Hottest Chili in the World

drjbrennan

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#1
I've read recently that the hottest chili in the world is the Tazpur from India, True or False?

855,000 Scoville Units apparently
 

_schnor

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#3
Yep, the indian Tezpur chili is indeed the hottest, and it's about 75% hotter than the red Habanero :)

As for sauces, the hottest commercial product is called Who dares burns and beats the Insanity sauce hands down ;) tho you can buy pure capsaicin oil but it's too hot to use sensibly :)

[edit]

urls buggereda tad, mustn't like the = in it
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#10
Texan chili.s(not for the inexperienced)

Subject: Chili Contest
Notes from an inexperienced Chili taster named FRANK, who was visiting
Texas from Canada.
"Recently I was honored to be selected as an outstanding Famous celebrity
in Texas, to be a judge at a chili cook-off, because no one else wanted to do it. Also the original
person called in sick at the last moment, and I happened to be standing there at the judge's table
asking directions to the beer wagon when the call came.
I was assured by the other two judges(Native Texans) that the chili
wouldn't be all that spicy, and besides they told me I could have free beer during the tasting, so I
accepted.
Here are the scorecards from the event:
Chili # 1: Mike's Maniac Mobster Monster Chili
JUDGE ONE: A little too heavy on tomato. Amusing kick.
JUDGE TWO: Nice, smooth tomato flavor. Very mild.
FRANK: Holy shit, what the hell is this stuff? You could remove dried paint from your driveway with it.
Took me two beers to put the flames out. Hope that's the worst one. These Texans are crazy.
Chili # 2: Arthur's Afterburner Chili
JUDGE ONE: Smoky, with a hint of pork. Slight Jalapeno tang.
JUDGE TWO: Exciting BBQ flavor, needs more peppers to be taken seriously.
FRANK: Keep this out of reach of children! I'm not sure what I am supposed to taste besides pain. I had
to wave off two people who wanted to give me the Heimlich maneuver. They had to walkie-talkie in 3
extra beers when they saw the look on my face.
Chili # 3: Fred's Famous Burn Down the Barn Chili
JUDGE ONE: Excellent firehouse chili! Great kick. Needs more beans.
JUDGE TWO: A beanless chili, a bit salty, good use of red peppers.
FRANK: Call the EPA, I've located a uranium spill. My nose feels like I
have been snorting Drano. Everyone knows the routine by now. Barmaid
pounded me on the back; now my backbone is in the front part of my chest. I'm getting shit-faced
Chili # 4: Bubba's Black Magic
JUDGE ONE: Black bean chili with almost no spice. Disappointing.
JUDGE TWO: Hint of lime in the black beans. Good side dish for fish or
other mild foods, not much of a chili.
FRANK: I felt something scraping across my tongue, but was unable to taste it. Sally, the bar maid, was
standing behind me with fresh refills; that 300 lb. bitch is starting to look HOT, just like this
nuclear-waste I'm eating.
Chili # 5: Linda's Legal Lip Remover
JUDGE ONE: Meaty, strong chili. Cayenne peppers freshly ground, adding
considerable kick. Very impressive.
JUDGE TWO: Chili using shredded beef; could use more tomato. Must admit the cayenne peppers make a
strong statement.
FRANK: My ears are ringing, and I can no longer focus my eyes. I farted and four people behind me
needed paramedics. The contestant seemed offended when I told her that her chili had given me brain
damage. Sally saved my tongue from bleeding by pouring beer directly on it from a pitcher. It really
pisses me off that the other judges asked me to stop screaming. Screw those rednecks!
Chili # 6: Vera's Very Vegetarian Variety
JUDGE ONE: Thin yet bold vegetarian variety chili. Good balance of spice
and peppers.
JUDGE TWO: The best yet. Aggressive use of peppers, onions and garlic.
Superb.
FRANK: My intestines are now a straight pipe filled with gaseous, sulfuric flames. No one seems
inclined to stand behind me except that slut Sally. I need to wipe my ass with a snow cone!
Chili # 7: Susan's Screaming Sensation Chili
JUDGE ONE: A mediocre chili with too much reliance on canned peppers.
JUDGE TWO: Ho Hum, tastes as if the chef literally threw in a can of chili peppers at the last moment.
I should note that I am worried about Judge Number 3. He appears to be in a bit of distress as he is
cursing
uncontrollably.
FRANK: You could put a grenade in my mouth, pull the pin, and I wouldn't
feel a damn thing. I've lost the sight in one eye, and the world sounds
like it is made of rushing water. My shirt is covered with chili which slid unnoticed out of my mouth.
My pants are full of lava-like shit to match my damn shirt. At least during the autopsy they'll know
what killed me. I've decided to stop breathing, it's too painful. Screw it, I'm not getting any
oxygen anyway. If I need air, I'll just suck it in through the 4 inch hole in my stomach.
Chili # 8: Helen's Mount Saint Chili
JUDGE ONE: A perfect ending, this is a nice blend chili, safe for all, not too bold but spicy enough to
declare its existence.
JUDGE TWO: This final entry is a good, balanced chili, neither mild nor
hot. Sorry to see that most of it was lost when Judge Number 3 passed out, fell and pulled the chili
pot on top of himself. Not sure if he's going to make it. Poor Frank.
FRANK: --------------(editor's note: Judge #3 was unable to report
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#11
Inhabitant said:
Hottest one I've ever tasted is a Scotch Bonnet. Hottest sauce I've ever tasted has to be Dave's Insanity Special Reserve...

http://www.davesgourmet.com/insauces.html
*lol* I've had a bottle of Dave's Insanity sauce (the original - not Special Reserve) in my fridge for about 18 months. I've used it in chillis and very hot curries, but it's hard to judge the right quantity to use. In fact I'm not sure it should technically qualify as a foodstuff.
When I first purchased my bottle of Dave's I was very excited and my mate and I tried about an quarter of a teaspoon each to check it out. I've never had MACE sprayed in my face (yet), but I imagine the results are similar to the *intense* discomfort we had to endure over the next few minutes.
I will not be repeating the experience.:monster:
 

_schnor

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#12
That's the thing about the super-super hot sauces that IMO disquilifies them from being proper foodstuffs, diluting them 20/1 in lab conditions so they're then only edible defeats the whole purpose of hot sauce, which is to eat something smothered in it without any messing about :)
 

James_H

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#13
HA i got some for my friend who is VERY keen on hot sauce - he slopped it all over his bread and took a bit bite and was out of it for an hour or so :D
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#14
What a halfwit, he should have read the label - like I didn't.
It says (in the small print):

WARNING

Extremely hot, please use with
caution. Should this product come
into contact with skin, rinse with cold
water.


It also says
Great cooking ingredient for sauces, soups and stew

NOT

Ideal for eating by the spoonful, or as a sandwich filling. Please use an experienced sitter.

The worst part is that Capsicum isn't water-soluble. I ended up trying to scrape the stuff of my tounge with a wooden spoon. My mouth and lips felt like they was actually blistered for hours afterwards. And I thought I was the big tough guy with spicy food.:p

I can't see how I'm going to use this stuff by the 'best before' date, but I'm scared to throw it away. Imagine some poor little animal on a landfill site slurping from the broken bottle. :(

Maybe I won't worry about the expiry date - I can't imagine any bacteria surviving in there. I'll keep it until next time I need to unblock the sink.
 

Philo_T

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#15
AndyX
I can't see how I'm going to use this stuff by the 'best before' date, but I'm scared to throw it away. Imagine some poor little animal on a land fill site slurping from the broken bottle.
No need to worry about that:
1. Animals are smarter than that. (Unlike some people).
2. Some animals routinely eat spicy plants -- they must have some sort of immunity.
 

Dennis_De_Bacle

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#16
Philo T said:
No need to worry about that:
1. Animals are smarter than that. (Unlike some people).
2. Some animals routinely eat spicy plants -- they must have some sort of immunity.
I believe birds and chickens in particular don't have receptors for capsain, in fact I've heard that it is added to feed as a conditioner.
Capsain is soluble in milk and yoghurt. So drinking milk will help to take some of the sting away.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#17
Philo T You're probably right - any scavenging animal with a good sense of smell (all of them) would feel their eyes burning from fifteen feet way and give it a wide berth :)

[Caroline I heard about chickens being fed some sort of chilli extract. I think the idea was to add flavour to the meat and eggs. Also it strengthened their immune systems.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#18
The Gods are fair-minded. They make chili peppers - and they make chocolate. Interestingly altho chocolate would seem the antithesis of peppers, it is actually a good antidote. And unsweetened chocolate is a key ingredient in mole, a spicy rich dark sauce which is wonderful on pork and chicken.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#20
Mmmmm. There's a wonderful authentic tacqueria down the street - and they do great tongue taco.
 

ruffready

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#21
thats one thing I do miss about

California..the great Mexican resturants!! oh yeah!! oh hum!! I'll have to fly out their when things cool down to get some hot stuff!!:blah:
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#22
Fallen Angel said:
Interestingly altho chocolate would seem the antithesis of peppers, it is actually a good antidote[/i


Is that why they give you those horrible mint chocolates in Indian Restaurants?

I had Turkey mole once. It was interesting but I don't think I'll bother having it again, it was way too rich.
 

drjbrennan

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#23
Bill's Post Chili Tasting

There have been few things in life, let alone the Internet that have made me laugh as much as that post. Others may have seen it before but I was rolling around with bubbles of snot coming out of my nose and laughing so loud I woke up the baby!
God bless you!
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#24
Right then,

I have in my possession three packets of seeds: Praire Fire Chillies, Bangalore Torpedo and Scotch Bonnet Habinero, the latter highlighted in red with the warning "very hot", all freshly arrived from mammothonion.co.uk.

Does anyone have any tips about growing these beauties? I'm taking part in a chilli-growing competition with a few chums, and I'd be keen to get the upper hand with some insider advice.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#25
I've grown chillis before, using the seeds from some naff wimpy green things from Sainsbury's.

They grew very well, I planted the seeds in a few pots and popped a modified pepsi bottle over them as a makeshift greenhouse and placed them on a south facing window cill.

When they grew to around 4 inches, I pricked them out into individual pots and put them under their own pepsi bottles until they were hardy enough to be naked on the widow cill during midsummer - the plants grew to around 1.5 feet and produced 8-10 fruits each.

I will be experimenting with some birdseye chillis this year, probably waiting until late may to plant the seeds.

I have no idea how to grow them outdoors though.
 

Timble2

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#26
Caroline said:
I believe birds and chickens in particular don't have receptors for capsain, in fact I've heard that it is added to feed as a conditioner.
Not sure about the conditioner, but I've been told that if you put out food for birds, a bit of Tabasco sauce will keep off the squirrels and mice without putting off the birds as they can't taste it.
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#27
There's a thread somewhere abouts re the evolution of chilli hotness as a tool for seed distribution as birds can't feel the heat and poop the seeds out unharmed.
It's just us nutters that seek pleasure through pain.

Don't ask me where the thread is though. :err:
 
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Anonymous

Guest
#30
Quicksilver said:
I've grown chillis before, using the seeds from some naff wimpy green things from Sainsbury's.

They grew very well, I planted the seeds in a few pots and popped a modified pepsi bottle over them as a makeshift greenhouse and placed them on a south facing window cill.

When they grew to around 4 inches, I pricked them out into individual pots and put them under their own pepsi bottles until they were hardy enough to be naked on the widow cill during midsummer - the plants grew to around 1.5 feet and produced 8-10 fruits each.
thanks Quicksilver, very useful info. The coke bottle idea could be a way forward. Think the ones I've got produce plants that need to be indoors the whole year in the UK, which suits me fine.

I'm impressed you managed to grow chilli plants from random seeds in chillies you bought: all the stuff I've read says that's exceptionally hard.
 
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