Kelly / Hopkinsville (Kentucky) 'Goblins' Incident (1955)

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
6,160
Reaction score
11,028
Points
299
We have this thread and they thread for the goblins being back. Can they be merged?
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
Staff member
Joined
Jul 19, 2004
Messages
24,837
Reaction score
38,038
Points
314
Location
Out of Bounds
pages not found.:dpoo:

The articles cited are only accessible as archived items at the Wayback Machine. See the alternative links already posted earlier.
 
Last edited:

marhawkman

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
777
Reaction score
869
Points
99
As you said the owls are solitary, which does not match the account of the golbins numbers.
That's something I'm wondering about. How many were seen at once? most accounts I've read seem to suggest it appeared, then left, then came back.
 

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
6,160
Reaction score
11,028
Points
299
That's something I'm wondering about. How many were seen at once? most accounts I've read seem to suggest it appeared, then left, then came back.
At least two were seen at once. At one point in the encounter there is one on the roof and one in a nearby tree. While the Wikipedia article states they claim to have seen 12-15, I haven't seen a report indicating that they saw that many at the same time, so you have to account for the possibility that they saw the same creature at different times. They were also seen at close range.

So it would have to be at least two owls, and the owls are solitary. It could have been a breeding pair, but they breed in January, and the encounter was in August.

One claim is that the farmers weren't familiar with the owls because the owl species had not been seen in the area for at least 20 years. Of course that also means that it's unlikely the creatures were owls, because the owls had not been seen in the area for 20 years...

As for the 'they were Kentucky hillbilly levels of drunk', there is no evidence they were drunk. The woman who lived there did not allow drinking in the house. Also the people who went to the police received at least a cursory physical exam, as the police investigator noted the high heart rate of one person who reported the issue, but no indication they were "drunk as a skunk".

And the visible green glow in the forest being foxfire? Foxfire is not very bright at all.

So while owls are certainly more likely than goblins from space, they don't seem to be a very good match either.
 

MrRING

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Messages
5,279
Reaction score
1,731
Points
234
A few thoughts:

My Dad grew up in Harlan County Kentucky, and according to him there were very few small game animals around because people would shoot and eat just about anything they could. Most people were hunters and good shots. I don't think they would have been too perplexed by, nor would they have had a more elaborate explanation for owls if that is what they were.

The story about ET & the goblins. ET is based on the goblins, but Close Encounters is not. It was a separate project after CEOTTK, and I believe the title was Dark Skies. The plot was supposed to follow the the cruel goblins night of destruction, but there was going to be one curious and gentle goblin unlike the rest who befriended and helped some kids during the assault. The screenwriter lost interest in the horror angle, but was interested in the friendly alien storyline, and got permission to work on that... and it became ET.
 

sherbetbizarre

Special Branch
Joined
Sep 4, 2004
Messages
4,666
Reaction score
6,476
Points
239
The story about ET & the goblins. ET is based on the goblins, but Close Encounters is not. It was a separate project after CEOTTK, and I believe the title was Dark Skies. The plot was supposed to follow the the cruel goblins night of destruction, but there was going to be one curious and gentle goblin unlike the rest who befriended and helped some kids during the assault. The screenwriter lost interest in the horror angle, but was interested in the friendly alien storyline, and got permission to work on that... and it became ET.
It was actually Spielberg who lost interest in an "evil" alien pic, and went for E.T. instead... Special Effects wiz Rick Baker - who already designed and built these elaborate aliens - went ballistic when he heard the news!

sg_rick_baker-final.jpg


https://zachseemayer.com/2014/05/27/rick-baker-finally-reveals-night-skies-aliens/
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
Joined
Aug 9, 2001
Messages
9,243
Reaction score
21,104
Points
334
I can remember reading about this case back in the Sixties, in a UFO magazine that I bought on a day out in London. It fascinated the teenage me.

The impression that I got then was that the locus was some out-of-the-way shack ten miles up a dirt road in hilly, wooded terrain. It appears that I was wrong: I've done a little research, and this is my best guess as to the location of the Sutton farm:

Kelly-Hopkinsville-UFO-Fortean03.jpg


It's near the second "41" north of Hopkinsville, near the centre of the image.

Here is (again my best guess) at the locus on Google Earth:

Kelly-Hopkinsville-UFO-Fortean01.jpg


And finally, a Google Street View of the scene:

Hopkinsville-UFO-Fortean02.jpg


I believe it would be near the site of the grey building to the upper right.

So: I believe that the locus was near a main road, and at a point where a railway line diverges from parallelling said main road. Roads and railway lines both add intriguing possibilities for light sources, strange noises and people in unusual clothing...

maximus otter
 

MrRING

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2002
Messages
5,279
Reaction score
1,731
Points
234
Night Skies was indeed the right name, and I hadn't seen that alien critter design work! You'll see from this article that it was the shared relationship between Spielberg and Melissa Mathison that led Night Skies to become E.T.

https://www.denofgeek.com/movies/how-steven-spielbergs-night-skies-became-et/
It was the Hopkinsville encounter that became Spielberg’s inspiration for what he first called Watch The Skies (an early title, referencing The Thing From Another World, which he’d also initially applied to Close Encounters). There was, however, a problem: the family involved in the Hopkinsville encounter didn’t want a movie made about them, so Spielberg and his collaborator, production designer Ron Cobb (more on him later) were forced to fictionalize the story as much as they could in order to avoid a potential lawsuit.
The plot:
A spate of cattle mutilations and UFO sightings marks the arrival of the aliens, which, as described by Sayles, are close to the ones in the Hopkinsville account: three feet high, “eyes like grasshoppers.” Interestingly, Sayles also makes each of the five alien visitors distinct, even going so far as giving them names. There’s Hoodoo, who appears to have hypnotic powers. A pair of mischievous creatures named Klud and Squirt, a young, wide-eyed alien named Buddee, and the scariest member of their group, Skar, who can mutilate with a touch of his long, bony fingers.
And how it changed:
One of the visitors to the set of Raiders was Harrison’s girlfriend and future wife, The Black Stallion screenwriter Melissa Mathison. Spielberg began reading Mathison the Night Skies script, and both agreed that the most affecting part of it was in its scenes between the young alien and a young boy. Mathison even admitted that the notion of a friendship between a boy and an alien moved her to tears, and Spielberg, who’d been planning to make a more personal, autobiographical movie for several years, immediately saw the value in this plot strand – so much so that he wanted to direct it himself.

Taking the final scene from Sayles’ script – where the young alien Buddee is left stranded on Earth by his own kind – Mathison set to work on a draft of what she called E.T. And Me, and completed a draft of the script in just eight weeks.

Re: The Map of Hopkinsville: that could be the place, but remember that many years of upgrades would have happened between then and now that would have likely reduced trees and added roads and new houses. My Dad's family left Kentucky in the 60's and got a trailer near a river in eastern Tennessee. As a kid in the 70's and 80's, it was a rural a place as you could imagine, and there were few homes, mostly trailers. in the 2000's, the scenic views and cheap land prices led to a flurry of mansions built all around, so much so that you'd never believe how rural it was just years before.
 

kamalktk

Antediluvian
Joined
Feb 5, 2011
Messages
6,160
Reaction score
11,028
Points
299
I can remember reading about this case back in the Sixties, in a UFO magazine that I bought on a day out in London. It fascinated the teenage me.

The impression that I got then was that the locus was some out-of-the-way shack ten miles up a dirt road in hilly, wooded terrain. It appears that I was wrong: I've done a little research, and this is my best guess as to the location of the Sutton farm:


So: I believe that the locus was near a main road, and at a point where a railway line diverges from parallelling said main road. Roads and railway lines both add intriguing possibilities for light sources, strange noises and people in unusual clothing...

maximus otter
I had that impression as well, way out in the middle of nowhere. I just checked and highway 41 was built in 1926, so it was there at the time. The railways also seem to have been there for a long time. Neither was new at the time, so presumably the family was used to trains and traffic associated to the road. Hopkinsville also has maps available online that go back to the 1890's. I suppose you'd have to add train personnel or someone riding the rails and hopping off there at the farm to the list of possibilities, though neither seems a good match.
 

Sharon Hill

Complicated biological machine
Joined
Dec 16, 2014
Messages
996
Reaction score
2,018
Points
144
Location
Pennsylvania, USA
I can remember reading about this case back in the Sixties, in a UFO magazine that I bought on a day out in London. It fascinated the teenage me.

The impression that I got then was that the locus was some out-of-the-way shack ten miles up a dirt road in hilly, wooded terrain. It appears that I was wrong: I've done a little research, and this is my best guess as to the location of the Sutton farm:

Kelly-Hopkinsville-UFO-Fortean03.jpg


It's near the second "41" north of Hopkinsville, near the centre of the image.

Here is (again my best guess) at the locus on Google Earth:

Kelly-Hopkinsville-UFO-Fortean01.jpg


And finally, a Google Street View of the scene:

Hopkinsville-UFO-Fortean02.jpg


I believe it would be near the site of the grey building to the upper right.

So: I believe that the locus was near a main road, and at a point where a railway line diverges from parallelling said main road. Roads and railway lines both add intriguing possibilities for light sources, strange noises and people in unusual clothing...

maximus otter
I can't tell from the google earth photo where Rt 68 crosses. Here is the map from the CUFOS report I linked to above. But it is very near to railroad tracks.

Screen Shot 2020-08-11 at 11.06.36 AM.png
 

marhawkman

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
777
Reaction score
869
Points
99
the google earth shot is way north of 68.
Kelly-Hopkinsville-UFO-Fortean03e.png


The google earth part is marked with a purple box, and Sharon Hill's map in the pink box.
 

marhawkman

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
777
Reaction score
869
Points
99
There have been subsequent examples of the "Kentucky Goblins" showing up. While I haven't had time to research this myself, Bedtime Stories has covered it:
Kentucky Goblins II: The Return
Saw that a while back, it's a weird one, no verifiable anything. It had weird details that made no sense though. In the end it seemed like the most logical conclusion is that the guy(Newkirk) filming the Hellier documentary made it all up as a PR stunt.

Weirdest part and the part that made least sense was claiming to have been contacted by Terry Wriste.(skip to around 23:10 in the vid) It's a pseudonym used by a guy giving an interview to a guy writing a book mixing cabbalistic occult stuff with aliens. Yeah you wanna get really confused really fast? try making sense of that crap. That book(which Newkirk talks about) makes it clear that Terry Wriste isn't anyone's real name. But Dr. Christie knows a guy who knew how to contact Wriste, and Wriste then recommends that Christie call Newkirk? Wut? Why? How?

Because I was curious I actually found a digital copy of Greenfield's book and read the interview with "Wriste". (It's easy to find.) It's an over-the-top mystery man who is hypercompetent and has extraterrestrials as friends(including Indrid Cold) and learned some of his superior skills from them. (seriously, one of these tricks is how to use crystalline lattices as a substitute for projection slides, one such crystalline lattice had a secret map of Grey bases) Interestingly, Greenfield claims to have visited Brown Mountain in his conversation with "Wriste". The same place Newkirk visited looking for an alien base. Also his advice was to basically stay away from hidden bases. Part of the interview in Greenfield's book was discussing how dangerous the Greys are and how Wriste has fought them in a physical way but recommends that lesser men(IE anyone with no military training or weapons, or understanding of Grey tech) stay the heck away from them('cause the Greys might kill you or worse, Wriste claimed some of his friends died that way). Yet in the Hellier case that guy tries to get Newkirk to try to break into one of the Grey bases armed with no information other than the location, and no weapons more powerful than a video camera? Based on the description of Grey bases in Greenfield's book that sounds like suicide. Which is extra weird because Newkirk talked about reading Greenfield's book.

Another thing is that the Kelly case has a very unique description of the aliens, and the Hellier case is typical greys. Dr. Christie's daughter claimed these greys were literally walking around naked with no anything. I saw one person speculate the Kelly case might have been space suits... um sure, maybe.
 

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
46,763
Reaction score
41,782
Points
334
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Because I was curious I actually found a digital copy of Greenfield's book and read the interview with "Wriste". (It's easy to find.) It's an over-the-top mystery man who is hypercompetent and has extraterrestrials as friends(including Indrid Cold) and learned some of his superior skills from them. (seriously, one of these tricks is how to use crystalline lattices as a substitute for projection slides, one such crystalline lattice had a secret map of Grey bases) Interestingly, Greenfield claims to have visited Brown Mountain in his conversation with "Wriste". The same place Newkirk visited looking for an alien base. Also his advice was to basically stay away from hidden bases. Part of the interview in Greenfield's book was discussing how dangerous the Greys are and how Wriste has fought them in a physical way but recommends that lesser men(IE anyone with no military training or weapons, or understanding of Grey tech) stay the heck away from them('cause the Greys might kill you or worse, Wriste claimed some of his friends died that way). Yet in the Hellier case that guy tries to get Newkirk to try to break into one of the Grey bases armed with no information other than the location, and no weapons more powerful than a video camera? Based on the description of Grey bases in Greenfield's book that sounds like suicide. Which is extra weird because Newkirk talked about reading Greenfield's book.
Sounds a bit like the Phil Schneider/Dulce Base happening.

For more about Phil Schneider see:
Phil Schneider
https://forums.forteana.org/index.php?threads/phil-schneider.30683/

For more about Dulce see:
Underground Alien Bases
https://forums.forteana.org/index.php?threads/underground-alien-bases.743/
 
Last edited by a moderator:

marhawkman

Abominable Snowman
Joined
Nov 2, 2019
Messages
777
Reaction score
869
Points
99
Sounds a bit like the Phil Schneider/Dulce Base happening.
Greenfield's book seems to point in the general direction of Men in Black as Grey supporters. Also the interview names Archuleta as the location of a presumed joint base. But it wasn't a place Wriste claimed to have been inside. Greenfield claimed to have been in the area looking around, but not inside it either. (It's a weird read) It makes me curious about this "Shaver" guy. Both claimed to have gotten large amounts of information from him.
 
Last edited by a moderator:

Comfortably Numb

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
8,464
Reaction score
13,574
Points
284
Location
Phone
Whilst I most certainly have heard of the case, it's been so long since and I've really enjoyed briefly researching a recap.

Wikipedia directly links to a local newspaper report from the 'Kentucky New Era', which seems instrumental, being hugely detailed and published next morning.

https://news.google.com/newspapers?id=HeYrAAAAIBAJ&sjid=qmUFAAAAIBAJ&pg=2838,3341366

Having gone over this article many times, it eventually seems clear there is one obvious explanation.

Cletus made a killer batch of moonshine...

You can picture the scene...

'Brandine, think I saw one of them doggone spaceships just landin' in the yard - best tell the others and get the guns'...

[Subsequently...]

'There's one over there! In the shadows! Fire!'...

'Hell, looks like there's another one climbed on the roof... Shoot!... Yeehaw!!!'.

On a more sensible note, the Wikipedia account explains many reasons why the case can hardly be taken seriously as evidence of a gunfight encounter with ET travellers.

Although, in 1955 it clearly seemed plausible and as for what genuinely occurred overall... personally content to leave as unsolved - a quite mad tale deserving of same and I would so recommend reading that original newspaper account. :) :eek:
 

Kondoru

Antediluvian
Joined
Dec 5, 2003
Messages
8,300
Reaction score
3,749
Points
239
Marhawkman; that is so terribly matter of fact.
 

Comfortably Numb

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
8,464
Reaction score
13,574
Points
284
Location
Phone
I have just come across this short documentary about the case...
Have to choose my words very carefully here.

Watching this documentary, the description of there being some 12-15 of the creatures at one point and that some climbed onto the roof, reminded of a similar encounter I have came across, where the creatures involved were generally no more than curious (the Sutton case video mentioning the entities therein also initially seemed to be similarly so), however, could become aggressive if they felt threatened.

Size of the creatures I was reminded of, is circa feet in length, although some will grow larger.

Similarity to the Sutton descriptions...

The available sketches date from some time afterwards, so that's not ideal.

Going by descriptions, it seems the Sutton entities were perceived to be - keeping in mind this was at night - some 3ft tall, with an 'oversized' head, round-faced with long arms and talons.

Also, they appeared to have 'oversized' eyes with a 'yellowish glow and their bodies seemed to 'shimmer' in the moonlight.

The creatures in the incident I was reminded of are, as noted, smaller, however, they do have arms and talons... and also ears.

Are there any of them in Kentucky?

I had absolutely no idea and hence just discovered not only are they indigenous, there is now a rescue center for them in Hopkinsville itself.

All merely observations.

Do they have glowing yellow eyes at night?

Oh yes, that they most certainly do...


fuckyou_resize_71.jpg
 

WeirdExeter

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Jan 9, 2012
Messages
269
Reaction score
809
Points
99
Saw that a while back, it's a weird one, no verifiable anything. It had weird details that made no sense though. In the end it seemed like the most logical conclusion is that the guy(Newkirk) filming the Hellier documentary made it all up as a PR stunt.

Weirdest part and the part that made least sense was claiming to have been contacted by Terry Wriste.(skip to around 23:10 in the vid) It's a pseudonym used by a guy giving an interview to a guy writing a book mixing cabbalistic occult stuff with aliens. Yeah you wanna get really confused really fast? try making sense of that crap. That book(which Newkirk talks about) makes it clear that Terry Wriste isn't anyone's real name. But Dr. Christie knows a guy who knew how to contact Wriste, and Wriste then recommends that Christie call Newkirk? Wut? Why? How?

Because I was curious I actually found a digital copy of Greenfield's book and read the interview with "Wriste". (It's easy to find.) It's an over-the-top mystery man who is hypercompetent and has extraterrestrials as friends(including Indrid Cold) and learned some of his superior skills from them. (seriously, one of these tricks is how to use crystalline lattices as a substitute for projection slides, one such crystalline lattice had a secret map of Grey bases) Interestingly, Greenfield claims to have visited Brown Mountain in his conversation with "Wriste". The same place Newkirk visited looking for an alien base. Also his advice was to basically stay away from hidden bases. Part of the interview in Greenfield's book was discussing how dangerous the Greys are and how Wriste has fought them in a physical way but recommends that lesser men(IE anyone with no military training or weapons, or understanding of Grey tech) stay the heck away from them('cause the Greys might kill you or worse, Wriste claimed some of his friends died that way). Yet in the Hellier case that guy tries to get Newkirk to try to break into one of the Grey bases armed with no information other than the location, and no weapons more powerful than a video camera? Based on the description of Grey bases in Greenfield's book that sounds like suicide. Which is extra weird because Newkirk talked about reading Greenfield's book.

Another thing is that the Kelly case has a very unique description of the aliens, and the Hellier case is typical greys. Dr. Christie's daughter claimed these greys were literally walking around naked with no anything. I saw one person speculate the Kelly case might have been space suits... um sure, maybe.

Really insightful, thanks.

I didn't dislike Hellier as a) it was free to watch on YT, b) I live in the UK and who has only ever visited the US East Coast, so was pretty interesting to see what that part of the US looks and feels like. So it wasn't wasted time but despite the characters being quite likeable the whole investigation was pretty ropey. The most absurd bit was the daughter of the writer who sat there and said she gets visits from the alien crew on her anniversaries... I think she's a bit lonely, bless. Furthermore, I live in Cornwall, UK and I could sit in my garden at night and get the same night noises they were interpreting as space goblins sneaking up on them *sigh*.
 

Comfortably Numb

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
8,464
Reaction score
13,574
Points
284
Location
Phone
Our spaceship landing seems to coincide with a separate meteor observation and I was wondering if that might have been documented.

Although we have detailed astronomical records going back some years... would they conceivably exist from that long ago?

These are early sketches I have discovered and never seen before now:

newspaper-illustrations-of-hopkinsville-gobline_compress63.jpg

The one at the top right is interesting, if indeed based on a witness testimony.

So, the creatures could run on all fours as well?

In addition to accounts of their 'glowing yellow eyes' and 'silverly' appearance, we seem to have a conflict of evidence as to whether the bullets were ineffective, or, when fired upon, the shots missed and our creatures sought refuge by jumping up into trees.

Reading the dramatic tales of our 'four hour battle... did the creatures actually ever fight back!

We have the apparent hair-grabbing incident and...

... that's it.

Just musing again, although this, if based on witness testimony, is something which doesn't seem to have been revealed in any published accounts.

A floating alien, this is not...

newspaper-illustrations-of-hopkinsville-gobline.jpg
 
Last edited:

stu neville

Commissioner.
Staff member
Joined
Mar 9, 2002
Messages
12,807
Reaction score
7,271
Points
314
Having gone over this article many times, it eventually seems clear there is one obvious explanation.

Cletus made a killer batch of moonshine...
This one gets trotted out a lot. Whilst the area, and the personnel may well have had 'shine connections, was everybody drunk (including the children)? As for the raccoons, see also owls - that's been suggested. No, I think there may be something else happening.

We re-watched Shyamalan's "Signs" the other night, which of course owes a significant debt to Hopkinsville.

It did set me thinking, however: take away the "alien" element and there is a very noticeable pattern here in common with other, particularly rural US paranormal reports involving attacks on homesteads. See also the reported Bigfoot encounters with Fred Beck, with the Chapmans at Ruby Creek, and more recently the alleged Honobia attacks - these all follow the same basic pattern, it's only really the reported protagonists that change. Maybe we're looking at a distinct phenomenon with differing interpretations?
 

Comfortably Numb

Antediluvian
Joined
Aug 7, 2018
Messages
8,464
Reaction score
13,574
Points
284
Location
Phone
No, I think there may be something else happening.
The quote you mention is from way back, when statedly just having some fun about how bizarre the case was. In all seriousness, I am aware that apparently alcohol wasn't even permitted in the household.

The extraordinarily and seemingly quite inexplicable nature of our story remained my view and so happened the case come up on another UFO related thread this morning.

I referenced my post here regarding a link to the newspapers article and simply wondered afterwards if there might be an early interview with the witnesses, now available on YouTube.

What I did find was the video posted and it was a remark therein which distinctly caught my attention - the fact there were some 12-14 creatures involved. I didn't realise there were quite so many and was instantly reminded of a non UFO related incident I read about a couple of years back.

This was about an encounter with a similar sized pack of raccoons who had besieged a house in the U.S., in search of food.

Naturally intrigued, the question was... are their raccoons in Kentucky and is there anything is the Hopkinsville case evidence which suggests that might conceivably be an explanation.

The outcome, as highlighted, was a complete surprise and revelation.

It might have previously been suggested as a candidate, however, has it ever been evidence before and moreso to this extent?

If that sketch indicating the creatures could also move on four legs and dating from only days afterwards is based on witness testimony, at what point do we have one coincidence too many...?

Screenshot_20210723-174505.jpg


Your other points are pretty fundamental and I will address them separately in due course.

Be seeing you... :)

 

Austin Popper

Emperor of Antarctica
Joined
Aug 13, 2017
Messages
1,261
Reaction score
2,877
Points
159
Location
Colorado, where the gold is still elusive
People who live in the sticks in Kentucky are very familiar with raccoons. Duh.
 
Top