H. P. Lovecraft

PeteByrdie

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Close, but that's more about ability and action and real life. My thoughts are more about taste in pop culture/media being out of sync.
I don't think we've got a thread like that. Take the bull by the horns Gerda and make one! :)
 

FrKadash

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Just found this Lovecraftian novel via the Lovecraft eZine Facerbook page. Nightmare's Disciple: A Lovecraftian Crime Novel.

Here's the description from the amazon.co.uk listing:

Schenectady, New York. Winter.

The mutilated bodies of dead women are showing up everywhere and Detective Christopher Stewart hasn’t got a clue, until he discovers the Cthulhu Mythos of H.P. Lovecraft. He also discovers that H.P. Lovecraft was a prophet… and that the stars are right for murder.

NIGHTMARE'S DISCIPLE is a richly-detailed, modern day Cthulhu Mythos novel of the terror a serial killer leaves in his wake and the hunt to foil his special plan for the world.





https://www.amazon.co.uk/Nightmares...e-Novel-ebook/dp/B01LBLVS16/?tag=geolinker-21
 

graylien

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Today I bought a collection of short stories by Thomas Ligotti who seems to share Lovecraft's cosmic pessimism.

There isn't much of his stuff online, but this reading of Nethescurial is worth a listen. The structure is a tad baroque but it's worth sticking with it to the chilling climax.

As well as the obvious Lovecraft influence, the conclusion of the story reminded me of Philip K Dick's gnostic horror tale Faith of our Fathers.

 

StuKE

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I read some Ligotti a few years ago, definitely a Lovecraft feel to some of the short stories.
 

FrKadash

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THE COMPLICATED FRIENDSHIP OF H. P. LOVECRAFT AND ROBERT BARLOW, ONE OF HIS BIGGEST FANS
By Paul La Farge
March 9, 2017

On June 18, 1931, a young man named Robert Barlow mailed a letter to the horror writer H. P. Lovecraft. Lovecraft’s stories about monstrous beings from beyond the stars were appearing regularly in the pulp magazine Weird Tales, and Barlow was a fan. He wanted to know when Lovecraft had started writing, what he was working on now, and whether the Necronomicon—a tome of forbidden knowledge that appears in several Lovecraft tales—was a real book.
http://www.newyorker.com/books/page...aft-and-robert-barlow-one-of-his-biggest-fans
 

FrKadash

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HP Lovecraft Comes to the World of Anime!
SERGIO PÉREZ GAVILÁN
Mar 27 2017, 10:01pm

'Force of Will' features a girl who has the power to give life to the things she writes.
A monster stalks and destroys everything that crosses its path in a feature film inspired by The Call of Cthulhu, the immortal story by sci-fi scion HP Lovecraft. The film, by Yamatoworks, is titled Force of Will, and it revolves around a girlwho has the power to give life to the very words she writes. The animated tale is a riveting and emotional tour de force.
https://creators.vice.com/en_us/article/hp-lovecraft-force-of-will-anime

 

FrKadash

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Just saw this interesting looking new book,
Dawnward Spire, Lonely Hill: The Letters of H. P. Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith

The publication of the fifteen-year correspondence of two of the titans of weird fiction, H. P. Lovecraft (1890–1937) and Clark Ashton Smith (1893–1961), is a landmark event. This mammoth volume, containing 330 letters written between 1922 and 1937, allows an unprecedented glimpse into the lives, minds, and creative instincts of two brilliant writers who lived a continent apart and never met, but who shared a fascination with the weird and the cosmic and had the highest regard for each other’s work.
https://www.hippocampuspress.com/h....ers-of-h.-p.-lovecraft-and-clark-ashton-smith
 

gerhard1

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Been a long time since I read Lovecraft. I remember in the preface to one of his books that he said that the idea underlay his work was that a race of immensely powerful beings, the Old Ones, had been forced out of this universe a long time in the past, but they were constantly looking for a way back in. Lovecraft himself was promiscuous with his sources drawing on everything from the story of the Salem witch hunts in the Eastern US to Arabic literature.

I don't know if anybody thinks Lovecraft mytholgy was real (although it has influenced writers from Ramsey to Stephen King). I do know that 'Color Out of Space' scared me terribly when I first read it and that it inspired 'The Blob.'
:eek:
A very old question I am responding to, but the Lovecraft mythos has influenced the story I am working on now. It draws heavily from the Lovecraft story, The Call of Cthulhu.

Another story I am working on intermittently draws much of its' influence from current events. That story is now mainly simmering on the back burner but is very nearly done.
 

FrKadash

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An old article but an interesting one, I'm very interested in Roerich's work.

Lovecraft’s Inspiration for At the Mountains of Madness: The Paintings of Nicholas Roerich
Posted on May 20, 2011 by Paul

One of Lovecraft’s most famous works of literature, and certainly his longest, is the magnificent novelette At the Mountains of Madness. This work is one of the best examples of a particular facet of the Cthulhu Mythos: the survival of intelligent and powerful creatures of a time before the coming of Man. In this theme we see the invalidation of our conceptions permanence and safety. If such societies could have existed, and fallen, then so can we humans. Such ancient cultures, if revived, could pose an existential threat to humanity as a whole, or at least our dominance over this planet. In At the Mountains of Madness, this theme is explored through the devise of an expedition to the south pole. There the narrator, William Dyer, along with his research team of fellow scientists and explorers, uncover an ancient city – along with the improbable survival of a few members of the ancient race which built it. Frequent readers of this blog may remember myhorrified lament at the failure of James Cameron’s attempts to film this particular work; listeners to the podcast may recall our gushing over this story in our readers guide to the Cthulhu Mythos.
http://diceofdoom.com/blog/2011/05/...of-madness-the-paintings-of-nicholas-roerich/
 

PeteByrdie

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I've always thought the same about that sketch. Lovecraft was perhaps not so much a sketcher. I recently picked up a little figurine based on that sketch and descriptions of the Cthulhu statues from Lovecraft's stories. It's much cooler!
 

Mythopoeika

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I've always thought the same about that sketch. Lovecraft was perhaps not so much a sketcher. I recently picked up a little figurine based on that sketch and descriptions of the Cthulhu statues from Lovecraft's stories. It's much cooler!
Ooh! A piccy would be luvverly!
 
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This should really work well!

Conservative Christian Touts Lovecraft as a Tool to Bring Readers Back to Christ
8/19/2017

It seems like most of the fringe history purveyors have been laying low this month, the traditional time for a summer vacation. Or maybe the current flap over white supremacy has left purveyors of bad ideas about the past trying to stay below radar since so many of their ideas tend to have white supremacist undertones. Whatever the reason, it seems like there have been fewer high-profile fringe history claims this week than in most. So today I bring you an interesting meditation on H. P. Lovecraft instead. The piece in question comes from conservative Christian C. R. Wiley, who argues that Lovecraft’s weird fiction can actually help to bring Christians closer to God by giving them a “taste” of the “weirdness” of God. It’s an unusual argument, and perhaps one that Lovecraft would find amusing, if not offensive.

Wiley’s argument centers on the fact that many modern Christians don’t actually engage with the Bible in all its many facets but instead have created a sort of fantasy version of Christianity based on a simpler understanding of God as all-loving, a sort of cosmic grandfather. Wiley prefers to deal with God as depicted in the Old Testament, a being so far beyond the human that comprehension is impossible. It is this vision of God that Wiley says Lovecraft can help us understand by describing efforts to grapple with a transcendent reality that we can glimpse only dimly and incompletely. ...

http://www.jasoncolavito.com/blog/c...aft-as-a-tool-to-bring-readers-back-to-christ
 
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