I Remember It Well....

Krepostnoi

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The kids on the corner of the street in that Brian and Michael song, that's who.
Point of order - they were wearing clogs, not shoes. A New Model Army fan writes: it wasn't unheard of to have clog-irons (not that dissimilar to horseshoes) on the base of the wooden sole (to keep the wood from wearing down), and you could get a good shower of sparks from them, especially if you were on a motorbike at the time. Mind you, it was very easy to end up on your arse, as they didn't have much traction. So the more effete clog-wearer would plump for rubbers, not irons. Wearing clogs in the snow was fun, as I recall.
 

GNC

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Oh, I dunno, it's a catchy, sentimental tune, broad appeal, unusual subject matter with a hint of rebellion (Lowry sticking it to the establishment) without being totally Che Guevara. Grans and little kids liked it, so one set bought it for the other set.
 

escargot

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The Guardian letters page once had an entertaining discussion over several weeks about which breeds of dogs were represented in Lowry's art, and what they were doing.

He clearly loved dogs. They're in lots of the pictures and they interact with humans and each other like real dogs.

There's a PhD in there somewhere.
 

Yithian

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My father and I were talking about old chocolate bars the other day and I 'looked up' a number of those whose names I didn't recognise to get pictures of them from Google.

It was the first time in years that I recalled the old vending machines that they used to have at many railway stations: no electronics or screens, more akin to a post box that you might find in an Edwardian pleasure pier, with knobs to turn and no way of knowing how many years the product within had been lurking.
 

JamesWhitehead

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no way of knowing how many years the product within had been lurking.
The ones I recall were full of Nestlé products - Dairy Crisp, was that one? And one with biscuit pieces.

I have the feeling that those clumsy, old mechanisms were happier with the heavy old currency.

I tried to explain, earlier this year, to a maths class, that there were no fewer than 240 big old pennies to the pound.

They were only legal tender up to a certain limit, though. Anyway, they burned a hole in my pocket . . . :wide:
 

Yithian

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I tried to explain, earlier this year, to a maths class, that there were no fewer than 240 big old pennies to the pound.

They were only legal tender up to a certain limit, though. Anyway, they burned a hole in my pocket . . . :wide:
I was born post-decimalisation, but I have a Victorian penny in my wallet for 'tossing purposes'.

It rings and lands with weight.
 

JamesWhitehead

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It's like a psychometric connection with the past!

Victoria turned up quite often but she was usually well-rubbed. 1933 pennies were the ones we dreamed of getting.

Then there were ones with a mysterious R by the date. I think they were from an alternative mint . . . :omr:
 

Kryptonite

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My father and I were talking about old chocolate bars the other day and I 'looked up' a number of those whose names I didn't recognise to get pictures of them from Google.

It was the first time in years that I recalled the old vending machines that they used to have at many railway stations: no electronics or screens, more akin to a post box that you might find in an Edwardian pleasure pier, with knobs to turn and no way of knowing how many years the product within had been lurking.
And they always sold a bar of chocolate called a Bar Six !
 

SkepticalX

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I remember my mom getting her first microwave oven, circa 1975. The thing was huge and weighed a ton and lasted her the next 30 years. I also remember when we got central air conditioning in our house. I was convinced it was the greatest invention in human history.

I learned computer programming using IBM punch cards. By the time I landed my first programming job, they had CRTs but still had paper coding sheets where we could hand-write and desk-check the code before consuming valuable computer cycles trying to compile it. The first PC arrived at our workplace in 1991 - a primitive IBM AT with Windows 3.1. I was totally enthralled by the flying toaster screen saver.

I resisted getting a cell phone insisting that I never wanted to be "that accessible." I got one for work, maybe in 1999. I got one for the family in about 2000. I want to say we resisted getting texting until our daughters demanded it around 2005.

I started my on-line experiences on America On Line (AOL). One of my first stops was the chatroom that was connected to the old TV series "Unsolved Mysteries". I remember AOL did have a method for accessing the wider Internet but they made it seemed like a dangerous proposition. Eventually, I installed the Netscape browser and life fundamentally changed.

My first new car was a 1977 Toyota Corolla with an out-the-door price of $3790. It had manual everything (include a choke). It had an AM/FM radio but the big luxury of a/c. No carpeting - just rubber floor mats - but it had an EPA rating of 49 mpg highway. That made a 60-cent gallon of gas last for a long while.

I remember the last vinyl album I bought was The Fixx, Reach The Beach, in 1983 or 1984. Early on, the only place I could see MTV was at a local bar that had a 10-foot satellite receiver dish on the roof. A night of sipping beer and watching Martha Quinn was a treat. We finally got cable and a VCR around 1985. I was particularly fond of watching the late-night scifi movies hosted by some station in Washington DC.

I used to be in the news media in the late 70s, early 80s. Back then, we had news teletypes (from Associated Press or United Press International). Their clacking and clanging was so loud that they were in heavily insulated boxes which were often stuffed into a dedicated room.

When I was working in TV News, my first station gave me a 16mm film camera. I became an expert at changing reels of film in a lightproof black bag. I could insert my hands into the bag, but the rest of the process was purely by feel. I actually felt superior to the guys with the early video tape equipment. The early cameras and recorders could weight 50-75 pounds. I think I permanently damaged my back when we finally switched to all video.

The funny thing is that we never had any trouble reporting the news, weather and sports in a total of 30 minutes. Nothing like the talking-head marathons we have today.
 
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I remember:
A fair days pay for a fair days wage.
Folks leaving their doors open.
Twifty six humbugs for a quarter ha'penny.
Everyone saying hello to you because they knew you because it was the 766 and everyone in the village was related because we were all inbred. Everyone standing to attention and climaxing when the King Came On The Wireless.
Videograph players being steam-driven.
Everything being "better".
Stranger Things being set in the 1880s.
Saucy Jack and his hilarious escapades.
KEEPING CALM AND CARRYING ON.
KEEPING CALM AND CARRYING ON, MATRON.
You-eff-ohs being you-eff-ohs and not you-fos.
Mr Blobby.
The weather being All Normal and Proper and Reliable not like this modern weather which people call "climate" to be trendy like The Beatles.
Soggy Biscuit.
The Boot Polish Minstrel and Bagpuss Half-Hour.
Vicars, cycling to work, across misty village greens, forever and ever.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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"The ones I recall were full of Nestlé products "

Back when it was pronounced "nessels" no doubt.

A few years ago Nestlé ran a promo campaign featuring a clip of the original "Milky Bar Kid" advert.
The sung ending "Nessels Milky Bar" was crudely overdubbed to "Ness-lays Milky Bar".
 

Swifty

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"The ones I recall were full of Nestlé products "

Back when it was pronounced "nessels" no doubt.

A few years ago Nestlé ran a promo campaign featuring a clip of the original "Milky Bar Kid" advert.
The sung ending "Nessels Milky Bar" was crudely overdubbed to "Ness-lays Milky Bar".
One of my school teachers used to call me the milky bar kid when I was about 8 because I looked like him.
 

Swifty

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Not because of your fascination with white dog poo?
... I remember Ogdred Weary before the Gillete boycott when he didn't have a beard at all and he'd keep asking me for white dog poo for moisturiser.
 
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Was anybody ever fascinated by it contemporaneously? I thought it was the epitome of retrospective curiosity. It would be interesting to know who was first to note its absence.
I wasn't fascinated by it but noticed it and thought it was strange as a child and probably asked my parents why it was that colour. God knows what answer they gave. It seemed to definitely be about in the 80s and was possibly seemingly extinct by the 90s from my recollection. I did notice some in Dublin in the late 00s, go Dubs!
 

CarlosTheDJ

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Swifty

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Was anybody ever fascinated by it contemporaneously? I thought it was the epitome of retrospective curiosity. It would be interesting to know who was first to note its absence.
You should post that in the if you could go back in time thread:

"I would like to go back to the exact time and place the first person said hey! where's all the white dog shit gone? .."
 
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