It's Time We Stop, Hey, What's That Sound

Comfortably Numb

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Whit's this.. Joan Baez live in Edinburgh, 1965...

Jings, Crivens and we'll hae some o' that...

I've briefly browsed for only a minute and this seriously needs an accompanying dram or two...

The sound quality is amazing.

I know what I'm about to see and hear is going to be quintessentially epic... the essence of this entire thread.

Please enjoy & perhaps a glass of wine? :)

 

Comfortably Numb

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Aye, changed times indeed...

IMG_20201012_062725_resize_25.jpg
 

Comfortably Numb

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Dear Santa,

I don't suppose there's a recording of an early CSN&Y concert I have never seen before... :cshock:

 

Comfortably Numb

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Ever since his thread, I've kept a look out for anything perhaps rare and particularly noteworthy.

Fitting comfortably into that category is the following video, featuring 2 hours of outtakes from our seminal 1967 Monterey Pop Festival.

The YouTube upload includes a full playlist.

Amongst the magical moments are:

- Simon and Garfunkel performing 'Homeward Bound' and 'Sounds of Silence'

- The Byrds with their version of 'Hey Joe'

- The Who and 'Summertime Blues'

- The Mamas & The Papas introducing former band member Scott McKenzie to sing 'San Francisco'

Also... coming full circle, Buffalo Springfield and 'For What It's Worth'. :)

 

Mythopoeika

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Is it really 50 years old??


The warmth of 70's albums. Everyone on this album knew exactly what they were doing. I just started crying listening to this :(

The cat's name was Telemachus.
And I'm just watching a character called Telemachus Rhade on TV...
 

EnolaGaia

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Was this song similary rebellious of its time? ...

Its satirical take on American suburban life was recognized at the time. However, because (a) it was criticizing cultural dullness and / or hypocrisy rather than anything overtly political and (b) it was performed by the presumptively innocuous Monkees I don't recall anyone treating it as controversial.
 

hunck

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The Monkees had some great writers composing for them.

They also had absolutely the best session musicians at the time who provided all the music - The Wrecking Crew.
 

Comfortably Numb

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Its satirical take on American suburban life was recognized at the time.

...and (b) it was performed by the presumptively innocuous Monkees I don't recall anyone treating it as controversial.
Wasn't so sure about it being otherwise, hence the essential question mark.

Some further background:

[Start]
Meanwhile, Gerry was not a big fan of the suburbs to begin with, and this would be revealed in the lyrics he wrote for the 1967 song that he and Carole composed for The Monkees – “Pleasant Valley Sunday”, a No. 3 hit in July 1967. The song was pure satire and social commentary on life in suburbia'.

[...]

At the time Goffin and King wrote “Pleasant Valley Sunday,” suburbia was already topical, with a growing collection of popular books and academic literature, some critical, some not.

In any case, Goffin and King’s “Pleasant Valley Sunday” captured a bit of the critical vibe at the time for suburbia in the 1960s".
[End]

https://www.pophistorydig.com/topics/tag/pleasant-valley-sunday-song/
7

This is a 1966 demo recording from Carole King:

0
 

EnolaGaia

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The focal target of the satire's thrust was blithe conformity. This wasn't a new theme in American popular culture and critiques thereof. In the 1950s there were similar satires and hand-wringings over the way postwar civilian life was trending toward placid consumerism, dog-eat-dog competitiveness in the workplace, and cookie-cutter lifestyles and lives for everyone. Attention to, and rejection of, this scenario was part of the basis for the beat generation's rebelliousness.

In the Sixties little had changed, the facts and failures of conformity culture had become all the more obvious, and this theme gained a visibility far beyond its status in the prior decade. By the same token, criticizing it had shifted from 'unthinkably contrarian' to 'everybody senses it'. This shift explains why a pop group could score a hit without really offending anyone.
 

hunck

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This is one of the all time great rock performances in my book. Joe Cocker's final song at Woodstock. A lightweight Beatles tune transformed into a monster. Extraordinary performance by Joe. They also did a great version of Dylan's Just Like A Woman which is unrecognisable to the original.

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" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>
 
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