I like to call "Fortean readers" (for obvious reasons, I would think) similar to those the late Frank Edwards did like Stranger than Science. I think he mentions having been born 1918, possibly in Ireland, in one such, and I haven't found a dod for him as-yet. Some of his titles are Prelude to Nightmare, Challenge to Reality, Strange Encounters, The Enigma of the Unknown, and many more. Some material of his has seen reprint in recent years, albeit in collections with similar authors.( Most were issued by Ace Books in the U..S. in his heyday). If anyone can find a dod, or even a corrected dob, I shall be most grateful.
 

Ghost of Fort

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#28
I can't find any source that lists Harold Tom Wilkins' date of death as 1966.

The most specific citations consistently give his date of death as January 29, 1960. The only variant I found was a single source that casually claimed he'd died in 1959.

Hugh Percy Wilkins' date of death was January 23, 1960.
Transcribed from a PM for public viewing ...

(GHOST OF FORT: Please post general inquiries here on the open forum - not in a PM that only I might see.)

John Macklin wrote a dozen or more of what I like to call "Fortean readers" (for obvious reasons, I would think) similar to those the late Frank Edwards did like Stranger than Science. I think he mentions having been born 1918, possibly in Ireland, in one such, and I haven't found a dod for him as-yet. Some of his titles are Prelude to Nightmare, Challenge to Reality, Strange Encounters, The Enigma of the Unknown, and many more. Some material of his has seen reprint in recent years, albeit in collections with similar authors.( Most were issued by Ace Books in the U..S. in his heyday). If anyone can find a dod, or even a corrected dob, I shall be most grateful.
 
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