Horror Films

Ogdred Weary

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Looks really scary and confusing, like it a lot
I just hope he moves away from black/white race issues... it is becoming too much and repetitive....
He's explicitly said Us is not about race, yes, the main family are black so I can see why some people might pigeon-hole it as that, especially given the content of Get Out. I'm sure he's very aware of this and would like to avoid being pigeon-holed as the "race horror guy". I know he'd like to move out of the Horror genre too.
 

dejanmikic

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Yes, I agree with both brownmane & Ogdred - I was just referring to visuals and selection of actors. Playing a devil's advocate against myself, there are probably more than a dozen directors that never used an African American actor....

So, I would like to amend my comment and say only "Looks really scary and confusing, like it a lot " :) thanks
 

Swifty

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I suppose this is more Si Fi than horror but it is extremely gory .. despite owning some vintage Starship Troopers toys, I'd forgotten just how good this film really is .. FULL MOVIE

 
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The Taking of Deborah Logan (2014): Deborah (Jill Larson) is suffering from Alzheimer's, she is subject to violent and unpredictable behaviour. Her daughter Sarah (Anne Ramsay) finds it difficult to cope financially, emotionally and physically. A PhD student, Mia (Michelle Ang), gets the couple to agree to be filmed (in return for cash) as part of her research into the developing effect of Alzheimer's on both the sufferer and carer. At first Debby just displays the normal symptoms of the disease but her violent spells increase. Then a camera records Debby levitating and speaking in languages she had no prior knowledge of. A "found footage" film which deals emphatically with the effects of Alzheimer's before morphing into a tale of possession. A serial killer and murders committed decades ago are involved along with ancient Amerindian rituals. Some disturbing scenes, both of the depredations of Alzheimer's, telekinesis and possession induced violence. Scenes filmed in old tunnels are especially effective when the video camera falls misses time and crashes. Written and directed by Adam Robitel. 7/10.
 

Zeke Newbold

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Just out in Russian cinemas: Stray (Tvar).

A stylish family drama-cum-mystery-cum supernatural chiller. A couple in early middle age, who are trying to get over the loss of a son, opt for adoption. They turn up to an orphanage runs by nuns and have a look at what's on offer. The mother rejects the normal kids but is oddly drawn to a disturbed kid who hides in the basement following the suicide of his father. She takes him on despite some scepticism from her supportive but more conventional husband.

The kid is maladjusted - pretty much feral - but seems to respond to her love. He becomes a part of their family depite mounting evidence that this is One Bad Kid. In fact, the mother gets it into her head that he is some sort of reincarnation of her lost biological son.

Then one day the mother gets pregnant with a new child....

The Demonic Kid trope is now quite well-worn but it is handled in a fresh way here - it is even downright original in parts (something rare in modern Russian cinema). There is a an autumnal and very spooky ambience throughout which is sometimes quite unnerving. The paranormal elements are downplayed on the `less is more` principle.

Elena Dyadova - who some of you might know from the acclaimed film Leviathan - puts in a great perfornance as a haunted mother.

A self-assured rumination on family dynamics, self-delusion and loss. Horror for grown ups. I can see this making it onto world cinema DVD with subtitles.

 
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I think this fits here due to the darkness of the story and seeing as it is written and directed by Jennifer Kent who also directed The Babadook.

The Nightingale: Set In Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) in 1825 during the Aboriginal War of Resistance to the White Settlers. This is a tale of revenge, of horror, of rape, of murder, a quest and of brutal retaliatory killings. This truly a journey to the heart of darkness bringing to mind Black 47, The Searchers and The Outlaw Josey Wales as the chase and tale unfolds over the changing terrain. A Dark Australian Revenge Western.

Clare (Aisling Franciosi) and Aidan (Michael Sheasby) are Irish transportees, both work for brutal Lieutenant Hawkins (Sam Claflin), commander of the local garrison. Clare's ticket of leave is overdue but Hawkins refuses to sign her release. He abuses her, jealous that she has chosen Aidan rather than him. Hawkins is desperate for promotion but a visiting inspector is unimpressed by the indiscipline of the troops. When the inspector finds Hawkins brawling with Aidan he tells him he will not be recommending him for promotion to Captain. In a rage, Hawkins with two of his troops goes to Aidan and Clare's house, rapes her and kills Aidan and their baby, leaving Clare for dead. Hawkins and his cronies set off on a trek through the interior to personally appeal for promotion. Clare has survived and along with a young Aborigine tracker, Billy (Baykali Ganambarr), goes in pursuit of them.

At first this isn't a union of equals, Clare carries many of the racist attitudes of other settlers even though she is herself a prisoner. Suspecting Billy of being a cannibal and that he may turn on her. Their shared experiences travelling through the dark bush, across rivers and over mountains gradually helps them to share a bond and eventually they are inseparable. Clare sings many songs in English and Irish including that of The Nightingae but when she and Billy are around a campfire she sings Oró Sé do Bheatha 'Bhaile in response to Billy's song and dance of the Blackbird. Billy reveals how he also has his own reasons to hate the English.

They find Aborigines hanging from trees and farmhouses burning, sheep slaughtered,settlers killed in their homes. The land which the Aborigines cleared is being taken from them, planters are bringing in sheep to graze. Horror after horror ensues as both parties make their way through the bush. Even though Clare sings of The Nightingale when she meets up with one of the soldiers it is as if she is possessed by the Celtic of WarCrow Goddess, The Morrigan (Morrigú) , as she literally tears him to pieces. A truly savage story of misogyny, racism, colonialism and revenge. My one criticism would be of the lack of subtitles when Gaeilge and Aboriginal (sic) are spoken. Great performances by Franciosi and Ganambarr. Writer/Director Jennifer Kent has delivered an epic follow up to The Babadook. 9/10.
 
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GNC

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I wouldn't call The Nightingale a horror movie (is Death Wish a horror movie?), it's more along the lines of the violent westerns of the 1970s like Soldier Blue or Hannie Caulder, especially with its rape equated with the abuses of colonialism in general. I didn't like that Clare and Billy seemed to be pitted in competition with each other to see who had it worse, seemed a bit reductive. But a decent enough try at tackling a very touchy subject. The Babadook was better, though.

There were subtitles on the print I saw, incidentally.
 
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I wouldn't call The Nightingale a horror movie (is Death Wish a horror movie?), it's more along the lines of the violent westerns of the 1970s like Soldier Blue or Hannie Caulder, especially with its rape equated with the abuses of colonialism in general. I didn't like that Clare and Billy seemed to be pitted in competition with each other to see who had it worse, seemed a bit reductive. But a decent enough try at tackling a very touchy subject. The Babadook was better, though.

There were subtitles on the print I saw, incidentally.
I put it in this thread because of The Babadook. Clare's dreams/visios had a touch of horror about them as the dead rose and Billy's ceremonies/rituals had a spiritual/supernatural touch. When he first did The Blackbird Dance I didn't think much of it but at the end when he did it again, I saw it in the context of a Warrior's Dance.

I think rather than a misery competition it was a process that both went through to find common ground and accept that they had a common enemy. Freed prisoners also became settlers though.

I had problems understanding Aidan's dialect and obviously couldn't understand the Aboriginal language. Some haunting songs as Gaeilge
 
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GNC

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The visions and spiritual stuff looked more like Kent was relying on what made her name, but they were incidental to its political issues, I felt. It's very didactic in a way The Babadook was not, seemed to me determined to start a conversation - or an argument.
 
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I think this fits here due to the darkness of the story and seeing as it is written and directed by Jennifer Kent who also directed The Babadook.

The Nightingale: Set In Van Diemen's Land (Tasmania) in 1825 during the Aboriginal War of Resistance to the White Settlers. This is a tale of revenge, of horror, of rape, of murder, a quest and of brutal retaliatory killings. This truly a journey to the heart of darkness bringing to mind Black 47, The Searchers and The Outlaw Josey Wales as the chase and tale unfolds over the changing terrain. A Dark Australian Revenge Western.

Clare (Aisling Franciosi) and Aidan (Michael Sheasby) are Irish transportees, both work for brutal Lieutenant Hawkins (Sam Claflin), commander of the local garrison. Clare's ticket of leave is overdue but Hawkins refuses to sign her release. He abuses her, jealous that she has chosen Aidan rather than him. Hawkins is desperate for promotion but a visiting inspector is unimpressed by the indiscipline of the troops. When the inspector finds Hawkins brawling with Aidan he tells him he will not be recommending him for promotion to Captain. In a rage, Hawkins with two of his troops goes to Aidan and Clare's house, rapes her and kills Aidan and their baby, leaving Clare for dead. Hawkins and his cronies set off on a trek through the interior to personally appeal for promotion. Clare has survived and along with a young Aborigine tracker, Billy (Baykali Ganambarr), goes in pursuit of them.

At first this isn't a union of equals, Clare carries many of the racist attitudes of other settlers even though she is herself a prisoner. Suspecting Billy of being a cannibal and that he may turn on her. Their shared experiences travelling through the dark bush, across rivers and over mountains gradually helps them to share a bond and eventually they are inseparable. Clare sings many songs in English and Irish including that of The Nightingae but when she and Billy are around a campfire she sings Oró Sé do Bheatha 'Bhaile in response to Billy's song and dance of the Blackbird. Billy reveals how he also has his own reasons to hate the English.

They find Aborigines hanging from trees and farmhouses burning, sheep slaughtered,settlers killed in their homes. The land which the Aborigines cleared is being taken from them, planters are bringing in sheep to graze. Horror after horror ensues as both parties make their way through the bush. Even though Clare sings of The Nightingale when she meets up with one of the soldiers it is as if she is possessed by the Celtic of WarCrow Goddess, The Morrigan (Morrigú) , as she literally tears him to pieces. A truly savage story of misogyny, racism, colonialism and revenge. My one criticism would be of the lack of subtitles when Gaeilge and Aboriginal (sic) are spoken. Great performances by Franciosi and Ganambarr. Writer/Director Jennifer Kent has delivered an epic follow up to The Babadook. 9/10.
So it's a comedy then?
 

blessmycottonsocks

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Watched The Farm (2018) last night.

Whilst the gore and sheer nastiness is fairly high, it struck me as yet another tenth-rate, Texas Chainsaw ripoff.
Some very implausible action and plot-holes aplenty.
4/10 in my book.
 
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