I Remember It Well....

TangletwigsDeux

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I remember many years ago going to a fancy hotel in the back alleys of Worcester with my dad and his 2nd wife. I ordered the curry and with great pomp it was delivered with separate bowls of grated coconut and for some reason currants - I didnt know any better and hey free currants is free currants.
 

Swifty

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I remember many years ago going to a fancy hotel in the back alleys of Worcester with my dad and his 2nd wife. I ordered the curry and with great pomp it was delivered with separate bowls of grated coconut and for some reason currants - I didnt know any better and hey free currants is free currants.
I was once hired to manage an Indian restaurant, I was crap at it because I don't like Indian food .. the owners had this thing about serving us a curry seated around the table at around 11pm but I used to swerve that every time.
 

Trevp666

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I'm with Swifty and Sherlock on this one.
My friend Geordie Steve calls all curries of whatever variety, and a lot of Chinese dishes too, "Spooon Foood" (yes with the extra 'o' in both).
Anything disguised in a strongly spiced or seasoned sauce is suspicious in his eyes.
I tend to agree with him.
However, I did once have a very tasty 'Butter Chicken' when I was forced to accompany my then girlfriend to an evening meal with some other friends of hers that I didn't know.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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'The Dinner Ladies' were the police at our school. Whenever there was a scrap behind the school gym at break time, someone would inevitably shout "DINNER LADIES! .. LEG IT!" .. I was mates with one of the dinner lady's sons so I got to go round his house.

My mum was a dinner lady at my Middle School.
 

escargot

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I like food to instead be cooked well and taste like what it is; natural flavours. I'm with Sherlock on this one. I don't want it drowned in spices and powders.
My father would tell us that Indian food was spicy to disguise the fact that the meat was rotten.

When I was old enough to know that a. eating rotten meat would still make people ill and b. some Indian subcontinental cultures are vegetarian so there was no meat to deal with I received Dad's usual reply - a contemptuous 'Don't be stupid!'

Every time I heard that I knew I was right and that he knew too. :chuckle:
 

escargot

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The liver at Primary was very bitter, it used to go on my little sister's plate or down my socks (likewise celery) if she wasn't at my table.
As a kid I was always ravenous so I'd eat everything I was offered except beetroot, which I went off after seeing Barry chuck some up on his desk.

Couldn't understand kids lobbing food in the waste tubs. My plate went back clean and I would've licked it if I could.
 

Swifty

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My father would tell us that Indian food was spicy to disguise the fact that the meat was rotten.

When I was old enough to know that a. eating rotten meat would still make people ill and b. some Indian subcontinental cultures are vegetarian so there was no meat to deal with I received Dad's usual reply - a contemptuous 'Don't be stupid!'

Every time I heard that I knew I was right and that he knew too. :chuckle:
I've never gone as far as thinking spices were being used to disguise off meat, that might have happened sometimes as well but I'm just into more European tasting food because I like more subtle flavours.
 

Tunn11

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I remember the curry had currants in it too. -We certainly didn't have spam fritters (or risotto as far as I can recall) though. 'Rat's buttocks Risotto'- I like the sound of that! I reckon old Rick Stein will be onto it. Cabbage (of course) was always around (particularly the smell), but all said, I think yours must have been a far posher school than mine by the sounds of it.
A South London Grammer in the late sixtes. The "exotic" menu was a reaction to the endless variations on "brown stew". I forgot that the risotto also had cubes of pink in it - absolutely disgusting. I think there was the odd currrant in the curry, probably five or six per vat!
don't recall liver at school, but at home, yes. It was almost as ubiquitous as fish-fingers.
Oh yes, a collection of rubber tiubes held together with something with the texture of very old meat that had been cooked for moths. Served with flaccid white strips with a little pink in them and a rock hard rind laughingly called bacon and swamped in gravy. Fish fingers never, some tasteless white stuff on Fridays even though we weren't Catholic.
Couldn't understand kids lobbing food in the waste tubs. My plate went back clean and I would've licked it if I could.
The fritters could slide there on their own they were that greasy!
 

escargot

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some tasteless white stuff on Fridays even though we weren't Catholic.
Most caterers serve fish on Fridays regardless of religion. Every school I went did this.

Sometimes it was yellow fish (haddock, which I pronounced had-DOCK for some reason) complete with bones and Horrible Sauce.
It was too salty for me but of course I ate it all anyway as between that day's lunch and the next I might only get toast.
 

escargot

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Is that Heinz Horrible Sauce?
Parsley. We didn't have that at home and I found in incomprehensible; warm white stuff with green bits in, all slathered over a spiky bone-fest.

My family's gastronomic standards were such that I thought 'sauce' meant only tomato sauce or Daddy's Sauce.
 

Mythopoeika

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Parsley. We didn't have that at home and I found in incomprehensible; warm white stuff with green bits in, all slathered over a spiky bone-fest.

My family's gastronomic standards were such that I thought 'sauce' meant only tomato sauce or Daddy's Sauce.
I'm not a fan of any white sauce.
 

Tunn11

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Most caterers serve fish on Fridays regardless of religion. Every school I went did this.

Sometimes it was yellow fish (haddock, which I pronounced had-DOCK for some reason) complete with bones a³

nd Horrible Sauce.
It was too salty for me but of course I ate it all anyway as between that day's lunch and the next I might only get toast.
Named fish? I don't think anything other than spam was named, it was always "Brown stew" or "Fish" or "Meat pie".
Fish on Friday was the only concession to dietary requirement.
I remember them running out of stew once so grated cheese was substituted on a plate of cabbage, mash and gravy.
The option to bring a packed lunch came with the instruction to be off school property during the lunch period. Quite a number of us opted for two hours in sleet in the park next door with a cheese sandwich rather than wrestle down the canteen option.
The prefects had a museum of things found in the food which included: insects, bits of metal and a fag end found in the mash!
 

escargot

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Named fish? I don't think anything other than spam was named, it was always "Brown stew" or "Fish" or "Meat pie".
Dunno how I learned it was called had-DOCK. Perhaps I asked because it looked so strange.
I'd seen raw fish in fishmongers' shops, both whole and as fillets, but the only cooked fish I'd eaten were tinned or battered.
As my father objected to the smell of fish cooking it wasn't prepared at home.
 

CarlosTheDJ

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This thread reminds me why I had packed lunches for my entire school career.

Dairylea sandwiches, crisps, a Club biscuit (or similar) and n'apple.

Occasionally my mum would throw a curveball and substitute Dairylea for lemon curd. I loved lemon curd but it's a bit of a surprise if you take the first bite without noticing.
 

Mungoman

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I was introduced to Curries down here in Australia by way of curried sausages.

Rather different eh what.

Then there was the sultanas, apples and bananas that went with it. - or should I say, in it - and it was either Clive of India, or Keenes curry powder.


Most Aussies who fought in the asia-pacific offensives were introduced to curries and brought the idea home when they de-mobbed.

I didn't find it too bad...even though it took the enamel of your teeth.

I've still got both brands in my cupboard
 

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Giant R

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A bit earlier but I remember my dad telling me that when he was serving in the desert although he was in the Royal Navy (long story) they still had normal British food served. He remembered that a 'duff' of some kind was always a favourite. This was a treacle pudding or spotted dick or similar with custard and the custard would come in a big cauldron type pot which would be covered in flies. They developed a technique whereby one of them would scrape the flies aside whilst another would get a big spoonful of the custard beneath for their pud...
 

escargot

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No, and we used to have 'curry' at primary school in the early 80s (before I came to my senses and took a packed lunch instead). I don't remember it causing any problems however, and it must have been very mild.
My second primary school school served us mutton curry in 1968/9. (I can be reasonably precise about the date as I was only there for one year.)

The mutton curry was very mild and I liked it, and when I later read about it in the Sherlock Holmes story I knew what was going on. :wink2:
 

Floyd1

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The option to bring a packed lunch came with the instruction to be off school property during the lunch period. Quite a number of us opted for two hours in sleet in the park next door with a cheese sandwich rather than wrestle down the canteen option.
Can you imagine the uproar if that happened today? You can bring your own lunch but you have to f*** off outside to eat it. Your school wasn't Colditz by any chance?
 

Yithian

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Can you imagine the uproar if that happened today? You can bring your own lunch but you have to f*** off outside to eat it. Your school wasn't Colditz by any chance?

They tended to want to keep people on the premises at Colditz.

Personally, at my old school it was practically impossible to get an exeat for anything barring emergency—until you reached the sixth form at which point nobody could care less where you went and when.
 
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