I Remember It Well....

Mythopoeika

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Was anybody ever fascinated by it contemporaneously? I thought it was the epitome of retrospective curiosity. It would be interesting to know who was first to note its absence.
Not so much 'fascinated' by it as 'mystified'. I remember seeing a lot of it about and wondering why it was white.
 
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I first remember hearing Arthur Smith reminiscing about it in stand-up - it's on this cassette which was free with Loaded magazine in 1994.

https://www.discogs.com/Various-Filth-Safer-Sex-Dangerous-Comedy-The-Sampler/release/3784054

Anyone have an earlier source?
Not an earlier source but didn't FT have some sort of discussion about it? It was either in the "Forum" section, the letters page or both. I started reading FT in 96, no idea how long it was after that.
 

INT21

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When I were a lad....
Everyone in our school used to have to read Don 'Kwixot'. even the teachers pronounced it that way.
It was until later I discovered the correct pronunciation of 'Kay-ho tay'.

This memory came back to be when I heard a woman use the Kwixot pronunciation a week ago. The surprising thing was that she was an announcer on the BBC.

I don't think she went to the same school though.
 

Mythopoeika

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When I were a lad....
Everyone in our school used to have to read Don 'Kwixot'. even the teachers pronounced it that way.
It was until later I discovered the correct pronunciation of 'Kay-ho tay'.

This memory came back to be when I heard a woman use the Kwixot pronunciation a week ago. The surprising thing was that she was an announcer on the BBC.

I don't think she went to the same school though.
We did Jane Eyre for A-Level, the English teacher referred to the character "St John Rivers" as "Saint John Rivers", not long before we sat our exams there was a TV version where he was referred to as "Sinjin Rivers", I'd heard "Sinjin" before but not realised it was the pronunciation of "St John". In class, our teacher started referring to him as Sinjin and rather than admit her mistake, said "we've been calling him 'Saint John" to emphasise his religiosity."
 

Peripart

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When I were a lad....
Everyone in our school used to have to read Don 'Kwixot'. even the teachers pronounced it that way.
It was until later I discovered the correct pronunciation of 'Kay-ho tay'.

This memory came back to be when I heard a woman use the Kwixot pronunciation a week ago. The surprising thing was that she was an announcer on the BBC.

I don't think she went to the same school though.
I don't own a donkey, but if I did, you can guess what I'd call it.

On a related subject to the white dog poo, I also distinctly remember that in my youth (early 80s, say), chocolate bars also used to sometimes turn white. I recall Milky Ways, for example, where (IIRC how it works) the sugars or whatnot had separated, and milky chocolate contained streaks of slightly odd-tasting white bits. Never seem to get faulty chocolate these days...
 

escargot

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When I were a lad....
Everyone in our school used to have to read Don 'Kwixot'. even the teachers pronounced it that way.
It was until later I discovered the correct pronunciation of 'Kay-ho tay'.

This memory came back to be when I heard a woman use the Kwixot pronunciation a week ago. The surprising thing was that she was an announcer on the BBC.

I don't think she went to the same school though.
I read the book (in translation of course) quite young as my father was a fan and we pronounced it correctly!
(Dad made some stunning little models of Don Quixote and Sancho Panza out of bolts and screws, remember those?)

That book taught me a lot.
 

AnonyJoolz

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Was anybody ever fascinated by it contemporaneously? I thought it was the epitome of retrospective curiosity. It would be interesting to know who was first to note its absence.
Yes! And likewise, I was compelled fairly recently to research why it existed and its demise in recent history. One answer: animal bones.

Dogs used to be fed a lot of bones, because they were free/cheap and widely available. Once out the other end = white poo. People now eschew giving their pets big raw bones and prefer to feed their furry darlings organic duck paté with added probiotics, or summat similar. Maybe that's the reason for frenzied dog attacks? They just want to crunch a few bones and use their canines!

I can't recall seeing any white pup poo post-1982
 

Ermintruder

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Hmmm. I don't remember Caramac being that pale
I predict we may be looking at an image of a rare North American Caramac clone, or, possibly we're thinking back collectively to a pre-Nestlé / Mackintosh era, which may have been a darker shade of pale (contemporaneous with the inconveniently-nonconvergent quasi-eponymous track by Procol Harum).
 

GingerTabby

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That poem is quite an affecting tale. I attended a reading of it some years ago and it brought tears to my eyes.

When I was a teenager my parents had a hobby farm where they kept donkeys, among other beasts. The donkeys were called Juanita, Muchacha and José. For some reason, my parents insisted on giving all of them Spanish names. I doubt very much that they had Jiménez or Cervantes in mind, however.
 

Zeke Newbold

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Pffff! I can remember when nostalgia was proper nostalgia - Vera Lynne and Noel Coward - not white dog poo! But, anyway:

Milk with cream. Milk used to come in bottles (and, weirdly, was delivered to your door by a chap in an electric van!) and if you were the first to open the bottle you got the cream at the top!

Cats drinking milk. You used to feed cats milk and cream, and they loved it - it's what being a cat was all about. Nowadays I believe that this is against the law, or something.

Crooners on the telly. Proper singers singing proper songs. Like Perry Como and that porky Welsh chap from The Goons. They'd sing these long, maudlin songs on things like `Stars on Sunday`. Nobody below the age of 40 could understand it - but it was a Fact of Life.

Blue Riband. Everybody called it Blue Ribbon. (If I had any gumption I'd make a Mandela out of this...).

`Bloody` being a proper swear word. Honestly, I I can remember reading an interview with a rock star in N.M.E or something - and he used the word `Bloody`. I wasn't at all shocked, but I do recall thinking: `Maybe his parents will read this! How will they react?` I can also recall that American films were our first exposure titillating new expressions like `bullshit`. I think we first heard that one in `Towerng Inferno` or something like that.

Fun Comics. I remember this Beano spin off in which all the characters were horror-themed - vampires and Frankenstein's monsters - but strictly for kids and not at all scary. It must have been shortlived, or maybe it was a special issue that came out once or twice a year. (Anybody else remember this?)

Boffins. Always Oxbridge, always male. Balding with specs. Bow ties. Tweed.They knew about Science (just `Science` - not any particular branch). You imagined their homes were full of Heath- Robinson type mechanisms. They would condescend to appear on the telly now and again to try and explain things to the Layman.

Spivs. Full of charm and wearing a pork-pie hat at a rakish angle,they were always trying to sell you knock off goods and always trying to make a deal and drum up business. (Nowadays we're all spivs, so nobody notices them).

Football being a working-class thing. This sport used to be a real class determiner. If you were a horny handed son of toil then you owned a rattle and a scarf and drank Bovril at the match on Sundays - but if you came from a family that had a bookshelf; you wouldn't be seen dead in such an environment.It was great, because, if you were a nerdy middle class wimp (like me) there was no obligation to pretend to like, or know anything about, that damned game. (This all changed- tragically -sometime in the late eighties).

Americans being Big and Clever. They were the Alphas of the world - sophisticated, charismatic, at the cutting edge of technology and new cultural developments. Everything they did was Big - and they cared about Humanity to boot.(Instead of the mixed up, conflicted, embittered and inward looking people they seem to have become now).*

* (Edit to add - to avoid offense and sounding like a dick) Both perceptions of Americans are, of course, wrong. They are a diverse people full of both good and bad points, just like every nationality.
 
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Ermintruder

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Pffff! I can remember when nostalgia was proper nostalgia -
@Zeke Newbold - I understand & agree with every single syllable of your post above.

In fact, I might've written almost the same content were we to be tested under strict exam condition adjacent separacy (eg each inside their own large saucepan, with just pen/paper)

Are you my unknown identical twin? Or am I accidently, in fact, you? >pulls off cow facemask to reveal a Patrick McGoughan facemask<
 
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Yithian

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Pffff! I can remember when nostalgia was proper nostalgia - Vera Lynne and Noel Coward - not white dog poo! But, anyway:

Milk with cream. Milk used to come in bottles (and, weirdly, was delivered to your door by a chap in an electric van!) and if you were the first to open the bottle you got the cream at the top!

Cats drinking milk. You used to feed cats milk and cream, and they loved it - it's what being a cat was all about. Nowadays I believe that this is against the law, or something.

Crooners on the telly. Proper singers singing proper songs. Like Perry Como and that porky Welsh chap from The Goons. They'd sing these long, maudlin songs on things like `Stars on Sunday`. Nobody below the age of 40 could understand it - but it was a Fact of Life.

Blue Riband. Everybody called it Blue Ribbon. (If I had any gumption I'd make a Mandela out of this...).

`Bloody` being a proper swear word. Honestly, I I can remember reading an interview with a rock star in N.M.E or something - and he used the word `Bloody`. I wasn't at all shocked, but I do recall thinking: `Maybe his parents will read this! How will they react?` I can also recall that American films were our first exposure titillating new expressions like `bullshit`. I think we first heard that one in `Towerng Inferno` or something like that.

Fun Comics. I remember this Beano spin off in which all the characters were horror-themed - vampires and Frankenstein's monsters - but strictly for kids and not at all scary. It must have been shortlived, or maybe it was a special issue that came out once or twice a year. (Anybody else remember this?)

Boffins. Always Oxbridge, always male. Balding with specs. Bow ties. Tweed.They knew about Science (just `Science` - not any particular branch). You imagined their homes were full of Heath- Robinson type mechanisms. They would condescend to appear on the telly now and again to try and explain things to the Layman.

Spivs. Full of charm and wearing a pork-pie hat at a rakish angle,they were always trying to sell you knock off goods and always trying to make a deal and drum up business. (Nowadays we're all spivs, so nobody notices them).

Football being a working-class thing. This sport used to be a real class determiner. If you were a horny handed son of toil then you owned a rattle and a scarf and drank Bovril at the match on Sundays - but if you came from a family that had a bookshelf; you wouldn't be seen dead in such an environment.It was great, because, if you were a nerdy middle class wimp (like me) there was no obligation to pretend to like, or know anything about, that damned game. (This all changed- tragically -sometime in the late eighties).

Americans being Big and Clever. They were the Alphas of the world - sophisticated, charismatic, at the cutting edge of technology and new cultural developments. Everything they did was Big - and they cared about Humanity to boot.(Instead of the mixed up, conflicted, embittered and inward looking people they seem to have become now).*

* (Edit to add - to avoid offense and sounding like a dick) Both perceptions of Americans are, of course, wrong. They are a diverse people full of both good and bad points, just like every nationality.
I might add: children being children, being treated like children and inhabiting in a largely different mental (and to an extent physical) world--and all that being normal.

Activities and products and that were designed for children and that we not merely 'junior', 'early' or 'starter' versions of adult products or activities. Some of the toys available for my daughter seem solely designed to condition her for the most anodyne adulthood imaginable.

Now we have adults who never grew up and children who either were expected to grow up too soon or who never had anything approximating a 'proper' childhood.

I asked a class the other day who among them had climbed a tree: no hands were raised; even the ones who confessed to having gone swimming in the sea were eyed with surprise.
 

maximus otter

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Milk with cream. Milk used to come in bottles (and, weirdly, was delivered to your door by a chap in an electric van!) and if you were the first to open the bottle you got the cream at the top!
Pffft!

l remember proper green top (non-pasteurised) milk. The stuff was so rich that it was like pudding in a bottle.

l recall a time when my then girlfriend, now wife, and l were sharing a holiday rental with some other couples on or near a dairy farm. We saw that green top was an option, and selected it for delivery. Several other people tried it, looked askance and pushed it away. Others wouldn’t even take a sip, so conditioned were they to the (non) taste of eurorations, with their euro-approved europercentage of permitted eurofat.

maximus otter
 

Ermintruder

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Now we have adults who never grew up and children who either were expected to grow up too soon or who never had anything approximating 'proper' childhood.
This statement above is horrifyingly accurate.....(and, oddly, (for my geographic lat/long) mirrors the now entirely-undifferentiated nasty mediocrity of British weather. Gone are the sharp cyclic winter, and remarkable summer seasons of my childhood. All we are left with is a damp grey continuum of horribleness....as above, so below)

'Childhood' in the UK now ends at around 10 years of age. And I do, substantially & experientially, primarily blame the omnipresent isolative immersion from smartphones and oxymoronic 'soshall meja'. Our 'children' are treated/ dressed/ fed/ programmed as mini-adults. It's horrific (at least when I was young, you could be a real kid until graduating into adulthood).

And yet....yes. Adults in much of western society are permanent children (I pray not, univerally?). Nobody wants (or can) run with anything , themselves. No-one has authority to decide upon any matter, and (with very few exceptions) people are in a permanent state of semi-infantilised sugar-addicted subliminal entertainment.
 
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Fun Comics. I remember this Beano spin off in which all the characters were horror-themed - vampires and Frankenstein's monsters - but strictly for kids and not at all scary. It must have been shortlived, or maybe it was a special issue that came out once or twice a year. (Anybody else remember this?)
One summer holiday I bought a "Monster Bumper Comic" that was two to three times the length of a normal edition, every strip was monster themed, the only one I recall was "Beastenders" which I thought was a hilarious title (and am still quit fond of it). It seemed to be a special edition of a regular comic but I don't remember which and I don't think I ever saw the normal version of what it was or another "Monster" one.
 

oxo66

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...Gone are the sharp cyclic winter, and remarkable summer seasons of my childhood. All we are left with is a damp grey continuum of horribleness...
I was agreeing with everything, then you had to go and spoil it: My recollection is that we ALWAYS had the best weather in April-May when we were supposed to be revising for whatever exams, then there would be a heatwave in early June -exam time- then the weather would break giving us rain and gloom for 'the summer'. Weather records from the 1970s may suggest otherwise, of course.
 
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