Jo Yeates tragedy

rynner2

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#1
Possibly it's too early to post this story here; maybe a body will turn up, and we'll have a murder mystery instead, or perhaps a freak accident. But for the moment it's a missing person mystery.

Family of woman missing from Bristol to make new appeal

The family of a 25-year-old woman who has been missing for six days from her home in Bristol is to make a new appeal for information later.

Joanna Yeates, a landscape architect, has not been seen since 17 December when she went to a pub with colleagues.
Ms Yeates, originally from Hampshire, is then thought to have returned to the flat she shares with her boyfriend, as receipts from shops were found there.

On Wednesday police with dogs searched the Downs and the cliffs at Avon Gorge.

Ms Yeates was last seen leaving the Ram pub on Park Street at about 2000 GMT. Detectives believe she then went back to her home in Canynge Road in the Clifton area.

She was reported missing by her boyfriend, Greg Reardon, on Sunday after he returned to Bristol from a visit to his family in Sheffield.
Officers are examining Mr Reardon's phone and laptop as part of their investigation. Police say Mr Reardon is not a suspect in Ms Yeates' disappearance.

Detectives have also been examining CCTV footage for clues.
Det Supt Mark Saunders said: "You can see lots of people walking up and down and vehicles driving up and down on Friday night and the early hours of Saturday morning.
"We'd really like to get hold of any of those people because if anyone was in that street [Canynge Road], even if you didn't think you saw anything you might be able to help."

Speaking at a news conference on Tuesday, her father David Yeates, from Ampfield, Hampshire, said: "Whatever the reason you haven't been in touch over the last few days, we want you to know we love you dearly and are desperate to know you are safe and well."

Rebecca Scott, a close friend of Ms Yeates, said: "We are all terribly worried about her as none of her friends, family or work colleagues have seen or spoken to her since Friday evening.
"This is totally out of character for Jo and there seems to be no rational explanation as to why she would have left her flat without any of her belongings.
"She had phoned me on her way home from the Ram pub at around 8 o'clock on Friday and we arranged to meet on Christmas Eve.
"She was travelling down that day with her boyfriend to spend time with her parents. She was totally fine, and very happy at the time."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-12065704
 

rynner2

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#3
Whether or not this case is finally resolved, it does give us an immediate insight into all that happens when someone disappears:

Vigil for missing Bristol architect Joanna Yeates

The family of missing woman Joanna Yeates are taking part in a vigil for her at a church in Bristol later.
The landscape architect, 25, disappeared a week ago and specialist teams continue to search areas around the Clifton Downs and Avon Gorge.
Her parents, who live in Hampshire, have said they fear she has been abducted and could be dead.

Christ Church in Clifton will be saying prayers for Joanna and her family are attending midnight mass on Friday.

Ms Yeates was last seen on 17 December when she went to a pub with colleagues.
She is thought to have returned to the Clifton flat she shares with 27-year-old boyfriend Greg Reardon, but it is not know what happened next.
Her keys, mobile phone, purse and coat had been left behind.

Mr Reardon reported her missing to police on Sunday when he returned from a weekend visiting family in Sheffield.

Reverend Paul Langham, from Christ Church, said: "At all our services over the next couple of days we will be remembering the family in prayer and particularly at the midnight service we will be having a vigil as part of that service.
"Beyond that, obviously there may be people who have ongoing need for somebody to talk with and we are one of the places that people might feel able to come."

He said the doors would be open for anyone who wanted to light a candle or say prayers for Ms Yeates.

Her brother, Chris, has been handing out leaflets and putting up posters around Bristol in the hope of someone coming forward with new information.
He said: "We are just in complete despair about where she is and how everything happened. We just don't know."

Her father David Yeates said on Thursday: "I think she was abducted after getting home to her flat.
"I have no idea of the circumstances of the abduction but because of what was left behind in the flat we feel she wouldn't have gone out by herself leaving those things behind."

Det Ch Insp Gareth Bevan, from Avon and Somerset Police, has said a missing pizza could provide a vital clue as to Ms Yeates' whereabouts.

He said she bought a Tesco Finest tomato, mozzarella and basil pesto pizza on her way home but there was no trace of the pizza, the wrapping or the box in her flat.


Police officers and mountain rescue teams spent much of Wednesday scouring cliffs and woodland around the Avon Gorge for any sign of the missing 25-year-old, who is originally from Hampshire.

In a message to his daughter, Mr Yeates said: "Please come home Jo. Our hearts are breaking up with not having our little girl with us. Greg is going through hell.
"Please contact us, we don't know what to do without you.

"If she's dead, please tell somebody where she is. We want her back whatever."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-12073244
 

rynner2

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#4
Police searching for missing architect Jo Yeates are now probing similarities with mystery of chef Claudia Lawrence who vanished
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 10:56 PM on 24th December 2010

Detectives investigating the disappearance of architect Jo Yeates are looking at similarities with the vanishing of chef Claudia Lawrence.
Officers admitted yesterday the cases are factually similar - but said there is no evidence yet to suggest the cases are linked.

Blonde Claudia, 35, vanished from her home in Heworth, York, in March 2009 and was reported missing when she failed to turn up for work.

Like 25-year-old Joanna, her bank cards and other personal possessions were left at home but no trace of her has ever been found.
Jo's disappearance also bears chilling similarities to that of Melanie Hall, who vanished after leaving a nightclub in nearby Bath, Somerset, in 1996.
Her remains were found dumped on a motorway sliproad in October last year - 13 years after she went missing.

North Yorkshire Police and Avon and Somerset Police confirmed yesterday that they have 'liaised' over the disappearance of Jo.
A spokesman for North Yorkshire Police said: 'It is too early to say if there are any links with the investigation into the disappearance of Claudia Lawrence as the Bristol enquiry is in the very early stages.
'However, North Yorkshire Police have been in contact with Avon and Somerset Police and will continue that liaison over the coming days.'

Chief Superintendent Jon Stratford of Avon and Somerset Police said: 'Our investigations team have been contacted by their team (North Yorks Police) but there is nothing to suggest a link between the two disappearances.'

etc...

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z197EUG0WR
 

rynner2

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#5
Oh no...

Body of woman found in hunt for Joanna Yeates

The body was found by a couple walking their dogs on Christmas morning Police looking for missing Bristol architect Joanna Yeates have sealed off an area near a golf course after a couple found the body of a woman.

Officers have sealed off Longwood Lane in Failand, North Somerset, following the discovery.

etc...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-12079050
 

rynner2

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#8
Police try to unlock riddle of landscape architect's final hours
Identity of frozen body is confirmed, with cause of death expected to be revealed today. Rob Sharp reports from Bristol
Monday, 27 December 2010

Her handbag sat undisturbed on the kitchen table. Her purse was there. So were her keys and her mobile phone. There was even the receipt for a Tesco Finest margherita pizza – the last meal Joanna Yeates bought. There was no sign of Ms Yeates herself, though, nor of anything to indicate forced entry or a struggle.

Minutes after that simple supermarket transaction 10 days ago, she returned to her home 250 yards away, and then soon afterwards she left without any of her belongings, to disappear from the lives of her boyfriend and her parents for ever.

Detectives have struggled to make sense of the eerie scene – assuming a degree of coercion in her vanishing, but lacking any evidence to support that. Then yesterday brought the news that a frozen corpse, found covered in ice and snow on a grass verge on the outskirts of Bristol, was that of the 25-year-old landscape architect.

The Yeates family were travelling to Bristol from their home in Hampshire yesterday formally to identify her body. "It hasn't been Christmas for us," said her father, David, 63. "It's been surreal, totally unreal."

Mr Yeates was convinced that his daughter was abducted after seeing the bizarre scene at her flat. "We knew what the flat was like," he said. "We know what she does and doesn't do. We were 100 per cent convinced within 30 minutes of arriving at the flat that she had been abducted."

Detectives have moved house by house through the upmarket Clifton area of Bristol where she lived, checking bins and gardens for any evidence that will shed light on her flight.

Detectives still seek answers to two basic questions. How did Ms Yeates cross the Clifton Suspension Bridge, the 400-metre structure spanning the nearby Avon Gorge, which is the main artery linking Clifton to Failand, where her clothed body was found by two dog walkers on Christmas Day?

And where is the margherita pizza, the only item that appears to be missing from her flat?

Detectives are scouring CCTV footage shot around the Clifton Suspension Bridge on 17 December, the night that they believe she disappeared.

On Avon and Somerset Police's unusual pursuit of the pizza clue, Chief Superintendent Jon Stratford said: "There is obviously the possibility that she went somewhere else to eat that pizza. All we know is that we found her possessions inside the flat along with the receipt, but not the pizza. So she did get back in on the Friday evening."

Today should bring the results of a post-mortem examination – delayed until now because the freezing conditions in which her body was found made earlier examination impossible. The hope is to establish a cause of death.

Detectives have also examined the phone and the computer of her boyfriend, Greg Reardon, 27, an architect at the same firm, who reported her missing to police on 19 December, two days after the couple last spoke. Officers have said that they believe he had nothing to do with her disappearance.

Yesterday a white forensics tent stood over the golf course verge where Ms Yeates was found, close to Bristol Football Club's training ground. A police spokeswoman said: "While a formal identification procedure is yet to be completed, police are satisfied that the body is that of the 25-year-old landscape architect Joanna Yeates.

"Officers are treating Joanna's death as suspicious at this stage but will not be able to discuss this further until the results of the post-mortem are known. The police are once again appealing for information, in particular to help fill in the gap between Joanna's disappearance and the discovery of her body."

etc...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/cr ... 69851.html
 

rynner2

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#9
Detectives have highlighted the ‘striking similarities’ between Miss Yeates’s disappearance and the unsolved murder of Melanie Hall.
Miss Hall disappeared without a trace in 1996 from a Bath nightclub, 14 miles from Miss Yeates’s home in Bristol.

Both women were 25 when they vanished after apparently returning home following a social engagement with friends.
They had short blonde hair, and their graduation pictures show two women of similar appearance.

Miss Hall’s remains were found next to a slip road at junction 14 of the M5 last October near the village of Falfield.

A man was arrested in July and questioned on suspicion of her murder but no one has been charged. Yesterday a police source said: ‘There are some striking similarities in these cases.

‘They are both pretty girls who look very similar and who vanished without a trace. The geographic link is there and the fact that they have both been placed by the side of roads is also very disturbing.’

He added: ‘We don’t know if the cases are related at the moment, partly because of the time delay.

‘But a member of the [Melanie Hall] team has talked to the officers looking for Jo’s abductor and is following it with interest just in case.’

Detectives have also been sharing information with officers investigating the disappearance of Claudia Lawrence in York in March last year. The 35-year-old chef’s bank cards were found at her home, as were Miss Yeates’s in Bristol.

...

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... z19JkW6Tdw
 

rynner2

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#10
Man arrested in Joanna Yeates murder inquiry

A 65-year-old man has been arrested on suspicion of the murder of landscape architect Joanna Yeates.
Police said the man was arrested just after 0700 GMT at an address in Canynge Road, in the Clifton area of Bristol, where 25-year-old Ms Yeates lived.
The man is being detained for questioning at a police station within the Avon and Somerset force area.

Ms Yeates' body was discovered on Christmas Day, eight days after she disappeared. She had been strangled.

...

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-12092600

Yesterday we learned

Murdered Joanna Yeates 'seen leaving with two people'

Police have confirmed they are investigating claims murder victim Joanna Yeates was outside her flat with two people on the night she vanished.
The landlord of the property in Bristol has told detectives he saw three people leaving and believes one of them was 25-year-old Ms Yeates.

Crimestoppers has offered a £10,000 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of her killer.

Ms Yeates' body was discovered on Christmas Day. She had been strangled.
The discovery was made in Longwood Lane, in Failand near Bristol, by a couple walking their dogs.

Detective Chief Inspector Phil Jones said: "There are a number of lines of enquiry we are following up.
"One of these concerns apparent reports that several people were seen or heard in or around Joanna's flat on the night of her disappearance."

Officers have also removed the front door to Ms Yeates' flat in Canynge Road as part of the investigation.
A police spokeswoman said: "The door is being taken for forensic analysis."

....

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-12089150

Other papers identify the man as her landlord:
Avon and Somerset Police arrested a 65 year-old man just after 7am this morning at his flat on Canynge Road in Bristol.

It is understood that Christopher Jefferies is in custody in the Avon and Somerset area and has been detained for questioning.

Mr Jeffries earlier, who lived in the same building as his tenant, told police and neighbours that he had seen Miss Yeates leave her flat with two other people on the night she went missing.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/ ... urder.html
Let's hope this is real progress.
 

LordRsmacker

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#12
Jesus, looks like this bloke's been done up like a (Mr) Kipper*. If I had information about a crime, I'd not expect to be besieged by cameras and reporters outside in the street. In fact, I'd go so far as to say "Fuck you, I retract my statement, I saw nothing" to the police if they chose to let all and sundry know who has been saying what, before any arrests have been made. How will it make other potential witnesses feel, if they suddenly find ITV on the doorstep, after they reported something they saw whilst out with their girlfriend (their wife being at home)?

Considering the first person in any case like this to come under suspicion is naturally the partner, this poor woman's other half has been very well shielded, nothing really has been published about him, but this landlord's life history is there on the Telegraph website. Why not give us the guff on the boyfriend?

It just seems to me that Plod has let this landlord, who is apparently "an eccentric", hang himself out to dry - as soon as I see any witness or partner being harassed or lapping up the limelight on TV (a la Ian Huntley etc) I automatically think "Yep, that's yer man".

It's early days, he only got nicked this morning, and I hope there's concrete evidence for an arrest, not simply because he was a bit of a strange guy who seemed to enjoy being drawn into the investigation, lest we have another Barry George situation a few years down the line and an unpunished murderer on the loose.

Anyone else disturbed by the speed all of this has unfolded? Yesterday "a witness reported seeing 3 people, one of whom was possibly the missing girl", less than 24 hours later, we have a weirdo, (who looks like Paul Gadd, yes Black River Falls) life story, TV interview neatly bundled up and nicked. Case closed M'lud, can't we just hang him now?

* A little "Missing Persons" reference for those old enough to remember. Still no body found in that case.....
 

Quake42

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#13
Why not give us the guff on the boyfriend?
As I understand it he was with his family in Sheffield all weekend - presumably the police are satisfied with his alibi.

Re: the landlord, we'll have to wait and see. It's a very curious case.
 

LordRsmacker

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#14
Quake42 said:
Why not give us the guff on the boyfriend?
As I understand it he was with his family in Sheffield all weekend - presumably the police are satisfied with his alibi.
Exactly my point, the implication is that Plod is NOT satisfied with the landlord. In the good old days they'd have just said that someone had been arrested, you'd have got the detail when he was CHARGED. I find it astonishing that the landlord's life details are all over the media and he's only just been arrested, or as they used to say "helping the police with their enquiries". (Yeah, and I'm well aware that I'm contributing to the noise surrounding this case)

This less trial by media, and more trial by Plod, they seem to be happy they have their man. I hope the CPS agrees....
 

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#15
A lot of the reporting about, and photos of, the landlord were in fact produced yesterday, when he was still just a possible witness.

It's not surprising the press are using this material now, when he's been arrested on suspicion of murder.

The photos do not show him being arrested - probably 7am is a bit early for most of the press corps! ;)
 

rynner2

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#16
rynner2 said:
The photos do not show him being arrested - probably 7am is a bit early for most of the press corps! ;)
Apparently there were several media people around early (did they have a tip-off?) - but none of them actually witnessed the arrest!
 

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#17
Exactly my point, the implication is that Plod is NOT satisfied with the landlord. In the good old days they'd have just said that someone had been arrested, you'd have got the detail when he was CHARGED
I'm not sure that's true - the police have always been happy to leak certain details to the media, especially in a high profile case like this.

My guess is that the mysterious Tesco pizza is going to be crucial here, and I can speculate that evidence of its whereabouts may have piqued the interest in the landlord.
 

rynner2

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#18
When Jo's parents visited her flat, they immediately spotted something amiss, but the Police asked them not to speak about it to anyone else.

The landlord would probably have duplicate keys to his tenants' flats. Convenient for tidying-up a crime scene.

And perhaps the police trawl though CCTV images turned up evidence of his car crossing the suspension bridge at significant times.

All in all, the Police could have quite a bit of evidence, which will not be revealed until a trial takes place.
 

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#19
Quake42 said:
I'm not sure that's true - the police have always been happy to leak certain details to the media, especially in a high profile case like this.
Well they shouldn't. They should concentrate on getting the evidence, charging him, and letting the courts decide, not Sky News or internet forums.
Appealing for information is one thing, this, I fear is something different, something perhaps more sinister. As Rynner says, a lot of the reporting on this chap was produced yesterday before he was even arrested. Did Plod tip them off, in the hope he'd trip himself up, or are they looking at the stuff the hacks have dug up and decided he's a good bet for a suspect? Would you be happy if you had possible information on a crime and the press went into your life story, telling the world if you were arrested, even for technical reasons which eliminate you from the enquiry? (Like, say, you were out burgling and saw a murder.)

Let's just say for a moment that someone walks into a police station and confesses to the crime, and it's clear they did it, where would this old boy be then? He'd be the landlord that no-one would feel comfortable with, there's no smoke without fire, right?

Was nothing learned from the outrageous treatment of Colin Stagg, a man guaranteed to never have the chance of a quiet life without people talking behind his back, despite it being proven he was 100% innocent? (Am I right in saying he's still not had all of his compensation money?)

I wonder how many people out there have watched this story develop today and have closed the case in their minds already, even I've got it in my head that the investigation is over. Considering everyone falls over themself to protect privacy with Data Protection etc etc, it's bizarre that it's open season on the landlord.

As I said before, lets hope that if he is charged and comes to trial, the court don't decide that there is no chance of him getting a fair trial and acquits him, I know I couldn't possibly be an impartial juror after what I've read, could you? I sincerely hope the person(s) responsible for this woman's death is brought to book, but this leaves me feeling uneasy. It's just not the British way!
 

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#20
Well they shouldn't. They should concentrate on getting the evidence, charging him, and letting the courts decide, not Sky News or internet forums.
I don't disagree with this - I just think that your original claim that "in the good old days" the police never leaked information on high profile cases was a rather rose-tinted view of the past.

Appealing for information is one thing, this, I fear is something different, something perhaps more sinister. As Rynner says, a lot of the reporting on this chap was produced yesterday before he was even arrested. Did Plod tip them off, in the hope he'd trip himself up, or are they looking at the stuff the hacks have dug up and decided he's a good bet for a suspect?
I don't think they would arrest him on the basis that he was formerly a rather "flamboyant" (read: camp and/or gay) teacher at a minor public school. I suspect your former suggestion is correct: they had suspicions about him, probably from the start (unusually for a case of this nature there were no general warnings to women walking alone at night) and someone tipped off the media prior to the arrest. I agree it leaves a nasty taste in the mouth. The Telegraph has a particularly lurid piece on him.

*Edited for typo
 

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#21
Quake42 said:
I don't disagree with this - I just think that your original claim that "in the good old days" the police never leaked information on high profile cases was a rather rose-tinted view of the past.
Perhaps it was more the fact that if anything was leaked, it'd maybe go to a tame journo, who'd rush to get a scoop for his paper. Then the following day, the rest would pick up on it. By the time the rest of the country knew, the case was wrapped up, charges brought.

Today, when the Chief Constable farts, Sky News have live footage and someone will have already assembled an "expert panel" to tell you what he had for breakfast before the trump has even tailed off. With that in mind, they should exercise a bit more caution IMHO, everyone knows that rolling news networks aren't going to go with the mundane, boring legwork that makes up an average murder investigation, they need something exciting to show RIGHT NOW.
They'll sensationalise as much as they can, I mean, look at the coverage of forensic teams removing cars today. Not a new procedure, happens all the time, for basic investigative reasons, is it newsworthy? Do I really need the BBC there covering every move? Ah, must be because he moved the body in the boot, the evil bastard!

High Speed information delivery is great, but it doesn't bode well for a sound conviction. Information can change the direction of an investigation two or three times in a short space of time as more is uncovered. It soon looks like Plod doesn't know what day of the week it is, especially if the media are reporting every move. How many detectives are going to want to be asked about info they've let out, which subsequently turns out to be irrelevant, or plain wrong?

This is the way that someone finds themself arrested, and things are made to fit to show their guilt, so that the Supt. doesn't have to appear on the news making contradictory statements every day. If the Govt bring in this thing to vote Police Chiefs into office, how long before we have a Blair-style tosser more interested in his public image, trying to be always right, always smooth, than telling the truth - that often the evidence is a swirl of disjointed clues that sometimes point somewhere but upon closer inspection point elsewhere?
 

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#22
Quake42 said:
The Telegraph has a particularly lurid piece on him.
I think the Guardian went even further:
Jefferies was known as a flamboyant master, particularly fond of the work of Christina Rossetti, when he taught at Clifton College. He was said to be wont to mispronounce obscure place names in extravagant ways. One former pupil said that at one time his hair appeared to have been dyed blue.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/dec/3 ... t-landlord
But it's natural the media will take an interest in anyone close to a murder case. The boyfriend was miles away when Jo went missing (and you can be sure the Police will have thoroughly checked his alibi) while the landlord was actually in the same building. In fact the police's suspicion were heightened when the landlord told the neighbours he'd seen people outside her flat, and it was them, not him, who told the Police that. And then he claimed he'd been 'misreported'.

The Police have also refused to comment on the autopsy results regarding stomach contents. As Quake says, the Tesco Pizza could well be a vital clue.
 

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#23
LordRsmacker said:
....look at the coverage of forensic teams removing cars today. Not a new procedure, happens all the time, for basic investigative reasons, is it newsworthy?
If there's not much else happening, of course they'll film this.

I was more interested in the fact that they also removed the front door and took it away. I've never heard of this happening before (in RL or fiction), and I can't imagine what kind of forensic evidence they'll find in a lab that they couldn't have got with the door in situ. This is another reason to think that the cops know more than they're letting on.
 

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#24
He was said to be wont to mispronounce obscure place names in extravagant ways.
A teacher friend used to do a similar thing so that the kids would remember the word from the 'silly' version.

The Telegraph article is banging on about what scarf he wore in 1975

:roll:
 

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#25
rynner2 said:
I was more interested in the fact that they also removed the front door and took it away. I've never heard of this happening before (in RL or fiction), and I can't imagine what kind of forensic evidence they'll find in a lab that they couldn't have got with the door in situ. This is another reason to think that the cops know more than they're letting on.
That's not unusual practice either, I guess they can spend longer examining the door rather than just dusting it on-site, where people will be coming and going to and from the scene, potentially contaminating evidence. I'm not going to fall over in shock if it turns out there's some of the landlord's DNA on this door, in his house!

Maybe they have got something on him, strange he hasn't caved in yet, or even that they feel they have enough to charge him, he's been in there all day. Don't know why they couldn't have just done the forensics on the door etc and then nicked him if appropriate, he probably wasn't about to do a bunk.
As Colombo used to prove every episode, give a guilty person a bit of space, and he'll drop himself in it in no time, especially if he's not a career criminal, a habitual liar.

To me, their main hope is the car - he'd have to have used it to move her, and there will be some evidence left inside. Perhaps they had to nick him before being able to examine it, although they could have just asked - why would anyone with nothing to hide object? Eeh, speculation of the exact type I find so objectionable (although my audience doesn't pay much attention to me though, do they? WAKE UP AT THE BACK!)

Listening to the news tonight, it said that he had been taken to an un-named police station. Bit late to start being discreet now isn't it? Unless they are scared the A-Team might break him out.
 

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#26
LordRsmacker said:
rynner2 said:
I was more interested in the fact that they also removed the front door and took it away.
That's not unusual practice either, I guess they can spend longer examining the door rather than just dusting it on-site, where people will be coming and going to and from the scene, potentially contaminating evidence. I'm not going to fall over in shock if it turns out there's some of the landlord's DNA on this door, in his house!
Well, the door's been there for nearly two weeks since Jo went missing, so any self-respecting master-criminal could have polished it clean as a whistle by now (and then put his own prints and DNA traces back on it, to throw police off the scent). I really hope this goes to trial, so we can find out what they were looking for - assuming they find it, that is.
 

LordRsmacker

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#28
rynner2 said:
Well, the door's been there for nearly two weeks since Jo went missing, so any self-respecting master-criminal could have polished it clean as a whistle by now (and then put his own prints and DNA traces back on it, to throw police off the scent). I really hope this goes to trial, so we can find out what they were looking for - assuming they find it, that is.

I think it would be more for stuff left from a corpse when it gets pushed past the door. A dead body is not an easy thing to carry on your own. Um, apparently.

It has occurred to me that this might all be a red herring, that the Old Bill may doubt he is a serious suspect, but have dragged him in allowing a song and dance, hoping that someone else might relax their guard and slip up. Maybe I just watch too much Colombo....!
 

rynner2

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#29
Man held in Jo Yeates case is 'pillar of society'

The man arrested on suspicion of murdering Jo Yeates has been described by neighbours as an eccentric "pillar of society".

Chris Jefferies, 65, lives in a flat above the one he rented to Miss Yeates and her boyfriend.
Mr Jefferies is a retired public school teacher who taught English at Clifton College, just yards from his home in Canynge Road, in the Clifton area of Bristol.

Miss Yeates vanished after returning to the basement flat on 17 December.
Her body was found on a grass verge about three miles away on Longwood Lane in Failand on Christmas Day.

Mr Jefferies is understood to have told neighbours he thought he had seen Miss Yeates leave the flat with two others on the evening she disappeared.
But hours after the claim was revealed, he was arrested by police.

Neighbours have said that Mr Jefferies, a bachelor who sports a distinctive mane of straggly white hair, plays a prominent role in his local Neighbourhood Watch group.
He is also a member of a local historical group dedicated to conserving buildings in the area.

Ray Lowman, who lives opposite Mr Jefferies, said: "I knew him through the Neighbourhood Watch.
"I'm amazed by it really but also find it quite disconcerting."
Asked about Mr Jefferies' community activities, Mr Lowman said: "He is basically a pillar of society. One of the well-known familiar locals."
He acknowledged Mr Jefferies', at times, unconventional manner of dress.
"It is one of the problems. His appearance is unusual.
"We weren't good friends. I wouldn't say he was weird but unusual and the hair is an affectation.
"He's a very intelligent man, very sharp."

Mark Moore, headteacher at Clifton College, said Mr Jefferies had taken early retirement in 2001.
He had formerly been head of English at the independent school, which has fees of more than £9,000 a term.

There were no disciplinary issues recorded against the former member of staff, Mr Moore said.
"There was nothing in his record at all," he said. "He took early retirement, which he's perfectly entitled to do, when a new head of English came into the school and he decided to bow out."

Mr Moore said: "I've been headmaster here for six years and I've certainly never met Mr Jefferies and there will be very few people on the current teaching staff, and pupils, who have ever met Mr Jefferies.
"Although he lived locally, he had no formal contact with the college since he retired."

Mr Jefferies was vice chairman of his local Neighbourhood Watch, and an active member of Clifton and Hotwells Improvement Society(Chis) which campaigns to conserve buildings.
Chis secretary RoseMary Musgrave said: "He's certainly an active member and does come to meetings from time to time. He's not a member of the committee though."

In 2005 he was at the forefront of efforts to stop building work on fields near his home.
He led the Canynge Road Campaign Group to save the fields from development and wrote a series of letters to Bristol City Council outlining the group's opposition to the scheme.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-bristol-12094715

He must be innocent then!
 

Cultjunky

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#30
I think one of the most interesting aspects of this, along with the Raul Moat Show, is the involvement of the media. With rolling 24/7 news, the media now seems to focus on the most sensational aspects of a case. His 'affectation' hair style and odd clothes didn't seem odd to me, my Physics teacher, my French teacher, my Classics proff all sported similar do's. The door removal - well that's just part of an ongoing investigation isn't it?

IIRC, wasn't there a bit of a todo and a hoo har in the MJ abuse case, because of the involvement of the media? Something to do with him being unable to have a fair trial due to the huge media interest in the case prejudicing potential jury members? (I know, I know, I should have been paying attention, but bugger me it was dull)

I wouldn't be surprised if that scenario doesn't happen soon, maybe not this case, but it's not too large an imagination leap. Whilst I would never want to have a 'gagged' media reporting to me over my cornflakes, perhaps the debate should occur regarding responsible reporting.
 
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