History Rewritten

rynner2

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Is the Mosquito the greatest warplane of all?
The Spitfire is more famous but, discovers Jasper Copping, the de Havilland Mosquito can claim to be the plane that won the war

...

The title of tonight’s show makes a bold claim on behalf of the Mosquito, but Williams has marshalled strong support for the aircraft.
Eric “Winkle” Brown, a wartime test pilot, tells him: “I’m often asked, what type of aircraft saved Britain. My answer is that the Mosquito was particularly important because it wasn’t just a fighter or a bomber. It was a night fighter, a reconnaissance aircraft. A ground-attack aircraft. It was a multi-purpose aircraft.”

...

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/history/worl ... f-all.html

http://www.channel4.com/programmes/the- ... ritain/4od

I saw the documentary last night, and although I thought I was fairly familiar with the mozzie, the fact that it could be fitted with a sub-busting gun was new to me, as was the fact that it could land on aircraft carriers! 8)
Now, a documentary about 'Winkle' Brown himself, with footage of Mozzies at sea:

Britain's Greatest Pilot: The Extraordinary Story of Captain Winkle Brown

Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown, 95, recounts his flying experiences and adventures up to and during the Second World War in this documentary illustrated with archive footage and Captain Brown's own photos.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... nkle-brown

First shown: 3 June 2014
Duration 60 min.
 

rynner2

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rynner2 said:
Stilton celebrates as it is confirmed as home of the famous cheese
Home staff

Celebrations were in full swing yesterday after the village of Stilton was named as the official birthplace of the blue-veined cheese [pictured at a May Day celebration].

...

Nigel White, of the SCMA, said: “There are still many missing links within Stilton’s history and we appreciate all the work the villagers have put into this research.”

Stilton cheese is protected by EU legislation and Blue Stilton is made only in six licensed dairies across Nottinghamshire, Leicestershire, and Derbyshire. Now Mr Landy hopes to challenge the EU licensing laws.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_a ... 843635.ece
Stilton campaigners hope 'cheesy shoe' will help PDO battle

A shoe with a "Stilton wedge" heel is the latest tactic by the Cambridgeshire village of Stilton to get its blue cheese officially recognised.
Richard Landy is leading Stilton's campaign against an EU law stating it can only be produced in Leicestershire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire.

He asked resident Lorna Grey, a design student, to make the "prototype" shoe.
"Stilton makers produced Stilton perfume once, but we thought a Stilton shoe was a bit quirkier," he said.

In 1996, the Stilton Cheesemakers' Association achieved Protected Designation of Origin (PDO) status for blue Stilton from the European Commission.
That meant it could only be produced in the counties of Leicestershire, Derbyshire and Nottinghamshire where it is thought the cheese originated.

However, Mr Landy said 18th Century documents proved Stilton cheese originated in its namesake Cambridgeshire village.
An application to have "Stilton's Village Blue" recognised by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) was rejected in October.

Campaigners have since met with Defra and George Eustice, minister for farming, food and the marine environment, and plan to reapply.
In the meantime, Mr Landy hopes the cheesy shoe will help promote the village's product.

Miss Grey, 19, a footwear design student at De Montfort University, said: "I was a bit shocked when I was given the brief but I'm really happy with the result.
"It's not actually made of cheese. I used a variety of materials to make the shoe and painted the wedge to make it look like real cheese
"It's a prototype and a bit funny to walk in but I'm sure I'd get the hang of it eventually."

Mr Landy said: "The cheesemakers' association use all sorts of things like perfume and a stilton dress to promote their product.
"We've got a cheesy shoe.
"It could be seen as a slightly dodgy choice because although the idea of cheese and feet goes together, it's not usually in a good way.
"But Lorna's got a foot in both camps. She's studying in Leicestershire but she's from Stilton, so we think it's a good choice." 8)

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-ca ... e-28351825
 

Frideswide

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rynner2 said:
rynner2 said:

"Stilton makers produced Stilton perfume once, but we thought a Stilton shoe was a bit quirkier," he said.


I disagree. I believe that a stilton shoe is positively every-day-wear compared to stilton scent. And I write as a fan!
 
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Did the Vikings Get a Bum Rap?
A Yale historian wants us to rethink the terrible tales about the Norse.

The Vikings gave no quarter when they stormed the city of Nantes, in what is now western France, in June 843—not even to the monks barricaded in the city's cathedral. "The heathens mowed down the entire multitude of priest, clerics, and laity," according to one witness account. Among the slain, allegedly killed while celebrating the Mass, was a bishop who later was granted sainthood.

To modern readers the attack seems monstrous, even by the standards of medieval warfare. But the witness account contains more than a touch of hyperbole, writes Anders Winroth, a Yale history professor and author of the book The Age of the Vikings, a sweeping new survey. What's more, he says, such exaggeration was often a feature of European writings about the Vikings.

When the account of the Nantes attack is scrutinized, "a more reasonable image emerges," he writes. After stating that the Vikings had killed the "entire multitude," for instance, the witness contradicts himself by noting that some of the clerics were taken into captivity. And there were enough people left—among the "many who survived the massacre"—to pay ransom to get prisoners back.

In short, aside from ignoring the taboo against treating monks and priests specially, the Vikings acted not much differently from other European warriors of the period, Winroth argues.

In 782, for instance, Charlemagne, now heralded as the original unifier of Europe, beheaded 4,500 Saxon captives on a single day. "The Vikings never got close to that level of efficiency," Winroth says, drily.

Just how bad were the Vikings?

Winroth is among the scholars who believe the Vikings were no more bloodthirsty than other warriors of the period. But they suffered from bad public relations—in part because they attacked a society more literate than their own, and therefore most accounts of them come from their victims. Moreover, because the Vikings were pagan, they played into a Christian story line that cast them as a devilish, malign, outside force.

"There is this general idea of the Vikings as being exciting and other, as something that we can't understand from our point of view—which is simply continuing the story line of the victims in their own time," Winroth says. "One starts to think of them in storybook terms, which is deeply unfair." ...

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news ... gn=Content
 

rynner2

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King Harold 'may have survived Battle of Hastings' claim

An underground scan is being carried out at Waltham Abbey in Essex in a hunt for evidence that King Harold survived the Battle of Hastings.
Novelist and amateur historian Peter Burke wants to test his theory that the king recovered and lived for 40 years after the battle on 14 October 1066.
He is challenging historical records which state that King Harold was killed by William the Conqueror's soldiers.
Battle Historical Society said the theory was unlikely to be true.

Mr Burke is sponsoring a search for the remains of King Harold, widely believed to be buried in the grounds of Waltham Abbey.
He said the alternative version of Harold's death comes from a 12th Century document, Vita Harold, in the British Library which he found while researching his trilogy The Promise.

"It was taken from a young novice priest who took the last rites of an old pilgrim called Christian who declared on his death bed that he was Harold Godwinson, the last Saxon king," said Mr Burke.
"He was hidden in Winchester and brought back to health by a Moorish nurse. He tried to raise an army in Germany but they weren't interested and he spent his life travelling as a pilgrim."

The scan, taking place on the 948th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings, is being carried out by the geological survey company which helped to locate the remains of King Richard III in 2012 beneath a car park in Leicester.

Neil Clephane-Cameron, from Battle and District Historical Society, said the story that King Harold survived the battle did not sit comfortably with him.
"The contemporary accounts, both Norman and Saxon, all give the fact that Harold was killed at the battle," he said.

"Even if there is a body at Waltham it doesn't mean that he necessarily survived but it might confirm whether the accounts are correct because there should be be fairly distinctive giveaways."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-sussex-29612656
 

rynner2

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rynner2 said:
Now, a documentary about 'Winkle' Brown himself, with footage of Mozzies at sea:

Britain's Greatest Pilot: The Extraordinary Story of Captain Winkle Brown

Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown, 95, recounts his flying experiences and adventures up to and during the Second World War in this documentary illustrated with archive footage and Captain Brown's own photos.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... nkle-brown

First shown: 3 June 2014
Duration 60 min.
For those who missed that, there's an article about him:

Eric 'Winkle' Brown: The man who seemed not to notice danger
By Luke Jones, BBC News Magazine

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-30039300
 

LordRsmacker

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rynner2 said:
rynner2 said:
Now, a documentary about 'Winkle' Brown himself, with footage of Mozzies at sea:

Britain's Greatest Pilot: The Extraordinary Story of Captain Winkle Brown

Captain Eric 'Winkle' Brown, 95, recounts his flying experiences and adventures up to and during the Second World War in this documentary illustrated with archive footage and Captain Brown's own photos.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0 ... nkle-brown

First shown: 3 June 2014
Duration 60 min.
For those who missed that, there's an article about him:

Eric 'Winkle' Brown: The man who seemed not to notice danger
By Luke Jones, BBC News Magazine

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-30039300
He was the guest on Desert Island Discs on Radio 4 this past week.
 
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When Herbert G. Claudius's family would ask him if he'd ever sunk an enemy submarine during his decades in the U.S. Navy, Claudius would say that he thought he did once. He'd seen oil and debris after a fierce battle he'd led against a German U-boat in the Gulf of Mexico in 1942.

But Claudius could never be sure that he'd sunk the sub.

The U.S. Navy certainly didn't seem to think so. After the battle, just 25 miles (40 kilometers) from the U.S. mainland, the Navy removed Claudius from command and sent him to anti-sub-warfare school.

But on Tuesday, Claudius was posthumously vindicated at the Pentagon, as the U.S. Secretary of the Navy announced that his ship had indeed fired the depth charges that sank German U-boat U-166.


"Seventy years later, we now know that [Claudius's] report after the action was absolutely correct," Navy Secretary Ray Mabus said in a small ceremony attended by members of Claudius's family. ...

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/...u-boat-u-166-gulf-mexico-archaeology-history/

"[Claudius's ship] did sink that U-boat, and it's never too late to set the record straight," Mabus said, as he presented the late captain with a posthumous Legion of Merit with a Combat "V" device, which recognizes heroism in battle.
 

Cavynaut

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Maybe the Apocrypha are?

I start my course on NT texts in TCD this pm.
From what little I know about the Apocrypha, I would hazard a guess that like most pre - Enlightenment history they are written with an agenda in mind. Off the top of my head the best example I can think of is Bede's History of the Anglo-Saxon people. It's full of dates,but very little "real" history. Why? 'Cos his main aim was to record the dates so that the church could make sure it got its feast dates right.

But don't take my word for it, my interest is strictly post French Revolution.

Sounds like an interesting course..part of a BA?
 
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From what little I know about the Apocrypha, I would hazard a guess that like most pre - Enlightenment history they are written with an agenda in mind. Off the top of my head the best example I can think of is Bede's History of the Anglo-Saxon people. It's full of dates,but very little "real" history. Why? 'Cos his main aim was to record the dates so that the church could make sure it got its feast dates right.

But don't take my word for it, my interest is strictly post French Revolution.

Sounds like an interesting course..part of a BA?
Disaster!

I was given the wrong room number for the lecture. By the time I got the right location it would have been 25 minutes into the lecture. They admitted the mistake. An Act of God.

Its an independent module. In TCD you may access a wide range of courses provided you accept that the totality may not add up to any qualification. In the last term I did Europe: Politics & Culture 1700 - 1815. Term before: A Survey of US history.
 

Cavynaut

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Its an independent module. In TCD you may access a wide range of courses provided you accept that the totality may not add up to any qualification. In the last term I did Europe: Politics & Culture 1700 - 1815. Term before: A Survey of US history.
That sounds like a nice idea. I'd love to go back to Hull and do something similar. A short course on the English Civil War would be my first choice. Alas, it doesn't seem to work like that....I could go and do an MA, but there is the small matter of 4 or 5 grand to find first.

Good luck...and double check the room number in future!
 

rynner2

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Lends a whole new meaning to "My my, Miss American Pie",
It seems that the truth about this song will shortly be revealed:

What do American Pie's lyrics mean?
By James Morgan BBC News, Washington DC

As the original manuscript for Don Mclean's 1971 classic goes up for auction, fans may finally discover what the "Song of the Century" is really about. So what are the popular theories?
When people ask Don McLean what does American Pie really mean, he likes to reply: "It means I never have to work again. ";)

His eight-minute-long "rock and roll American dream" became an anthem for an entire generation - who memorised every line.
Their children in turn grew up singing it - fascinated by the mysterious lyrics with their cryptic references to 50s innocence, the turbulent 60s, and 70s disillusion.
Who broke the church bells? Who was the jester who sang for the king and queen? And what really was revealed "the day the music died"?
There are fan websites entirely dedicated to solving these mysteries, where literary detectives pore over the clues, line by line.
The song's 69-year-old architect has always remained tight-lipped.

But now at long, long last, his inspirations behind "The Song of the Century" are to be revealed as McLean puts his original manuscript up for auction on Tuesday.
These 16 pages of handwritten notes, which have lain hidden away in a box in his home for 43 years, are expected to fetch $1.5m (£1m) at Christie's in New York.
But for McLean aficionados there is a greater prize.
The drafts, unedited, reveal the creative process behind American Pie "from beginning to end", according to Tom Lecky of Christie's.
"You see great moments of inspiration, you see him attempting things that then didn't work out. The direction that he was going in that he then didn't want to follow.
"Those words that we all know so well weren't fixed in the beginning."

As the singer himself said recently: "The writing and the lyrics will divulge everything there is to divulge."
For McLean scholars with pet theories, there could be bad news on the doorstep. This could be the day that they die. :(

But before we sing bye bye, and in honour of the American Pie fans everywhere, the BBC News Magazine takes a nostalgic trip back through the song's six enigmatic verses, and the popular theories that have grown up around them.

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/magazine-32196117
 

rynner2

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It looks like Don Mclean will never have to work again - again!

American Pie lyrics sell for $1.2m
7th April 2015
The original manuscript of Don McLean's American Pie has sold for $1.2m (£806,000) at a New York auction.
The 16-page draft had been expected to fetch as much as $1.5m (£1m) at the Christie's sale.
McLean had hinted in February the original manuscript would reveal the song's lyrical meaning - which had always been kept a mystery.
"The writing and the lyrics will divulge everything there is to divulge," he said.
The 69-year-old previously acknowledged the beginning of the song is about the death of Buddy Holly, Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper - Jiles P Richardson - in a plane crash, but has remained elusive about the rest of the track.

The mystery has made American Pie one of the most debated songs in music history.
McLean said writing the song was "a mystical trip into his past".
The singer said he decided to sell the manuscript, which includes multiple drafts with handwritten notes and deletions, on a whim.
The eight-minute song was number one in the US for four weeks and reached number two in the UK singles chart in 1972.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-32208584
 

GNC

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American Pie means "Boo hoo, modern music is rubbish and it was so much better in the old days."
 

rynner2

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I know everything about that song, can't even remember where I learned it all. It's no mystery to me.
But did whoever told you 'everything' actually get it right? The original lyrics, notes, etc, should clear up the wrong guesses. I expect a lot of websites might have to be edited! ;)
 

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I love American Pie and still regard Madonna's cover version as the most pointless of all cover versions ... to be honest though, I only got into it when I was at college because it was the longest playing song on the jukebox for 50p ...
 

escargot

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First heard it in McClean's BBC 'In Concert' performance in 1972. This was before the American Pie album came out.

Recorded it on my little cassette recorder, learned all the songs, never even heard the actual American Pie album until years later!
 

OneWingedBird

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Soon everyone will know more about Eddie than he does:

Britain's most famous ski jumper, "Eddie the Eagle" Edwards, has been warned a movie being made about his life is 90% "made up".

The retired sportsman, who lives in Stroud, Gloucestershire, became a hero at the Calgary Winter Olympics in 1988 despite finishing a distant last.

A film, starring Welsh actor Taron Egerton as Eddie, is currently being filmed and due for release next year.
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-gloucestershire-33025892
 
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Nazi sympathiser and former King, the Duke of Windsor, 'wanted England bombed', archives reveal
King Edward VIII, who later became the Duke of Windsor and is widely regarded as a Nazi sympathiser, once argued that bombing England could bring peace by ending WWII, it has emerged.

Correspondence kept in the Royal Archives between the British royal family and their German relatives in the run up to WWII remains confidential.

However, information pieced together from open archives across 30 countries, including Germany, Spain and Russia, has revealed the close relationship some members of the European aristocracy had with the Nazis.

Dr Karina Urbach, senior research fellow at the Institute of Historical Research at the School of Advance Study at the University of London, has uncovered how the Duke of Windsor told Don Javier Bermejillo, his old friend and Spanish diplomat, that the British royal blamed “the Jews, the Reds and the Foreign Office for the war”.

Writing for The Conversation, Dr Urbach explained how Windsor told Bermejillo on 25 June 1940 that “if one bombed England effectively this could bring peace.

“Bermejillo concluded that the Duke of Windsor seemed very much to hope that this would occur: 'He wants peace at any price.',” wrote Dr Urbach.

She added: “This report went to Franco and was then passed on to the Germans. The bombing of Britain started on 10 July.” ...

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/n...-england-bombed-archives-reveal-31287014.html

 

GNC

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That's odd, Madonna said he was a really nice guy...
 
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