Interesting Eye Witness Account Of Mongolian Neanderthal

oldrover

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#2
I think it's pretty unlikely. He'd be into his late nineties at least by now.
 

Dunbaraj

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#3
Wow. That's actually an incredible story. Guy escapes prison camp, encounters wild man out in the bush. Movie anyone?
 

stu neville

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#4
It's very reminiscent of Slavomir Rawicz's story, which has since been debunked somewhat. However, it seems that more than one escapee has related similar encounters.

The Rawicz thread is here.
 

gerhard1

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#6
Rupert Furneaux goes into it a bit in his 1961 book The World's Strangest Mysteries. As I recall, it was a couple of paragraphs at most in a chapter on the yeti. As I recall, a small group of Poles held prisoner by the Soviets escaped from a labor camp in Siberia, and went south to India by way of the Himalayas, and reported a few encounters with the creatures.
 

lordmongrove

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#7
The creature the man describes is known as the almasty or almas. Once thought to be a relic Neanderthal it now seems more likely that of it exists it may be an early offshoot of Homo erectus.
 

gerhard1

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#8
The creature the man describes is known as the almasty or almas. Once thought to be a relic Neanderthal it now seems more likely that of it exists it may be an early offshoot of Homo erectus.
Except for their locations, is there a real difference between Alma, yeti, Yowie and Bigfoot/Sasquatch? Their descriptions are really pretty similar.
 

oldrover

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#9
Except for their locations, is there a real difference between Alma, yeti, Yowie and Bigfoot/Sasquatch? Their descriptions are really pretty similar.
Yes, there's quite a difference, between the Almasty and the rest anyway. As for the Yowie, it's reported from an area where it can't possibly exist if it were an Eutherian and in anyway related to the other animals, if they were real, so that'd have to be completely different too.

Also, the ones we think of as being solid like the yeti, has changed over the years, and is to a large extent portrayed very differently in various parts of its range, and very differently here. Same is true of the Almasty.
 

amyasleigh

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#10
It's very reminiscent of Slavomir Rawicz's story, which has since been debunked somewhat. However, it seems that more than one escapee has related similar encounters.

The Rawicz thread is here.
They've made a film of it already. http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1023114/

No yeti in it though.

There has always, I gather, been a lot of doubt about the veracity of Rawicz’s story in The Long Walk – ever since its publication in the 1950s; with an increasing amount of increasingly convincing debunking, over the decades since – though it’s reckoned within the bounds of possibility that somebody may truly have accomplished this feat or one much like it (as told of in the above quoted post, and the Rawicz thread linked-to therein).

The original book was co-written by Slawomir Rawicz and the British journalist Ronald Downing – it is suspected that Downing in fact performed the function of “ghost-writer” for the book. An interesting suggestion has been floated, that re the yeti-encounter element, there was something of a case of “the tail wagging the dog”: Downing, prompted to follow up yeti material in response to the widespread fascination in Britain in the ‘fifties, with the putative Himalayan creature, was contacted by Rawicz initially over the Pole’s supposed encounter with a yeti twosome during his supposed odyssey. It was subsequent to that, that Rawicz told Downing his full Siberia-to-India tale – whence the idea of the book and seeking publication.

Downing’s role as above, and other matters, discussed in a piece on Cryptomundo by Loren Coleman in 2010. Attempting a link:

cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo-news/long-walk/

I’m not very “handy” with links: if it doesn’t work, I suggest logging onto Cryptomundo and using the search function, keyword “yetis”: should lead quite easily to the Coleman piece, dated Dec. 15th 2010 and titled “The Way Back: Will Yetis Be Scene Stealers?” This in reference to the film, as re quote above (film then shortly to be released) -- and as oldrover mentions there, the yeti episode was in fact not included in the film.
 

lordmongrove

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#11
Except for their locations, is there a real difference between Alma, yeti, Yowie and Bigfoot/Sasquatch? Their descriptions are really pretty similar.
The almasty is more human like but still clearly not Homo sapien. The yeti is a term that seems to include three separate ape-like creatures, a small one about as big as the Sumatran orang-pendek, a man sized one that moves both on two and four legs and resembles an orang-utan and a giant 8-10 foot, dark haired one with a gorilla-like face.
 

oldrover

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blessmycottonsocks

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#15
No, they really don't. This Zana and Khwit story really needs to die in terms of cryptozoology. Sykes needs to leave it alone too.
The account I read was by Loren Coleman, quoting some input from a Russian geneticist called Bourtsev. He described the skulls as having anachronistic australoid features, which would seem to be somewhat anomalous given their date and location.
 
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lordmongrove

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#17
No, they really don't. This Zana and Khwit story really needs to die in terms of cryptozoology. Sykes needs to leave it alone too.
The supposed Zana skull may not even be her, it was only found in the general area. We know Kwit's skull is kosha because it was from a marked grave. Sykes says he's found some mDNA from Kwit's teeth and some of his living relations that he recons is sub- Saharan African, from West Africa and probably pre-Homo sapien.
 

oldrover

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#18
The account I read was by Loren Coleman, quoting some input from a Russian geneticist called Bourtsev. He described the skulls as having anachronistic australoid features, which would seem to be somewhat anomalous given their date and location.
Have you come across Burtsev before? He's quite an individual. I particularly recommend his Almasty impression. There's a lot out there about him. I wouldn't take too much notice of what he says personally, but as I say, there's plenty on him out there.
 

blessmycottonsocks

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#19
Have you come across Burtsev before? He's quite an individual. I particularly recommend his Almasty impression. There's a lot out there about him. I wouldn't take too much notice of what he says personally, but as I say, there's plenty on him out there.
No I hadn't. I thought Loren Coleman had a reasonably respectable reputation in cryptozooligal circles though. Do you believe he's been taken in by a hoax in this case?
 

oldrover

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#20
The supposed Zana skull may not even be her, it was only found in the general area. We know Kwit's skull is kosha because it was from a marked grave. Sykes says he's found some mDNA from Kwit's teeth and some of his living relations that he recons is sub- Saharan African, from West Africa and probably pre-Homo sapien.
I hate to say this, but it's Bryan Sykes, let's be fair he isn't always exactly on the money. He cocked up the DNA on the Himalayan samples, and there's the Mr L Prosser business, plus his pretending to affiliated to an institution, Sykes credibility is not high.
 

oldrover

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#21
No I hadn't. I thought Loren Coleman had a reasonably respectable reputation in cryptozooligal circles though. Do you believe he's been taken in by a hoax in this case?
I certainly know of Lauren Coleman, but I wasn't aware he had a particularly good reputation, maybe I'm wrong, but personally Cryptomundo is never a site that I visit. That said, I got the strong impression that he wasn't impressed by the what he was reporting. He says

I have more to say about the Is It Real? morphological examination of the Khwit skull, and how they used the wrong skulls for comparison, some other time.

http://cryptomundo.com/cryptozoo-news/khwit-dna/

So I took it that he was pretty dismissive of the idea.
 

bob61

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#24
Wow. That's actually an incredible story. Guy escapes prison camp, encounters wild man out in the bush. Movie anyone?
i'd watch it , pop some popcorn , turn the lights out , get something to drink & make it a night ( movie night ) .
 
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