Horror Films

GNC

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I was once asked to help a local rock band make a Cromer based horror rock video but that never happened, my involvement was to be to make fake human sized crab claws that the musicians would wear playing on the pier while super imposed 'giant' crabs would attack the town sort of like TARANTULA, she was going to be the scream queen but they couldn't raise the cash in the end.
Surely they would attack sort of like in Attack of the Crab Monsters? Or in a Guy N. Smith paperback?
 

Swifty

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Surely they would attack sort of like in Attack of the Crab Monsters? Or in a Guy N. Smith paperback?
I'd also imagined getting some aerial shot photographs of Cromer printed off then filming those from above with some baby crabs crawling across them with me blowing some cigarette smoke across the scene then playing that back in slower motion .. sounds shit but it's surprisingly effective if you do it right.
 

GNC

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I'd also imagined getting some aerial shot photographs of Cromer printed off then filming those from above with some baby crabs crawling across them with me blowing some cigarette smoke across the scene then playing that back in slower motion .. sounds shit but it's surprisingly effective if you do it right.
Still better effects than Attack of the Crab Monsters has...
 

Naughty_Felid

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Surely they would attack sort of like in Attack of the Crab Monsters? Or in a Guy N. Smith paperback?
With Guy N Smith it's basically boy meets girl, boy sleeps with girl on Cromer beach, boy and girl get dismembered and eaten by giant crabs. The Bristish army turn up and fight the giant crabs with tommy guns and grenades and lose.

James Herbert had rats
Shaun Hutson had slugs
and Guy N Smith had erm crabs...
 

FrKadash

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Has anyone seen Possum yet? Was planning on watching it tonight. It caught my attention due to this article from Dangerous Minds.

''Possum, by the way, tells “the story of a disgraced children’s puppeteer who returns to his childhood home and is forced to confront his wicked stepfather and the secrets that have tortured him his entire life.” The film is the directorial debut of Matthew Holness, who American audiences will know as the star and co-creator/writer of the classic British TV cult comedy Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace. (Along with Holness’ hilarious portrayal of self-absorbed/delusional sci-fi and horror writer Marenghi—“author, dream weaver, visionary, plus actor”—this show also marked the breakout roles for Richard Ayoade, Matt Berry and Alice Lowe.) The film is an adaption of Holness’ short story of the same title.''

The Radiophonic Workshop creates creepy score for ‘Possum’ with help from the late Delia Derbyshire
12.18.2018
04:51 pm

The original score for Possum was created by the recently revived Radiophonic Workshop, the pioneering BBC electronic sound laboratory responsible for the Doctor Who theme and the sound effects for a host of radio and television programs over the past sixty years. You would think that at least once during their long association that the Radiophonic Workshop would have scored at least one feature film for theatrical release, or collaborated on a major score for something together, but this has not been the case. Until now. And what a fascinating and major piece it is, reminding the listener of Ennio Morricone’s anxiety-ridden giallo scores and the darkest soundscapes of Coil.
https://dangerousminds.net/comments...ail&utm_term=0_ecada8d328-83adfdb9ff-65914949
 

Swifty

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Has anyone seen Possum yet? Was planning on watching it tonight. It caught my attention due to this article from Dangerous Minds.

''Possum, by the way, tells “the story of a disgraced children’s puppeteer who returns to his childhood home and is forced to confront his wicked stepfather and the secrets that have tortured him his entire life.” The film is the directorial debut of Matthew Holness, who American audiences will know as the star and co-creator/writer of the classic British TV cult comedy Garth Marenghi’s Darkplace. (Along with Holness’ hilarious portrayal of self-absorbed/delusional sci-fi and horror writer Marenghi—“author, dream weaver, visionary, plus actor”—this show also marked the breakout roles for Richard Ayoade, Matt Berry and Alice Lowe.) The film is an adaption of Holness’ short story of the same title.''



https://dangerousminds.net/comments...ail&utm_term=0_ecada8d328-83adfdb9ff-65914949
I've not heard of it but I like the sound of it, I'll be keeping a look out for it cheers.
 
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Lizzie: Based on Lizzie Borden and the murder of her parents in 1892. This new take on the events stars Chloe evigny as Lizzie and Kristin Stewart as her maid Bridget. The Borden family home is a dark one, literally because the father, Andrew (Jamey Sheridan), regards gaslight as an extravagance, also because of his attitude towards Lizzie, her attending the theatre alone and public epileptic fits reflects badly on the family and will only ensure her continuing spinistership in his opinion. Her sister Emma (Kim Dickens) is also a spinster, trapped in the house. Her stepmother Abby (Fiona Shaw) is equally cold and looks forward to Lizzie being placed in an institution. Abby is aware that Andrew is preying on but won't publicly acknowledge it. Lizzie develops a close relationship with Bridget, the discovery of this by her father and the likelihood of her predatory and feckless uncle (Denis O'Hare) having control over Kim and Lizzie's inheritance brings things to a head.

The darkness of the house is contrasted with the brightness of the shed in which Lizzie keeps her pigeons and where her trysts with Bridget take place. The Gothic aspects of the film are enhanced by the coldness and cruelty of the father. When Lizzie commits an act of rebellion, he strikes at what is dear to her. But it is the casual callousness of what follows afterwards which shows him as a fully rounded villain rather than a pantomime one. The secondary villain, Uncle John, also has his turpitude fleshed out and his motivations are clear.

How the murders might have been carried out (some gruesome hatchet work) by Lizzie with the connivance of Bridget is explored in the film as is the subsequent trial and Lizzie's acquittal. While the all male jury were unwilling to believe that someone of Lizzie's background could have carried out such an act, there was also forensic evidence (possibly faked) which created a doubt as to her guilt. Director Craig William MacNeill and writer Bryce Kass may not have solved the mystery but this is an interesting dramatisation of the affair. 8/10.
 
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FrKadash

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I've not heard of it but I like the sound of it, I'll be keeping a look out for it cheers.
It was excellent! One of the best films I've seen in ages. I had a good feeling about it as soon as I started reading about the film. The soundscape/music from the new Radiophonic Workshop is brilliant, creepy and fitting, and the Norfolk filming locations are haunting and bleak. Great acting from Sean Harris. Don't want to spoil it so won't say too much about the story itself, but watch it as soon as you can!
 

Swifty

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A Christmas present from Jordan Peele, the trailer for his new horror, Us:

Definitely looking forward to this one.
Looks good .. it reminds me a bit of that old Hammer House Of Horrors TV episode when everyone's being replaced by evil doubles. I think it was called twins of evil or the two faces of evil ...
 

Jim

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A bit corny but actually not a bad 50's B horror movie, "I was a Teenage Frankenstein". A British Doctor Frankenstein descendant of the earlier Dr. Frankenstein visit America to lecture on the latest medical developments (image that). A car wreck occurs near his lab. One is thrown from the car and goes missing (into the doctors personal morgue). He is to be the next scientific marvel, but things go wrong.
 

Jim

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Do you self a favor don’t waste your time with “Tusk”. Initially lead me to believe it be an interesting pursuit of cryptozoology. Not so, iIt progress’s into a movie about a Canadian pervert.
I’ve enjoy some low budget Horror, particularly if it’s got a bit of tongue and cheek “ like the old Ed Wood horror movie”, none of that here. 1 out of 10.
 

Swifty

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Do you self a favor don’t waste your time with “Tusk”. Initially lead me to believe it be an interesting pursuit of cryptozoology. Not so, iIt progress’s into a movie about a Canadian pervert.
I’ve enjoy some low budget Horror, particularly if it’s got a bit of tongue and cheek “ like the old Ed Wood horror movie”, none of that here. 1 out of 10.
Sadly I have to agree on Tusk .. I want to keep loving Kevin Smith films but no, Tusk was crap.
 

GNC

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Looks good .. it reminds me a bit of that old Hammer House Of Horrors TV episode when everyone's being replaced by evil doubles. I think it was called twins of evil or the two faces of evil ...
Yes, that's a really good comparison! I wonder of Mr Peele has seen The Two Faces of Evil? It's a terrific hour of TV.
 
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A heist gone wrong which just about qualifies as horror.

Bullet Head: A robbery gone wrong, three Crooks in a car with a dead getaway driver. Seems so familiar, seems even a cliche but this thriller written and directed by Paul Solel with the aid of cinematographer Zoran Popovic and editor Josh Ethier puts a new stamp on this tired old trope introducing elements of visceral horror.

The three survivors, Adrien Brody, John Malkovich and Rory Culkin take shelter in an abandoned storage facility, waiting for a pick up driver, They quarrel, reminisce, we get back stories. Culkin is a problem as he desperately needs a fix. But the warehouse is also being used by dog-fighters, we see the action of the night before, bets placed, dogs fight to the death. Injured dogs are supposed to be euthanised but at least one pit-bull terrier is loose and having already killed it’s handler now hunts the trio.

The characters are fleshed out by the back stories, even the mobster who runs the dog fights, Antonio Banderas appears as a rounded though psychopathic individual who allowed the pitbull to pay with his niece. The actual dog fights are not shown (just the aftermath) but a special camera technique allows us to see the pov of the pitbull. A film which alternatively appals and terrifies. A chase/hunt through vast open spaces and tunnels. 8/10. On Netflix.
 

GNC

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Seeing as how it's winter, Mark Kermode did a podcast on The Shining:
Kermode podcast

He admires it, but doesn't think it's scary, which is a problem for him. Jolly good discussion, though oddly they say the shining has no effect on the plot. Well, no, apart from the hotel wanting to possess Danny for his shine, and the shining enabling Halloran to know he's in peril and driving all that way to save him, which gives Danny and Wendy an escape route. So the shining is actually pretty important to The Shining.
 

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Seeing as how it's winter, Mark Kermode did a podcast on The Shining:
Kermode podcast

He admires it, but doesn't think it's scary, which is a problem for him. Jolly good discussion, though oddly they say the shining has no effect on the plot. Well, no, apart from the hotel wanting to possess Danny for his shine, and the shining enabling Halloran to know he's in peril and driving all that way to save him, which gives Danny and Wendy an escape route. So the shining is actually pretty important to The Shining.
Friedkin also didn't think it was scary. (Just listening to that podcast you posted - instead of studying).
'
 

GNC

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Friedkin also didn't think it was scary. (Just listening to that podcast you posted - instead of studying).
'
Hey, it's a good podcast. And makes me wonder if Mr Friedkin has too much influence over Mr Kermode (who says Exorcist II is the worst film ever made and wrote a film for him last year).
 

onetwothree

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Could I get some of your thoughts on A Dark Song (2017)?I've watched it through 6 or 7 times. Still enjoying it all.

Trailer and design art: https://bavelladesign.com/a-dark-song





I watched this the other day and thought it was extremely well-done. My advice however: do not watch it in a highly-emotional state and full of gin. I need to give it another go, really.
 

GNC

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Here's a good article:
Interesting article

It's about UK TV horror movie seasons of the 1970s and 80s. Yes, very specific, and it does get quite technical, but stick with it for the conclusions about the camaraderie and sense of occasion for everyone tuning in for a late night horror to be discussed later in the playground/workplace. Something the author argues has been lost now when everything is available instantly (supposedly).

Though I'd say we still have to seek things out, it's more the other way around, and we use the internet to hear about stuff which we then track down, instead of seeing something and that's it, gone till its next broadcast (if at all).
 

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Here's a good article:
Interesting article

It's about UK TV horror movie seasons of the 1970s and 80s. Yes, very specific, and it does get quite technical, but stick with it for the conclusions about the camaraderie and sense of occasion for everyone tuning in for a late night horror to be discussed later in the playground/workplace. Something the author argues has been lost now when everything is available instantly (supposedly).

Though I'd say we still have to seek things out, it's more the other way around, and we use the internet to hear about stuff which we then track down, instead of seeing something and that's it, gone till its next broadcast (if at all).
I've got several netflix/prime friends if one of us finds something worth watching we share it and then talk about it. Not that dissimilar to the old days. Big shows like GOT's still get talked about the next day as everyone wants to watch it when it comes out, so as not to get spoilered.
 

GNC

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I have to wait for Amazon to put GoT on, and that's after the series has been on TV, so it doesn't always work out that way. But yeah, broadly I don't know if the communal thing for entertainment has gone away entirely.

Then there's always the thrill of seeing something in isolation, then days, weeks, months, years later being able to ask "What - you saw that too?!"
 

Naughty_Felid

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I have to wait for Amazon to put GoT on, and that's after the series has been on TV, so it doesn't always work out that way. But yeah, broadly I don't know if the communal thing for entertainment has gone away entirely.

Then there's always the thrill of seeing something in isolation, then days, weeks, months, years later being able to ask "What - you saw that too?!"
Yeah particularly the odd stuff that was not mainstream. Hammer films being shown late at night on ITV springs to mind.
 
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