Invasive Species

Naughty_Felid

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Did a search of the Message board, and did not find a thread specifically devoted to Bat infestations. I am always optimistic that the professional pest control people at my condominum have gotten the problem solved; I'll go a few days with no bats inside my residence and think they are finally sealed out by a netting which lets them get out but not back in. Well, last week, Thursday Morning, I woke up at 4 AM, to find one in the kitchen sink, covered it up and waited for the pro pest control guy to take it for rabies testing as required by government rules and reg. Thought I wouldn't see any more bats but Sunday night, found one in the toilet bowl. So far, no more inside my place. One Bat Enthusiast said he slept with bats in his bedroom, and it didn't bother him.

I love bats, an endangered, protected by law species, but . . .
I've slept with an old bat in the bedroom for years...
 

ramonmercado

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I don't like the sound of this one.

Scientists forecast where is the highly invasive fall armyworm to strike next
Staple and economically important crops throughout the world could be at serious risk if efficient measures are not taken soon

Date: January 9, 2019
Source: Pensoft Publishers
Summary: Known to be feeding on many economically important crops, including maize, sugarcane, beet, tomato, potato and cotton, the larvae of the native to the Americas fall armyworm moth already seem to present a huge threat to the world's yield. Moreover, it only took 2 years for the pest to establish throughout sub-Saharan Africa. A study looks into the factors and likelihood for it to spread to other regions and continents.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2019/01/190109090927.htm
 

ramonmercado

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The coypu has arrived in Dublin.

Waterways Ireland has warned the public to be on the alert for a very “large invasive rodent” species which has been spotted along the Royal Canal in Dublin.

Sightings of coypu, a semi-aquatic creature with bright orange teeth, a long cylindrical tail, and webbed back feet have been reported near the Ashtown area of the canal close to Castleknock. The rodents, which can be up to a metre long and weigh up to 9kg, carry a number of diseases harmful to humans and domestic animals. Waterways Ireland has issued an “invasive species alert” and warned the public “not to engage” the animals or make any attempt to trap them but to report any sightings, with photographs where possible. ...

The “invasive alien species” originates from wetlands in South America, and is thought to have arrived in Ireland about five years ago. It is believed the animal was introduced as a novelty attraction to a pet farm in Cork but some escaped in 2014 and began breeding on the outskirts of Cork city. In 2016, 10 coypu were shot on the Curraheen river on the outskirts of the city. ...

https://www.irishtimes.com/news/env...-spotted-along-dublin-s-royal-canal-1.3834367
 

Saucerian

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There was at least one more episode of a bat getting into my residenence, this one at about 3 AM. Spent 15 mins of so chasing it with a 10 foot pole, and, with all the windows open, it finally found a way out. That was the last time, I'm glad to say, and the work of the professionls, putting in netting that lets the bats get out but not back in, to the ceiling vents, has really solved the problem.
 

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The Grimsby Gamera
https://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/...FTMmzmCZbcvvqgfscgufEYzAGA4Nj6UX6_hN3TKjTaVlE

A giant North American reptile has been discovered by a four-year-old boy at a North Lincolnshire lake.

Mystery had surrounded why a number of tench at the Mesters lake, near Messingham, had been found mutilated or brutally killed in recent years - some with their tails missing and some with just their heads.


Nobody had a clue what or who was behind this, until four-year-old Connor Brocklesby recently discovered the truth.
 

Jim

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The Grimsby Gamera
https://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/...FTMmzmCZbcvvqgfscgufEYzAGA4Nj6UX6_hN3TKjTaVlE

A giant North American reptile has been discovered by a four-year-old boy at a North Lincolnshire lake.

Mystery had surrounded why a number of tench at the Mesters lake, near Messingham, had been found mutilated or brutally killed in recent years - some with their tails missing and some with just their heads.


Nobody had a clue what or who was behind this, until four-year-old Connor Brocklesby recently discovered the truth.
There're actually common in the Northeast US. They can approach 30 pounds and easily take off a finger.
When young we keep a small one in a large pail for a few. Us naught boys would throw in a dozen large crayfish. What a fight the snapper wouldn't quit until all the crayfish were dead (and they fight back). Remember we were only ~ 10 so this was quite exciting (certainly wouldn't repeat this now).
 

ramonmercado

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Everyone is tocking about this tick.

LAST SUMMER, IN a town just outside New York City, a tick bit a man.

This ought to sound unexceptional. Ticks are normal on the upper East Coast; after all, tick-transmitted Lyme diseasewas first identified next door, in Connecticut. But the tick that covertly slid its pointy barbed mouthparts into an unlucky 66-year-old Yonkers resident was something new. It was the first invasive tick to arrive in the United States in 50 years, and this was the first time it had bitten a human.

That bite didn’t make its victim sick. But that it occurred at all is causing scientists to realize how little they know about the insect involved, known as the Asian longhorned tick: what diseases it transmits, where it prefers to live, and how it manages to move across long distances. Behind those unanswered questions looms a larger problem: We haven’t paid as much attention to ticks as we have to other insects that carry diseases. We have a long way to go to catch up—just as changes in weather patterns have ticks on the move too.

https://www.wired.com/story/the-terrifying-unknowns-of-the-asian-longhorned-tick/
 
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Jim

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Everyone is tocking about this tick.

LAST SUMMER, IN a town just outside New York City, a tick bit a man.

This ought to sound unexceptional. Ticks are normal on the upper East Coast; after all, tick-transmitted Lyme diseasewas first identified next door, in Connecticut. But the tick that covertly slid its pointy barbed mouthparts into an unlucky 66-year-old Yonkers resident was something new. It was the first invasive tick to arrive in the United States in 50 years, and this was the first time it had bitten a human.

That bite didn’t make its victim sick. But that it occurred at all is causing scientists to realize how little they know about the insect involved, known as the Asian longhorned tick: what diseases it transmits, where it prefers to live, and how it manages to move across long distances. Behind those unanswered questions looms a larger problem: We haven’t paid as much attention to ticks as we have to other insects that carry diseases. We have a long way to go to catch up—just as changes in weather patterns have ticks on the move too.

https://www.wired.com/story/the-terrifying-unknowns-of-the-asian-longhorned-tick/
W have 3 species of ticks: the deer tick, the American dog tick and the lone star tick here in NYS. Only the deer ticks can carry the bacterium that results in Lyme disease. Never known an animal or person to get the disease but plenty of animals and people who venture in the fields or tall grasses get bit. They are very nasty little buggers once they poke their nasty head into you or your pet..
 
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maximus otter

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Never known an animal or person to get [Lyme] disease but plenty of...people who venture in the fields or tall grasses get bit.
In the UK about 2,000-3,000 people contract Lyme disease each year. lt’s something to be very careful about, as the symptoms can be debilitating and last for years.

Especially in the Southeast and the Scottish Highlands, check yourself/each other for ticks after visiting the countryside, and invest in a proper tick removal device. (l recommend the O/Tom tick twister, available for £2.99 from Amazon).

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/lyme-disease/

maximus otter
 

Jim

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In the UK about 2,000-3,000 people contract Lyme disease each year. lt’s something to be very careful about, as the symptoms can be debilitating and last for years.

Especially in the Southeast and the Scottish Highlands, check yourself/each other for ticks after visiting the countryside, and invest in a proper tick removal device. (l recommend the O/Tom tick twister, available for £2.99 from Amazon).

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/lyme-disease/

maximus otter
We just touch the ticks with a blown-out tip of a match. Dad showed me this as a kid. They let go immediately taking their nasty mouth parts along with them. Not sure what happens if you let them go undetected (their very easy to spot, you'd have to be unconscious to not know when there on Y, however tougher to tell with my dog).
Over here Lyme disease is spread mainly by deer ticks residing on whitetail deer. The NYS "Department of Environment and Conversation" attempts to keep this in check and provides warnings on TV.
 

Jim

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The Grimsby Gamera
https://www.grimsbytelegraph.co.uk/...FTMmzmCZbcvvqgfscgufEYzAGA4Nj6UX6_hN3TKjTaVlE

A giant North American reptile has been discovered by a four-year-old boy at a North Lincolnshire lake.

Mystery had surrounded why a number of tench at the Mesters lake, near Messingham, had been found mutilated or brutally killed in recent years - some with their tails missing and some with just their heads.


Nobody had a clue what or who was behind this, until four-year-old Connor Brocklesby recently discovered the truth.
That's an exceptional speciment (75 pounds) for a common snapper. Very common turtle over here. One about 8 - 10 pounds washed up on the neighbors lawn last week after heavy rain. Personally never seen one over ~ 30 pounds which is considered a giant in the northeast.
 

lordmongrove

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That's an exceptional speciment (75 pounds) for a common snapper. Very common turtle over here. One about 8 - 10 pounds washed up on the neighbors lawn last week after heavy rain. Personally never seen one over ~ 30 pounds which is considered a giant in the northeast.
Maybe its an alligator snapper.
 

Jim

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Maybe its an alligator snapper.
The turtle shown has the shell type more typical of the common snapper. Those nasties things aproach 150 pounds (alligator snappers). The common snapper is one of the meanest - most_agressive animals I've encoutered.
When young a large snapper (25 to 30+) pounds slipped into a boat overnight to steal a fishermans bait. However it couldn't get out. Come morning the guys went to fish and found the turtle very angry and snapping at anything that moved. A man eventually grapped it by the tail while another another distacted it's head by getting it to bite a section of 2 by 4.
 

Cochise

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In the UK about 2,000-3,000 people contract Lyme disease each year. lt’s something to be very careful about, as the symptoms can be debilitating and last for years.

Especially in the Southeast and the Scottish Highlands, check yourself/each other for ticks after visiting the countryside, and invest in a proper tick removal device. (l recommend the O/Tom tick twister, available for £2.99 from Amazon).

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/lyme-disease/

maximus otter
I thought Lyme Disease was named for Lyme in Connecticut. So you'd expect there to be US cases.

Oh - there are US cases - about 300,000 a year!

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lyme_disease#Society_and_culture
 

lordmongrove

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The turtle shown has the shell type more typical of the common snapper. Those nasties things aproach 150 pounds (alligator snappers). The common snapper is one of the meanest - most_agressive animals I've encoutered.
When young a large snapper (25 to 30+) pounds slipped into a boat overnight to steal a fishermans bait. However it couldn't get out. Come morning the guys went to fish and found the turtle very angry and snapping at anything that moved. A man eventually grapped it by the tail while another another distacted it's head by getting it to bite a section of 2 by 4.
I've kept both, nasty bugger and soft shelled turtles are bad tempered, agressive thigs as well.
 
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Jim

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INT21

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Lyme disease is no joke.

A couple of month back one of my daughter complained about a rash that was spreading on her leg. and she was feeling tired all the time.

W took her to A&E, and they were not sure what it was. shortly afterward she was feeling very ill. A doctor said it was Lyme Disease. She had probably picked it up from a tick that had attached itself to her leg as she was walking in the fields.

She will be on medication for about six months. But is feeling much better.

Nasty little critters, ticks.

INT21.
 

ramonmercado

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Lyme disease is no joke.

A couple of month back one of my daughter complained about a rash that was spreading on her leg. and she was feeling tired all the time.

W took her to A&E, and they were not sure what it was. shortly afterward she was feeling very ill. A doctor said it was Lyme Disease. She had probably picked it up from a tick that had attached itself to her leg as she was walking in the fields.

She will be on medication for about six months. But is feeling much better.

Nasty little critters, ticks.

INT21.
Terrible. At least it can be treated.
 

hunck

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Florida residents urged to kill iguanas ‘whenever possible’



Non-native iguanas are multiplying so rapidly in south Florida that a state wildlife agency is now encouraging people to kill them.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said people should exterminate the lizards on their properties as well as on 22 areas of public land. It did not say how civilians should try to kill them.

Iguanas are native to Central America, tropical parts of South America and some Caribbean islands. They were brought to Florida as pets or inadvertently on ships and have begun to flourish in the state, where the warm climate is perfect for them.

“Homeowners do not need a permit to kill iguanas on their own property, and the FWC encourages homeowners to kill green iguanas on their own property whenever possible,” the agency said.

Iguanas are not dangerous or aggressive to humans but they can dig lengthy tunnels, damaging pavements and building foundations. They can sometimes carry salmonella bacteria.

“Some green iguanas cause damage to infrastructure by digging burrows that erode and collapse sidewalks, foundations, seawalls, berms and canal banks,” the wildlife commission said. “Green iguanas may also leave droppings on docks, moored boats, seawalls, porches, decks, pool platforms and inside swimming pools.”

Another invasive species, the Burmese python, is wreaking havoc in the Everglades as they eat almost anything and have no natural predators in the US, except for the occasional alligator.
 
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INT21

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Also very big pythons are on the hit list. People are making a living as python bounty hunters.

Wonder what they taste like ?

INT21.
 

LordRsmacker

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We just touch the ticks with a blown-out tip of a match. Dad showed me this as a kid. They let go immediately taking their nasty mouth parts along with them. Not sure what happens if you let them go undetected (their very easy to spot, you'd have to be unconscious to not know when there on Y, however tougher to tell with my dog).
Over here Lyme disease is spread mainly by deer ticks residing on whitetail deer. The NYS "Department of Environment and Conversation" attempts to keep this in check and provides warnings on TV.
That's the worst thing you can do to remove a tick. Yes, it will let go, but it also vomits the now-infected blood it has drunk back into you.

Here's some interesting stuff about ticks:

https://www.outsideonline.com/1915071/rise-tick
 

Jim

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That's the worst thing you can do to remove a tick. Yes, it will let go, but it also vomits the now-infected blood it has drunk back into you.

Here's some interesting stuff about ticks:

https://www.outsideonline.com/1915071/rise-tick
No Lymes disease in NYS in the 60's - 70's when we got bit. No kits or? back then. BTW technique works on leeches as well. The vet removes them from our dog chemically that was more recently.
 

LordRsmacker

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No Lymes disease in NYS in the 60's - 70's when we got bit. No kits or? back then. BTW technique works on leeches as well. The vet removes them from our dog chemically that was more recently.
The fact that there was no Lyme Disease in NYS back in the 60s and 70s was probably less down to the way you removed ticks, and more down to the fact the disease was yet to be identified - it was discovered in Lyme, Connecticut thanks to a small cluster of infections, in the late 70's/early 80's. Nowadays, infected ticks are spread far and wide.

If you remove a tick carefully, within 24 hours of it starting to feed, the chances are you won't get Lyme Disease, because of the way it travels through the tick into the host upon which it is feeding. Making it spew into you by burning its backside is only going to speed up that infection progress.

Hey, but what do I know? I'm just passing on the advice given by trained healthcare professionals. You know best, so you carry on, old son!
 

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The fact that there was no Lyme Disease in NYS back in the 60s and 70s was probably less down to the way you removed ticks, and more down to the fact the disease was yet to be identified - it was discovered in Lyme, Connecticut thanks to a small cluster of infections, in the late 70's/early 80's. Nowadays, infected ticks are spread far and wide.

If you remove a tick carefully, within 24 hours of it starting to feed, the chances are you won't get Lyme Disease, because of the way it travels through the tick into the host upon which it is feeding. Making it spew into you by burning its backside is only going to speed up that infection progress.

Hey, but what do I know? I'm just passing on the advice given by trained healthcare professionals. You know best, so you carry on, old son!
It slowly moved it's way up north mainly via out antlered friends. 1st cases were reported up north some 20 years odd years ago. Agreed with modern removal techniques the vet uses a chemical method to remove them from our dog. Progress marches on, good info.
 

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Wandering wasp arrives in Warwickshire.

The first sighting of a species of wasp usually found in Southern Europe is believed to have been made on mainland Britain.

Sabina George, 79, spotted the Polistes Nimpha paper wasp at Compton Verney Art Gallery, in Warwickshire, and said she knew it was "something different". Steven Falk, an expert in pollinators, confirmed it was the insect, which is also found in west Asia. He said it may have been brought over accidentally on a plant or in a lorry.Mrs George visited the gallery on 21 September to view an exhibition when she spotted the wasp among the shrubbery.

"I knew it was a wasp, but I knew from the face something was different," said Mrs George, a keen amateur photographer from Kenilworth.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-coventry-warwickshire-49878547
 
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