Jordan Peterson

Krepostnoi

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Fate is far from egalitarian when it comes to the allotment of suffering and I don't think there is anything but the very loosest link between one's own travails and one's concern for others.

If anything, those who suffer remorselssly are just as likely to becone inured to the suffering of others--doubly so when they are powerless to ameliorate it.
Strange as it may sound, research suggests the opposite is true.

(Apologies for the link to a popular science digest, but my OH has read a lot about Dacher Keltner, who is quoted in the article, and she suggests the studies are sound. Interested readers can, of course, pick up the references contained within the article.)

The historian Henry Adams was being metaphorical, not medical, when he described power as “a sort of tumor that ends by killing the victim’s sympathies.” But that’s not far from where Dacher Keltner, a psychology professor at UC Berkeley, ended up after years of lab and field experiments. Subjects under the influence of power, he found in studies spanning two decades, acted as if they had suffered a traumatic brain injury—becoming more impulsive, less risk-aware, and, crucially, less adept at seeing things from other people’s point of view.
Meanwhile:
Recalling an early experience of powerlessness seems to work for some people—and experiences that were searing enough may provide a sort of permanent protection. An incredible study published in The Journal of Finance last February found that CEOs who as children had lived through a natural disaster that produced significant fatalities were much less risk-seeking than CEOs who hadn’t.
 

Yithian

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Strange as it may sound, research suggests the opposite is true.

(Apologies for the link to a popular science digest, but my OH has read a lot about Dacher Keltner, who is quoted in the article, and she suggests the studies are sound. Interested readers can, of course, pick up the references contained within the article.)


Meanwhile:
Might be true, but the possession of power does not equal the absence of suffering. And the human condition offers a surfeit of pains that render every man equally powerless and defy consolation.

The prince grieves as the pauper.

(Unless one is a dastardly Nietzschean (or worse an 'objectivist' simpleton), in which case you might think that trivial people suffer trivially).
 

AlchoPwn

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Fate is far from egalitarian when it comes to the allotment of suffering and I don't think there is anything but the very loosest link between one's own travails and one's concern for others.
Perhaps you are correct, but in my experience those who have the least compassion for a given ailment are those who haven't suffered something similar.
If anything, those who suffer remorselessly are just as likely to become inured to the suffering of others--doubly so when they are powerless to ameliorate it.
I would agree that those who suffer too much begin to think other people are being wimps. Perspective is an interesting thing, not the least of all because not many align.
 

AlchoPwn

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JP appears to have gone in the opposite direction. He has a PhD in psychology but seems to think that the notoriety he gained as a result of the U of T controversy makes him an authority on environmental science, nutrition, etc. As other posters have observed upthread, he should stick to his own field of study. That's what academics are supposed to do, after all. JP's inflated ego is quite astounding and I can't help but wonder if that has been a factor in his illness. Nevertheless, I'm sorry that he's ill and I hope he recovers.
I thought your post was very fair and I agree with all of it I think. As to JP's flutter with being a generalist, no doubt it is a symptom of too much praise and the belief that one is a philosopher who may speak to generalisms. As you correctly say, "big ego", supported by too much media hype. Hopefully he will be a better and less hubristic person when he recovers. After all, a philosopher lives dangerously specifically so they can learn real life lessons, and it would be a shame if he didn't take stock and learn from what he has been thru.
 

Krepostnoi

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Might be true, but the possession of power does not equal the absence of suffering. And the human condition offers a surfeit of pains that render every man equally powerless and defy consolation.

The prince grieves as the pauper.

(Unless one is a dastardly Nietzschean (or worse an 'objectivist' simpleton), in which case you might think that trivial people suffer trivially).
Well, sure. I'll resist the temptation to go off down a tangent about how much emotional damage is inflicted by the expensive boarding school education many UK politicians undergo... But your thesis seemed to be it was specifically those who were powerless to effect change that were more likely to become indifferent to others' suffering:
doubly so when they are powerless to ameliorate it.
The research seems to suggest that in fact the reverse is true.
 

Patrick30

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I could have written a 6 paragraph paper outling the obvious.
Sry, I thought I was conserving pixels.
Carry on.
 
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