Iron Age Discoveries & Heritage

ramonmercado

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Pretty savage massacre.

Attacked from behind and at times dismembered, the fallen residents of an ancient Iberian village add to evidence that prehistoric Europe was a violent place.

Violence in ancient Europe isn’t unheard of, with some unearthed massacres attributed to power struggles after the fall of the Roman Empire around 1,500 years ago (SN: 4/25/18). But a new analysis of bones from 13 victims suggests that a violent massacre occurred at a site in what’s now Spain centuries before the Romans arrived, researchers report October 1 in Antiquity.

Finding “partially burnt skeletons and scattered human bones with unhealed injuries caused by sharp weapons demonstrated that this was an extremely violent event,” says archaeologist Javier Ordoño Daubagna of Arkikus, an archaeological research company in Vitoria-Gasteiz, Spain.

Ordoño Daubagna and colleagues examined nine adults, two adolescents, a young child and one infant who died sometime between 365 and 195 B.C., in the ancient village of La Hoya. One of the adults was decapitated in a single blow, the team found. And one of the adolescents, a female, had her arm cut off. The researchers found the arm bones nearly three meters away from the girl’s skeleton, with five copper-alloy bracelets still attached. ...

https://www.sciencenews.org/article/bones-skeletons-iron-age-massacre-prehistoric-europe-spain
 

Kondoru

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Im trying to think where I read that the Iron age folk were peaceful.
 

hunck

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Whatever happened to "sacrificial burial"?

It's gone these days - bloody political correctness. Not sure what you're asking..
 

IbisNibs

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I'm asking for bringing back respect for the dead—before they're dead!
If you're going to stick someone with a spear or chop off their feet or tie their hands behind their backs so you can do them in, at least let them know it's for a special occasion.
 

Nosmo King

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A hoard of Ironage coins has been found at an HS2 excavation.

"Hundreds of rare Iron Age coins have been discovered during a dig on the HS2 route in west London.

The hoard of 300 potins, which are an early version of a coin, were found in Hillingdon, following a storm which helped reveal their position.

Archaeologists have dated them to the 1st century BC, at a time when the Romans were beginning to establish themselves in Britain.

The discovery has been described as a "once-in-a-lifetime find".

Each of the potins are about 3cm (1.2 in) in diameter and are based on coins struck in Marseille, France, about 2,175 years ago."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-london-57833958
 

EnolaGaia

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A Dane using his newly acquired metal detector discovered one of the largest Iron Age gold treasures ever found in Denmark.
Treasure hunter finds gold hoard buried by Iron Age chieftain

An amateur treasure hunter wielding a metal detector has discovered a stunning gold hoard buried by an Iron Age chieftain in the sixth century in what is now Denmark. The stash includes lavish jewelry, Roman coins and an ornament that may depict a Norse god.

The treasure hunter, Ole Ginnerup Schytz, uncovered the Iron Age hoard on land owned by one of his former classmates in the town of Vindelev, earning the stash the name "Vindelev hoard." Within a few hours of surveying the area with his newly acquired metal detector, Schytz heard the telltale beeping of possible treasure. It turned out to be one of the "largest, richest and most beautiful gold treasures in Danish history," representatives of Vejle Museums said in a statement released Sept. 9.

The 1,500-year-old hoard contains nearly 2.2 pounds (1 kilogram) of gold, including large, saucer-sized medallions known as bracteates. An excavation of the site by archaeologists from Vejle Museums, in collaboration with the National Museum of Denmark, revealed that the gold valuables were buried in a longhouse, which may indicate that Vindelev was a powerful village during the Iron Age. ...
FULL STORY: https://www.livescience.com/gold-hoard-sixth-century-denmark
 

ramonmercado

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Rare amber bead found.

Up to 60 local volunteers have been helping archaeologists excavate an iron age fort site dating back to 400 BC.

For three weeks Dyfed Archaeological Trust has been working on Pen Dinas hillfort in Aberystwyth, Ceredigion after receiving funding from Cadw. Archaeologists have made a number of finds including an amber bead and stone wheel thought to be a spindle whorl for weaving.
It is only the second time in its history the site has been excavated.

Leading the excavation, Fran Murphy said: "I think they'd been lost - they were found on a hut platform where someone lived and they'd probably fallen through beneath the floor if you like. The amber is quite a rare find and the person whoever lost these objects would have been quite annoyed."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-58765453
 
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