I Remember It Well....

Giant R

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Those grey Aladdin heaters?

Grandparents had one. A coal fire in the living room, and a solid fuel burner with a back boiler in the kitchen. (it was a kitchen/diner so we spent most of our time there.)

(I still have the corner benchs and table in my crafts room)
Yes, I think they were Aladdin -had forgotten that name! We had to heat the hot water with an immersion heater which you had to turn on half an hour or so before a bath. It was a horrible feeling when you put a little too much cold water in and then the immersion heater had run out of hot water so you couldn't quite get it hot enough.
 

Fluttermoth

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For a few years when I was really young, my parents helped us kids to put out milk and cookie for Santa and to find in the morning the milk glass empty and crumbs where the cookies were.

I knew this was proof that Santa was real.

After reading on the internet, there are many ideas where this tradition came from.

Always feed strangers at the door is one, but my favorite was Odin’s horse Sleipnir always needed food when Odin comes to people’s houses.

In the Netherlands carrots are left for Santa’s horses.

In Argentina hay and water is left for the reindeer.

in Denmark rice pudding is left to keep Santa’s elves out of mischief.
Although our house had already had the open fire blocked up when my parents moved in in the late 60s, there was still an old coal store in the backyard and every year my dad would get some coal dust to leave on Father Christmas's (always Father Christmas in Cornwall in the 70s; Santa was a weird American name) mug of cocoa (my parents weren't big drinkers :rollingw: ) and mince pie plate; it made the whole thing terribly convincing, although we did wonder how the presents stayed so clean (easy; the elves unpack them, of course). We used to leave a carrot for the reindeer as well.
 

escargot

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It was a horrible feeling when you put a little too much cold water in and then the immersion heater had run out of hot water so you couldn't quite get it hot enough.
So it stayed cold then. :chuckle:
 

Swifty

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Has anybody mentioned Green Shield Stamps and their less often collected Co-Op stamps?
I can remember going up to the Green Shield store in Edgware (It was next door to 'Perrys' Ford car dealers) which had a wide frontage, all glazed.
We would collect the little green stamps from when we bought stuff and a little machine at the tills in participating shops would churn out an amount equal to what you deserved for that purchase, or if there wasn't a machine the shopkeeper would just tear a quantity out from a book.
Then we'd lick and stick the stamps into multipage collecting books, and each completed book would be worth a fiver (?) IIRC.
Then take the completed books up to the store and look through the catalogues to see what you wanted, fill out a little slip with a catalogue number, then go to the till and exchange the books of stamps and hand over your little slip of paper, you'd be given a receipt, then go and wait at the counter for the item to be brought out.
Argos took over Green Shield (or were they just renamed?) and continued with the same method of purchasing for many years, but without the need to collect stamps. And much of what they do now is still very similar.
Nurse! .. Grandad's got out of bed again! ..
 

Trevp666

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Nurse! .. Grandad's got out of bed again! ..

Oi! I'll have you know that I resemble that remark!


“(.......) tell them stories that don’t go anywhere like the time I caught the ferry over to Shelbyville.
I needed a new heel for my shoe, so I decided to go to Morganville which is what they called Shelbyville in those days.
So, I tied an onion to my belt which was the style at the time.
Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel.
And in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on ‘em.
‘Give me five bees for a quarter,’ you’d say.
Now, where were we? Oh, yeah! The important thing was that I had an onion on my belt which was the style at the time.
They didn’t have white onions because of the war.
The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones.
You see, back in those days, rich men would ride around in zeppelins, dropping coins on people.
And one day, I seen J. D. Rockefeller flyin’ by– so I run out of the house with a big washtub, and—Anyway, about my washtub. I just used it that morning to wash my turkey which in those days was known as a ‘walking bird.’
We’d always have walking bird on Thanksgiving, with all the trimmings. Cranberries, ‘injun eyes,’ and yams stuffed with gunpowder.
Now, my story begins in 19-dickety-2.
We had to say ‘dickety,’ ‘cause the Kaiser had stolen our word ‘twenty.’
I chased that rascal to get it back but gave up after dickety-six miles…"
etc
 

escargot

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Quoting myself 'ere from the Trainspotting thread, about the smoky air around the railway when I was a kid.

While I love t'old kettles they did mess the place up. Where I live everywhere was black from the smoke and grit right up to the '60s.
In 1976 our Town Hall was sandblasted to remove generations of smoky filth that'd settled on it, probably mostly from the nearby Liverpool/West Coast Scotland line.

The colour of the masonry suddenly changed back from black to lovely pale Cheshire sandstone. We were astounded.
The building had only opened in the early 1900s so was barely seventy years old.

I'm always posting this photo and will again; a 1956 snap of a party in the original Railway School across from the station.

The plain wall you can see top left was painted yellow. The dark lines picking out the bricks, and on all the woodwork, are a layer of coarse dust from the railway smoke. You could blacken the end of your finger by running it along a shelf or wall.

If you rubbed the smear between your fingers it felt gritty. It would then get on your schoolwork and you'd be slapped around by the teacher for making a mess.


We were all breathing that in. :(
1956 Christmas party, Mrs Smith's and Mrs Armitage's classes, Pedley Street School..jpg
 

Floyd1

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Quoting myself 'ere from the Trainspotting thread, about the smoky air around the railway when I was a kid.

While I love t'old kettles they did mess the place up. Where I live everywhere was black from the smoke and grit right up to the '60s.
In 1976 our Town Hall was sandblasted to remove generations of smoky filth that'd settled on it, probably mostly from the nearby Liverpool/West Coast Scotland line.

The colour of the masonry suddenly changed back from black to lovely pale Cheshire sandstone. We were astounded.
The building had only opened in the early 1900s so was barely seventy years old.

I'm always posting this photo and will again; a 1956 snap of a party in the original Railway School across from the station.

The plain wall you can see top left was painted yellow. The dark lines picking out the bricks, and on all the woodwork, are a layer of coarse dust from the railway smoke. You could blacken the end of your finger by running it along a shelf or wall.

If you rubbed the smear between your fingers it felt gritty. It would then get on your schoolwork and you'd be slapped around by the teacher for making a mess.


We were all breathing that in. :(
View attachment 49338
Is the wall that was painted to resemble houses (to fool the pesky Germans in WW2) still there?
 

Floyd1

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I remember that you couldn't (or weren't supposed to) drink from the cold tap in the bathroom as it was often tank fed, not mains. A lot of the tanks in the loft had badly fitting lids, or none at all, so heaven knows what fell in.
 

escargot

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Is the wall that was painted to resemble houses (to fool the pesky Germans in WW2) still there?
Latest thinking about the Wall is that it was a scam to convince essential engineering workers they'd be safe during German bombing raids. :omg:

Nope, the Wall was demolished a couple of years ago.

There are mournful YouTube videos about this scandalous desecration of the town's heritage.


These days West Street sees more sunshine where it had very little and there are nice little houses on the previously hidden derelict site.
 

Giant R

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I remember that you couldn't (or weren't supposed to) drink from the cold tap in the bathroom as it was often tank fed, not mains. A lot of the tanks in the loft had badly fitting lids, or none at all, so heaven knows what fell in.
Yes, I have fished pigeons, mice and all sorts out of water tanks. Also many tanks were (and still are in many cases) asbestos so best not to drink tank fed water really :) . I remember once being called out to find out why the cold taps in the bathroom weren't working. I went into the loft and reached in the tank to the feed at the bottom and found something stuck in the outlet. The lagging was fibreglass and there was a fair bit floating about so I assumed it was a piece of this. I sat in my van to have a sandwich and to wait a bit make sure it hadn't airlocked. After lunch I went back up to tidy up the lagging and fit the lid and thought I would take a look at what had blocked it - there was half a decaying mouse laying there - and I don't think I actually washed my hands before eating my sandwich:omg:
 

Trevp666

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I remember 'That's Life'.
Esther Rantzen (of course) with a couple of side-kicks doing stories about rip-off companies and dodgy salesmen etc, along with 'consumer news' which were usually things about stuff like sweets flavoured with nettle, or banana toothpaste etc, going out into the street to 'test' them on idiots members of the public.
Then a funny story about someones baggy knickers being stolen from their washing line only to find a local moggy had nicked them to make a bed for new kittens (story full of cheap puns of course).
A song by Richard Stilgoe which was full of euphemisms, or cross-eyed Cyril Velvetjacket delivering an odd monologue about swimming pools, or some such inane/banal thing.
And at the end an 'and finally' about somebody who found a carrot shaped like a man with his legs crossed, or buying a bag of crisps that only had one giant crisp in the bag.
 

Bigphoot2

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Oi! I'll have you know that I resemble that remark!


“(.......) tell them stories that don’t go anywhere like the time I caught the ferry over to Shelbyville.
I needed a new heel for my shoe, so I decided to go to Morganville which is what they called Shelbyville in those days.
So, I tied an onion to my belt which was the style at the time.
Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel.
And in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on ‘em.
‘Give me five bees for a quarter,’ you’d say.
Now, where were we? Oh, yeah! The important thing was that I had an onion on my belt which was the style at the time.
They didn’t have white onions because of the war.
The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones.
You see, back in those days, rich men would ride around in zeppelins, dropping coins on people.
And one day, I seen J. D. Rockefeller flyin’ by– so I run out of the house with a big washtub, and—Anyway, about my washtub. I just used it that morning to wash my turkey which in those days was known as a ‘walking bird.’
We’d always have walking bird on Thanksgiving, with all the trimmings. Cranberries, ‘injun eyes,’ and yams stuffed with gunpowder.
Now, my story begins in 19-dickety-2.
We had to say ‘dickety,’ ‘cause the Kaiser had stolen our word ‘twenty.’
I chased that rascal to get it back but gave up after dickety-six miles…"
etc
My sister-in-law's dad always reminded me of Grandpa Simpson. As my nephew said, "He can tell really long stories that are just all middle, no beginning, no end, just one long middle."
 

Floyd1

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Oi! I'll have you know that I resemble that remark!


“(.......) tell them stories that don’t go anywhere like the time I caught the ferry over to Shelbyville.
I needed a new heel for my shoe, so I decided to go to Morganville which is what they called Shelbyville in those days.
So, I tied an onion to my belt which was the style at the time.
Now, to take the ferry cost a nickel.
And in those days, nickels had pictures of bumblebees on ‘em.
‘Give me five bees for a quarter,’ you’d say.
Now, where were we? Oh, yeah! The important thing was that I had an onion on my belt which was the style at the time.
They didn’t have white onions because of the war.
The only thing you could get was those big yellow ones.
You see, back in those days, rich men would ride around in zeppelins, dropping coins on people.
And one day, I seen J. D. Rockefeller flyin’ by– so I run out of the house with a big washtub, and—Anyway, about my washtub. I just used it that morning to wash my turkey which in those days was known as a ‘walking bird.’
We’d always have walking bird on Thanksgiving, with all the trimmings. Cranberries, ‘injun eyes,’ and yams stuffed with gunpowder.
Now, my story begins in 19-dickety-2.
We had to say ‘dickety,’ ‘cause the Kaiser had stolen our word ‘twenty.’
I chased that rascal to get it back but gave up after dickety-six miles…"
etc
This reminds me of my years- 18 to late 20s. My mate and I would go to pubs, (in small villages in the peak district) and inevitably we'd meet this character. A bit older than us who we knew- salt of the earth type- but,smallness man the stories went on for hours. It would usually start with "saw your mate today". Me and my buddy wouldn't have a clue who he was on about, and it would evolve into a very convoluted tale that we couldn't for the life of us remember how the whole thing started. We had names for each of his monologues (I say that as WE rarely spoke in the 2 or 3 hours it took him to tell his deranged babblings), but I do recall that one of his best was one that involved a cheese sandwich at some point.
 

charliebrown

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This could be a regional thing, but in the late 1950s the government tried to help the struggling dairy industry and buy their excess milk.

The government had the brilliant idea of turning all that milk in butter, cheese, and drinking milk for schools.

So, if you bought lunch at school, all cooked vegetables were floating in butter.

It seems sliced cheese topped everything, and you got milk to drink whether you wanted it or not.

The part I loved is that you got ice cream in cups.
 

Iris

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We had the milk at school too and sometimes there were spare bottles that were given out.
I enjoyed it.
 

EnolaGaia

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At the time the US Department of Agriculture had farm support programs that helped farmers build up their production capabilities in return for selling large amounts of their produce to the government at discount prices. The dairy support programs were part of that campaign. When I started school in 1957 we had plenty of milk available at the school. We had a 'milk period' in the morning, where students could choose to purchase a carton of milk for a few cents and take a break in the school cafeteria to drink it.

Milk was the only drink served in the cafeteria for lunch, and ice cream treats were available during lunchtime at discount prices. It was not until my last year of secondary school that the cafeteria in the new high school offered anything other than milk or water as a drink.

There was also a lot of 'government surplus' vegetables and staples used in the school cafeterias. Our lunches were full meals with an entree, bread, a 'salad' item (broadly defined), and at least two cooked vegetables - often, but not always, supplemented with a dessert item.

I've often remarked in the decades since that we ate like kings at my elementary school. This general format was typical throughout our county school system.
 

Floyd1

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Yes, I have fished pigeons, mice and all sorts out of water tanks. Also many tanks were (and still are in many cases) asbestos so best not to drink tank fed water really :) . I remember once being called out to find out why the cold taps in the bathroom weren't working. I went into the loft and reached in the tank to the feed at the bottom and found something stuck in the outlet. The lagging was fibreglass and there was a fair bit floating about so I assumed it was a piece of this. I sat in my van to have a sandwich and to wait a bit make sure it hadn't airlocked. After lunch I went back up to tidy up the lagging and fit the lid and thought I would take a look at what had blocked it - there was half a decaying mouse laying there - and I don't think I actually washed my hands before eating my sandwich:omg:
Ha!
I wonder why they didn't just run the cold main up from the kitchen to the bathroom back then? It would have been easy, (the bathroom is usually above the kitchen) and cheaper than putting tanks in lofts which are then exposed to cold temperatures in winter and can even freeze in older houses. (Not to mention mice/pigeons/fibreglass etc falling in).
 

Giant R

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Ha!
I wonder why they didn't just run the cold main up from the kitchen to the bathroom back then? It would have been easy, (the bathroom is usually above the kitchen) and cheaper than putting tanks in lofts which are then exposed to cold temperatures in winter and can even freeze in older houses. (Not to mention mice/pigeons/fibreglass etc falling in).
The problem with that is a mismatch of pressure between hot and cold taps. If you have hot and cold from the tanks in a normal 2 storey house the pressure is only about 0.2 or 0.3 bar but a cold main can be anything from 1-10 bar, although its normally under 5 bar but still a big difference. It would cause a big problem with showers for instance, trying to balance the temp and if you were showering and someone ran the main tap somewhere else you could get a slug of very hot water suddenly on your head (or worse!) In the past 20 years or so unvented hot water cylinders and combi boilers have become far more popular, doing away with tanks completely. These aren't the complete answer though as the mains pressure has gradually reduced, certainly in my area and the minimum pressure that water companies used to guarantee has been reduced also. I think it may be that, with older water pipes in the roads, the pressure is reduced to cut down on leaks.
 

Floyd1

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The problem with that is a mismatch of pressure between hot and cold taps. If you have hot and cold from the tanks in a normal 2 storey house the pressure is only about 0.2 or 0.3 bar but a cold main can be anything from 1-10 bar, although its normally under 5 bar but still a big difference. It would cause a big problem with showers for instance, trying to balance the temp and if you were showering and someone ran the main tap somewhere else you could get a slug of very hot water suddenly on your head (or worse!) In the past 20 years or so unvented hot water cylinders and combi boilers have become far more popular, doing away with tanks completely. These aren't the complete answer though as the mains pressure has gradually reduced, certainly in my area and the minimum pressure that water companies used to guarantee has been reduced also. I think it may be that, with older water pipes in the roads, the pressure is reduced to cut down on leaks.
Ah yes, I see. I wasn't considering the pressure of the hot tap as well.
 

Dinobot

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Childhood summers seemed to always contain chops (burnt), Brussels sprouts and mashed potato - served with yet another repeat of M*A*S*H.
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
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Childhood holidays in the Isle of Wight.
(mostly between the ages of about 8 - 12 although there are pictures of me there from much earlier years - I was born in '66)
IIRC we went to the Isle of Wight pretty much every year, and always stayed in the same hotel, The Sandringham in Sandown.
And also IIRC there were years in which my grandparents on my mothers side also came, and also years in which my Aunt and Uncle and 2 cousins also came.

Getting the ferry across from Southampton felt like we were going to another country.

We would visit Browns golf course, which was situated in a park nearby, just along the front there, and there was a quite memorable 'Tea Shop' in the middle of the golf course which did some rather fine cream cakes and ice creams.
There was also a large paddling pool for us kiddiwinks there too.

The hotel was right on the beach (except for a road) and just there in front of the hotel, on the beach, was a row of trampolines.
(I remember being told that that beach would be gone within 20 years because of erosion or some such bummocks - it's still there)
One year when we were on the beach one day, a nice warm, calm, summers day, we experienced some kind of minor tsunami when a single large(ish) wave moved up the beach, slowly gathering up peoples towels and sunbreaks and other possessions, causing everyone to jump up surprised and grab hold of small children etc. It made a bit of a mess but nobody died.

And we always used to visit Blackgang Chine, which had some fibreglass dinosaurs, and a 'wild west' town, and (i think) some kind of big blue pool.

Also we always visited 'Alum Bay' which was by 'The Needles'. We would go in a cable car type of ride (open seats) which went down to the beach. This is the place which is famous for it's coloured sands.

The photos of me when I was really young are mainly pics of me in 'fancy dress' cos the hotel used to do games and contests etc, like a holiday camp would.
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
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I think we need to see this :)
Hang on I'll have a rummage around and see if I can find any.

Aha!

I'm in the union flag and my brother (5 years older) is 'Nero'.
1639933258521.png


I think I'm a Roman gladiator in this one and my brother is Davy Crockett.
1639933370449.png


Something to do with the advert at the time for 'Sandemans Port'.
1639933424660.png


Well at least they made an effort, lol.
I have a feeling my parents were probably 'sloshed' a lot of the time.
 

ChasFink

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Lately I've been thinking of this tune from a safety PSA that ran all the time when I was a kid.


Written by the great Vic Mizzy, who did the music for The Addams Family, Green Acres, etc. and sung by his daughter. I was fascinated by her accent, especially the way she said "corner". They Might Be Giants did a faithful cover years later.
 

Dinobot

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Childhood holidays in the Isle of Wight.

The photos of me when I was really young are mainly pics of me in 'fancy dress' cos the hotel used to do games and contests etc, like a holiday camp would.
I think we need to see this :)
Hang on I'll have a rummage around and see if I can find any.

Aha!

I'm in the union flag and my brother (5 years older) is 'Nero'.
View attachment 49509

I think I'm a Roman gladiator in this one and my brother is Davy Crockett.
View attachment 49510

Something to do with the advert at the time for 'Sandemans Port'.
View attachment 49511

Well at least they made an effort, lol.
I have a feeling my parents were probably 'sloshed' a lot of the time.
I was thinking your pics would be more along these lines...

3fa1547073c1109d1c96ec246042ec66.jpg
unnamed-8.jpg
 

escargot

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Lately I've been thinking of this tune from a safety PSA that ran all the time when I was a kid.


Written by the great Vic Mizzy, who did the music for The Addams Family, Green Acres, etc. and sung by his daughter. I was fascinated by her accent, especially the way she said "corner". They Might Be Giants did a faithful cover years later.
In the catchy style of In the Middle of the House and later the Muppet Show theme. :)
 

Trevp666

It was like that when I got here.........honest!!!
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