Just Plain Awful 'Comedy'

Souleater

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Personally I don't find canned applause objectionable in snooker. A fantastic shot deserves a round of appreciative applause which it would certainly get if a crowd were present. It's not comparable with canned laughter which can appear at even the slightest attempt at humour.

On football, you can generally watch a 'crowdless' version online if you prefer.
Who gets to decide if the shot deserves a clap though? Are they just going to press the clap button for evey half decent shot or only spectacular shots? I fear if the 'no specators' continues much longer it will become like canned laughter, where the canned clapping will sound after every shot :(
 

hunck

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Who gets to decide if the shot deserves a clap though? Are they just going to press the clap button for evey half decent shot or only spectacular shots? I fear if the 'no specators' continues much longer it will become like canned laughter, where the canned clapping will sound after every shot :(
I don't know who gets to press the button - presumably someone knowledgeable about the game who knows an exceptional shot when they see one. It's not been overused as far as I've seen.
 

stu neville

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It's an interesting read, because they were filmed in front of a live studio audience, and that audience would laugh at the serious stuff: sexual assault, child abuse, drug abuse, so it just looks terrible now.
It's screechingly ironic that the main culprit for this kind of episode was The Cosby Show.

Personally, I never found Cosby himself all that funny anyway: far too much reliance on his "looking baffled and slowly repeating what someone else said" schtick. All that said, some of the "making a point" episodes are mawkishly heavy-handed in the extreme, and then on top if that there's one where they have a barbecue and Cosby's character explains the sauce has a special ingredient "to get everyone in the mood." Isn't hindsight wonderful?
 

Victory

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In a really cringy that's so racist sort of way. Can't believe how far he actually went.
Can I ask, respectfully, your age?

I am late 40's.

So perhaps your view is through a more recent lens.

Because whilst I though the show was so lacking in humour or relevance that I only watched brief clips then decided there were better things to watch, I never found it racist.

Yes, the show featured grotesque caricature masks, but everyone got the treatment, regardless of race.

I am from a viewpoint were if a black actor wants to play a character who in history was white, or vice versa, or a gay actor wants to play a character who in history was straight, or vice versa...then it is no problem.
An actor's craft is to portray someone else.

(With the occasional exception where actors do play themselves or characters based on themselves i.e. Larry David in Curb Your Enthusiasm.)

I await with interest the mooted contemporary return of a comedy first written 17 years ago which dealt with race in a way quite at odds with the current mainstream sensitivities, The Chapelle Show; far more controversial than Bo Selecta, and very much funnier.
 
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escargot

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there's one where they have a barbecue and Cosby's character explains the sauce has a special ingredient "to get everyone in the mood." Isn't hindsight wonderful?
:chuckle:
 

GNC

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It's screechingly ironic that the main culprit for this kind of episode was The Cosby Show.

Personally, I never found Cosby himself all that funny anyway: far too much reliance on his "looking baffled and slowly repeating what someone else said" schtick. All that said, some of the "making a point" episodes are mawkishly heavy-handed in the extreme, and then on top if that there's one where they have a barbecue and Cosby's character explains the sauce has a special ingredient "to get everyone in the mood." Isn't hindsight wonderful?
In the 1980s Cosby released a concert movie as a "tasteful" answer to the bluer comedy of Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy. There's not one genuine laugh in it, it's the lamest observational shtick imaginable. Mind you, Eddie's stand up hasn't aged too well either, for different reasons.
 

Souleater

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Can I ask, respectfully, your age?

I am late 40's.

So perhaps your view is through a more recent lens.

Because whilst I though the show was so lacking in humour or relevance that I only watched brief clips then decided there were better things to watch, I never found it racist.

Yes, the show featured grotesque caricature masks, but everyone got the treatment, regardless of race.

I am from a viewpoint were if a black actor wants to play a character who in history was white, or vice versa, or a gay actor wants to play a character who in history was straight, or vice versa...then it is no problem.
An actor's craft is to portray someone else.

(With the occasional exception where actors do play themselves or characters based on themselves i.e. Larry David in Curb Your Enthusiasm.)

I await with interest the mooted contemporary return of a comedy first written 17 years ago which dealt with race in a way quite at odds with the current mainstream sensitivities, The Chapelle Show; far more controversial than Bo Selecta, and very much funnier.
I agree, Bo Selecta was more in to mocking celebrities from what they did in a brutal parody, Craig David aparently had a bit of a breakdown because of it, but other celebs such as Mel B embraced the parody actually appearing with Frances character of her, there was no racist intent or parodying of people due to thier race.
 

Mythopoeika

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I agree, Bo Selecta was more in to mocking celebrities from what they did in a brutal parody, Craig David aparently had a bit of a breakdown because of it, but other celebs such as Mel B embraced the parody actually appearing with Frances character of her, there was no racist intent or parodying of people due to thier race.
Actually, you could say it kept Craig David famous. He might have otherwise faded from public view.
 

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Swifty

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I agree, Bo Selecta was more in to mocking celebrities from what they did in a brutal parody, Craig David aparently had a bit of a breakdown because of it, but other celebs such as Mel B embraced the parody actually appearing with Frances character of her, there was no racist intent or parodying of people due to thier race.
Because lets face it, nothing makes people relax and so comfy to laugh more than an underlying current of racism accusation ..
 

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I remember liking M*A*S*H when it was first broadcast on UK TV, I never laughed out loud at it, it was warm observational comedy. I honestly can't remember if I saw the canned laughter episodes or the ones without that first but I can remember being shocked whichever way round that happened.
One of my favourite programmes - then an episode was shown without the laughter-track stripped out, which was my first inkling there had been one. The Channel Four Announcer actually apologised for the "technical fault" as the credits rolled. Immediate backlash amongst the UK viewers was the comment "is there a crying-track for the sad bits ?"
 

Souleater

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Ouch! I had no idea! Poor guy. :(
I'm glad he's reviving his career now.
Yeah it pretty much broke him, but as you say he is back and putting out new music, im not a fan but its not nice thinking about how a parody ruined someones career (albeit temporarily).
 

Victory

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Here's Bill Cosby warning kids about the dangers of drugs

download.jpg


 

Trevp666

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Bill Cosby really should have been warning them about the dangers of Bill Cosby.
 

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I remember liking M*A*S*H when it was first broadcast on UK TV, I never laughed out loud at it, it was warm observational comedy. I honestly can't remember if I saw the canned laughter episodes or the ones without that first but I can remember being shocked whichever way round that happened.
MASH was originally screened on British TV without canned laughter. I've seen it since with the canned laughter and it ruined it.
 

stu neville

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MASH was originally screened on British TV without canned laughter. I've seen it since with the canned laughter and it ruined it.
It’s true. M*A*S*H without the canned laugh is smart, funny and lets the tragedy of the situation show through.
I loved M*A*S*H when on BBC2, and never missed it. I never even noticed the lack of laughter until we went to the US, when it was on nightly, and it took me a couple of months to get used to the sudden added hilarity. It really does detract, though.
 

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I loved M*A*S*H when on BBC2, and never missed it. I never even noticed the lack of laughter until we went to the US, when it was on nightly, and it took me a couple of months to get used to the sudden added hilarity. It really does detract, though.
When it was shown on BBC2 there was no laugh track.
It was accidentally run with it one night and there were immediate complaints, including mine! :chuckle:

I believe it's on Sky or whatever now but I'm not interested. Tried it once, heard the canned laughter, switched off.
Shame as I really loved it without.
 

escargot

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It’s true. M*A*S*H without the canned laugh is smart, funny and lets the tragedy of the situation show through.
It's as if the show would be too dark without it, being heavily influenced by medical black humour.
 

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In the 1980s Cosby released a concert movie as a "tasteful" answer to the bluer comedy of Richard Pryor and Eddie Murphy. There's not one genuine laugh in it, it's the lamest observational shtick imaginable. Mind you, Eddie's stand up hasn't aged too well either, for different reasons.
I was never a fan, and didn't watch any of his TV shows. I had heard one of his early "live" albums (dunno if it was the same as your listening) and only three sketches amused me: one about getting ice cream when he'd had his tonsils out, one when he talked about kid's go-karts (US: push-carts) and one about Noah. They amused me but not uproariously so.
Now his crimes have come to light, I think there's a lot of looking for 'signs' when there aren't any. Case in point, his 'barbeque sauce' thing: at the time - and I think intended at the time - was the implication that he'd put some alcohol in it. Now, it's 'dark humour' to contend he'd drugged it. Sometimes, to use a phrase, a cigar is just a cigar. But we desire to look for 'warning signs' that were missed or misinterpreted, to give us that comfort of thinking "we know better now, so it couldn't happen again." A now-recognised paedophile may've said - in show or interview - "I love kids!" There's an assumption he was being smug, openly flaunting his perversion. There's no possibility he was just using a stock phrase or that it wasn't a "sign" of his proclivities.
 

escargot

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Case in point, his 'barbeque sauce' thing: at the time - and I think intended at the time - was the implication that he'd put some alcohol in it. Now, it's 'dark humour' to contend he'd drugged it. Sometimes, to use a phrase, a cigar is just a cigar. But we desire to look for 'warning signs' that were missed or misinterpreted, to give us that comfort of thinking "we know better now, so it couldn't happen again."
Assuming he wrote that joke himself, what it says to me was that he had the idea in his mind to adulterate refreshments for his own ends.

Same with the 'I love kids!' comment. It'd be valid to see that as a veiled admission because his declared 'love' of children was how he gained access tot hem.
 

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"Adulterate refreshments for their own ends"? Like when some folks think it's funny to spike non-alcoholic punches with spirits? Which is misguided humour? Like when folks joke about cooking hashish cakes which are eaten by elderly relatives - they obviously intended to drug them for ... unspecified nefarious purposes?
But "I love kids!" could also mean that, when accused of abuse, it's a denial that they'd harm children. The word and phrase isn't always sexual. It can be interpreted as sexual, but that depends on the motives of those who seek out and question such speech.
I reiterate - there's a danger of placing interpretation on incidents and speech that is coloured by hindsight.
 

escargot

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"Adulterate refreshments for their own ends"? Like when some folks think it's funny to spike non-alcoholic punches with spirits? Which is misguided humour? Like when folks joke about cooking hashish cakes which are eaten by elderly relatives - they obviously intended to drug them for ... unspecified nefarious purposes?
I didn't say it was funny. In the context of the Cosby show it was intended to be. It wouldn't amuse me. But it's no coincidence.

But "I love kids!" could also mean that, when accused of abuse, it's a denial that they'd harm children. The word and phrase isn't always sexual. It can be interpreted as sexual, but that depends on the motives of those who seek out and question such speech.
My point was that a claim to 'love' children is how a pervert might gain access to them in the first place.

However, as a parent that would ring alarm bells with me from the start.

Remember, Michael Jackson loved children. Everybody knew that.
 

Trevp666

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Except for the phrase "I love kids....but I couldn't eat a whole one"
 
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