Just Plain Awful 'Comedy'

Stormkhan

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Akin/close cousin to Mrs Brown's Boys is Carla Lane's Bread which I, for one, actually despised.
Carla Lane is oft quoted as an excellent comedic writer and, so a certain extent, I agree. The Liver Birds, Butterflies, even Solo were nice, well-observed series. They were all 'gentle' comedy which poked fun and examined life from the perspective of a female of the time; young scouser 'birds', a suburban wife, a young woman feeling used and put-upon.
Then came Bread which it can be argued drew upon the social pressure of the mid-eighties i.e. unemployment and money.
I hated it! At the time, I was unemployed and faced the stigma of "wanting something for nothing", being unemployed meant you were either begging or lying. Then along came a sitcom featuring a family of "cheeky" scousers who were happy to break the law, cheat the system and basically play to the current popular opinion.
"Oh, look at that Joey - turning up in a stolen/on loan Rolls Royce to sign on the dole! Really funny!" It wasn't funny. At all.
>> "Though the show was popular, and received audiences over 21 million, Bread was criticised for mocking Liverpudlian culture and people, who had suffered significant economic downturn and unemployment in the 1980s. Lane countered these criticisms saying that her characters were cartoonish and one-dimensional, and were not intended to be a serious social comment on the state of Liverpool." << (Source: Wikipedia)
Sounds to me like a non-apology along the lines of "I'm sorry you think you are offended".
>> "This union led to one of the series' most famous catchphrases, which Nellie frequently declared about Lilo Lil in a storm of rage: "She is a tart!" << (Source: ibid.) How's that for comedy genius! A series catchphrase is "She is a tart!"?

Thinking back, Carla Lane was ahead of the game. She made (a lot of money) from Bread by making a comedy of Benefits Street, that hard-hitting and balanced documentary from Channel 4. :mad:
 

Souleater

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Akin/close cousin to Mrs Brown's Boys is Carla Lane's Bread which I, for one, actually despised.
Carla Lane is oft quoted as an excellent comedic writer and, so a certain extent, I agree. The Liver Birds, Butterflies, even Solo were nice, well-observed series. They were all 'gentle' comedy which poked fun and examined life from the perspective of a female of the time; young scouser 'birds', a suburban wife, a young woman feeling used and put-upon.
Then came Bread which it can be argued drew upon the social pressure of the mid-eighties i.e. unemployment and money.
I hated it! At the time, I was unemployed and faced the stigma of "wanting something for nothing", being unemployed meant you were either begging or lying. Then along came a sitcom featuring a family of "cheeky" scousers who were happy to break the law, cheat the system and basically play to the current popular opinion.
"Oh, look at that Joey - turning up in a stolen/on loan Rolls Royce to sign on the dole! Really funny!" It wasn't funny. At all.
>> "Though the show was popular, and received audiences over 21 million, Bread was criticised for mocking Liverpudlian culture and people, who had suffered significant economic downturn and unemployment in the 1980s. Lane countered these criticisms saying that her characters were cartoonish and one-dimensional, and were not intended to be a serious social comment on the state of Liverpool." << (Source: Wikipedia)
Sounds to me like a non-apology along the lines of "I'm sorry you think you are offended".
>> "This union led to one of the series' most famous catchphrases, which Nellie frequently declared about Lilo Lil in a storm of rage: "She is a tart!" << (Source: ibid.) How's that for comedy genius! A series catchphrase is "She is a tart!"?

Thinking back, Carla Lane was ahead of the game. She made (a lot of money) from Bread by making a comedy of Benefits Street, that hard-hitting and balanced documentary from Channel 4. :mad:
On a side note the acrtess that played Lilo Lil died recently
 

stu neville

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I never knew that about Bergerac.
Yeah, they even had Charles Gray playing Crowley in all but name in one of them.
The thing about Hugh Grant is he can only play Hugh Grant in all his films
It's been said before, he apparently resented the degree to which he was typecast, but was pragmatic enough to know that's what paid the bills. He's since said he's glad he's aged as he can now play much more interesting parts, and he's lately proved just how good he is (his turn as Thorpe in "A Very British Scandal" was brilliant, and The Undoing was very enjoyable too.)
Akin/close cousin to Mrs Brown's Boys is Carla Lane's Bread which I, for one, actually despised.
Ditto to both. So-say bucking a stereotype whilst actually reinforcing it. I hated Bread with a passion, but Mrs Brown is a pantomime with one-joke which wasn't funny in the first place.
 

Analogue Boy

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Yeah, they even had Charles Gray playing Crowley in all but name in one of them.

It's been said before, he apparently resented the degree to which he was typecast, but was pragmatic enough to know that's what paid the bills. He's since said he's glad he's aged as he can now play much more interesting parts, and he's lately proved just how good he is (his turn as Thorpe in "A Very British Scandal" was brilliant, and The Undoing was very enjoyable too.)
Ditto to both. So-say bucking a stereotype whilst actually reinforcing it. I hated Bread with a passion, but Mrs Brown is a pantomime with one-joke which wasn't funny in the first place.
Don’t forget Hugh Grant in Paddington 2. He chewed the scenery out of that.

I never really got into the bittersweet tone of Carla Lane’s stuff and avoided Bread like the plague and I’m completely bewildered as to what the beeb sees in Mrs. Brown’s Boys.
 

Peripart

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I never really got into the bittersweet tone of Carla Lane’s stuff and avoided Bread like the plague and I’m completely bewildered as to what the beeb sees in Mrs. Brown’s Boys.
I can't remember what programme it was (might have been Smith & Jones or similar), but I remember a very apt spoof trailer for a new Carla Lane sitcom, which was said to contain "pathos, bathos, and a joke in episode 3". Words to that effect, anyhow!

As for Mrs Brown, I went from hating it, through to enjoying a couple of episodes, and back out the other side into thinking it pretty mindless. Its core content - man dressed as old woman for a main character, various family members who can't act very well, corpsing at everyone else's jokes, lots of "naughty" words - puts me in mind of a very amateur adult-oriented pantomime. Funny for 5 minutes if you've had a drink.
 

catseye

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I thought Hugh Grant was brilliant in The Gentleman. Chanelling Michael Caine for all he was worth, but it was an excellent turn.
 

Stormkhan

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He was playing 'to type' in The Lair of The White Worm, even before he had a type.
Posh voice aside, he just didn't look like an RAF pilot officer.
 

cycleboy2

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Yeah, they even had Charles Gray playing Crowley in all but name in one of them.
From Digital Spy about the Bergerac episode The Dig:

"A ratings-conquering show for the BBC in the 1980s, Bergerac headlined housewives' favourite John Nettles as a dogged but dull Jersey-based 'tec investigating everything from gangland murders to money-laundering to missing persons.

All pretty standard crime drama larks, but, once in a while, the show would properly wig out. It dipped its toe into horror waters a few times over the years, but 'The Dig', from series eight, was Bergerac at its most brazenly bizarre.

There's more than a touch of MR James in this eerie tale of archaeologists disturbing an ancient Viking warrior's tomb, even to the point of having Jim Bergerac being attacked by an invisible raven (no, really).

The series normally had some kind of stodgily rational explanation at the end of its horror episodes, but 'The Dig' sticks bravely to its supernatural guns. This kind of thing never happened in Midsomer Murders."
 
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