Kids Today

Mythopoeika

I am a meat popsicle
Joined
Sep 18, 2001
Messages
36,879
Likes
23,661
Points
309
Location
Inside a starship, watching puny humans from afar
Somebody told me the other day that his 16 year old daughter didn't know how to tell the time using a clock with hands. He then went on to qualify that statement further, by saying "well she CAN tell the time using a clock, but has to stand and study it first". I was horrified!!!!! Mobile phones have a lot to answer for!
I must confess that, having used digital timepieces for so long, I now have to stop and stare at a traditional clock to make any sense of it. Appalling, I know.
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
26,901
Likes
27,989
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
Far out in the uncharted backwaters of the unfashionable end of the western spiral arm of the Galaxy lies a small unregarded yellow sun. Orbiting this at a distance of roughly ninety-two million miles is an utterly insignificant little blue green planet whose ape-descended life forms are so amazingly primitive that they still think digital watches are a pretty neat idea.
 

MetroGnome

Devoted Cultist
Joined
Jun 29, 2017
Messages
162
Likes
212
Points
44
Somebody told me the other day that his 16 year old daughter didn't know how to tell the time using a clock with hands. He then went on to qualify that statement further, by saying "well she CAN tell the time using a clock, but has to stand and study it first". I was horrified!!!!! Mobile phones have a lot to answer for!
Yeah, this inability to read analog clocks is pretty widespread among kids today. :)
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
I assume they don't wear watches then. Funny thing is that most watches still have hands on. There are more of them around than digital ones. Who are they selling them to? Folk over 45?
 
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
8,865
Likes
10,786
Points
279
I assume they don't wear watches then. Funny thing is that most watches still have hands on. There are more of them around than digital ones. Who are they selling them to? Folk over 45?
I almost never wear a watch now, and I'm over 45...'a bit'. I only posses one watch, a rather nice Seiko I bought about 16 years ago when somebody paid me a lot of commission. We had hours of fun winding up the MD by talking about how much I'd paid for it, we talked about £600, which really bothered him as he liked to have the most expensive stuff, but it was a LOT less than that, I can tell you. Anyone who thinks I might pay £600 for a mere watch doesn't know me very well...

It has hands but is 'auto winding', if you leave it sat still for a day, it stops the hands to conserve energy and when you pick it up whizzes them around to the right time, which always amuses me. With clocks on the phone, the car, the PC and so on, I just don't need it, so stopped wearing it. The phone goes in a stand at night and the clock face displayed is set to analogue...
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
Sounds like a nifty watch!! Funny thing is though, that if you click on the time at the bottom of the computer screen, it pops up with an analogue clock, or I suppose a digital version of an analogue clock. So they must still be used by somebody. I feel naked if I haven't got a watch on. I couldn't do with having to fish in my handbag for my phone every time I wanted to know what time it was. That would drive me mad!
And I'm WELL over 45 which is probably why I still like watches!
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
25,604
Likes
31,548
Points
284
I've experienced a bit of this in recent years, primarily in my previous work in schoolbook publishing. As an editor, I was told by publishers that "kids don't know what a 'barber' is [wtf?] so we can't use that word" or "kids don't want to see pictures of old stuff". It was maddening. I know that my young relatives are indeed interested in the past, and I certainly was when I was young (and still am). That said, I've actually had seemingly intelligent young adults say things to me like, "Why should I know about World War II. I wasn't born then" (as if *I* had been born then. Cheeeeesh!)
The Mrs asked me to come into her workplace to help out a couple of weeks back, I found myself working with a nice enough 20 or so year old when he came out with "****** says you used to be a groupie for The Beastie Boys!!" .. me : "Erm .. I was once a roadie for The Beastie Boys ... a groupie is someone who has sex with the band." him : "Oh!, OK .. well you've lived a life!." me "Hang on, I'm still living one!" ... the whole exchange was friendlier than I'm making it sound ... he spent the rest of the evening grilling me about raves I'd been to before he was born and stuff so I did feel obliged to give him the routine 'drugs are bad mmmkay' advice .. and I wear a white cheap CASIO watch.
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
The Mrs asked me to come into her workplace to help out a couple of weeks back, I found myself working with a nice enough 20 or so year old when he came out with "****** says you used to be a groupie for The Beastie Boys!!" .. me : "Erm .. I was once a roadie for The Beastie Boys ... a groupie is someone who has sex with the band." him : "Oh!, OK .. well you've lived a life!." me "Hang on, I'm still living one!" ... the whole exchange was friendlier than I'm making it sound ... he spent the rest of the evening grilling me about raves I'd been to before he was born and stuff so I did feel obliged to give him the routine 'drugs are bad mmmkay' advice .. and I wear a white cheap CASIO watch.
Well that's another thing isn't it? Music these days isn't what it was! (I'm sounding like a grumpy old git aren't I?). How many of today's musicians will still be rocking in their 70's like the Stones?????? Today's lot are legends in their own lunchtime!
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
25,604
Likes
31,548
Points
284
Well that's another thing isn't it? Music these days isn't what it was! (I'm sounding like a grumpy old git aren't I?). How many of today's musicians will still be rocking in their 70's like the Stones?????? Today's lot are legends in their own lunchtime!
I hope Green Day and The Prodigy are still going into their 70's to name two bands with hopefully lasting talent huddsy, I struggle to name many more though ..
 

escargot

Disciple of Marduk
Joined
Aug 24, 2001
Messages
26,445
Likes
23,571
Points
309
Location
HM The Tower of London
I taught all my kids to read the time on a 'hands' clock before they started school, because I hadn't mastered it at 11 when I went to secondary school. We must've been taught it but It hadn't 'stuck' with me. Possibly, I think, because I was horrifically shortsighted and couldn't see what was going on and partly because numbers are not my friends.
 

Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
Joined
Sep 15, 2013
Messages
25,604
Likes
31,548
Points
284
I taught all my kids to read the time on a 'hands' clock before they started school, because I hadn't mastered it at 11 when I went to secondary school. We must've been taught it but It hadn't 'stuck' with me. Possibly, I think, because I was horrifically shortsighted and couldn't see what was going on and partly because numbers are not my friends.
The last bar I worked in had one of those annoying 'comedy' anti clockwise clocks on the wall ... I can tell the time old school style and count but I'm also not a fan of numbers .. or salad now I think about it but I do both ..

 
Joined
Jul 31, 2005
Messages
5,815
Likes
7,544
Points
294
I taught all my kids to read the time on a 'hands' clock before they started school, because I hadn't mastered it at 11 when I went to secondary school.
One day at primary school we had to make our own clocks from a paper plate. I wasn't listening when the teacher explained how to mark off the 12, 3, 6 and 9 at quarters around the clock face so I got a massive bollocking for having the 6 o'clock mark at around 4 and the 12 at around 9. Leaving a space of about 4 hours unmarked and unaccounted for.

She was a poor teacher, prone to fits of rage. Probably dead now. Time is an illusion anyway.
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
Oh heck! This sounds like we're heading in the direction of discussing the space-time continuum! Don't ask me about that. I get baffled listening to science these days and I did well in science at school. But that was a loooooooong time ago and its all moved on since then. In any case, you need a way to measure the illusion and the best way is with hands on a clock!
 

poozler

Ephemeral Spectre
Joined
Mar 29, 2005
Messages
309
Likes
200
Points
59
I was surprised when, on a reddit, I encountered someone who declared that a particular piece of 'old-fashioned' (from the 1960s) cursive script was unintelligible and asked for help deciphering the writing. This person, judging by the writing style, seemed intelligent and an adult, and I expected some bizarre cryptic penmanship style, or perhaps terrible writing like my own, maybe even something in code. When I checked out the writing in question, I saw beautiful standard handwriting that was very readable. I was kind of shocked.
 

Ulalume

tart of darkness
Joined
Jan 3, 2009
Messages
3,223
Likes
6,185
Points
219
Location
Tejas
One day at primary school we had to make our own clocks from a paper plate. I wasn't listening when the teacher explained how to mark off the 12, 3, 6 and 9 at quarters around the clock face so I got a massive bollocking for having the 6 o'clock mark at around 4 and the 12 at around 9. Leaving a space of about 4 hours unmarked and unaccounted for.

She was a poor teacher, prone to fits of rage. Probably dead now.
I know how it is, about the teachers. And reading a clock isn't all that easy, anyway. What finally got it through to me (about age 6) was my brother - being a film student at the time - put me to work making his time lapse films. He didn't want to do the boring work of standing there clicking the shutter every few seconds, so he had me do it instead. :rolleyes: But that's what finally made me understand the clock.

Time is an illusion anyway.
That's what I tell myself every birthday.
 

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
26,901
Likes
27,989
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
I'm not concerned about a decline in 'intelligence' among the youngest generations, mainly because I don't think there is one, and mainly because a good deal of what is thought to be intelligence by the general public is nothing of the sort.

What concerns me, and what I do believe we are seeing, is a decline in curiosity--more specifically a decline in the desire to look beyond the walls of one's own life.

And it can hardly be a surprise when the rest of society is going in the same direction.

Geography is the shocker for me--although history is pretty bad: a decline in interest about the particulars of the planet we live on? And the lives of every person who lived before now?

If you've seen thousands of clocks in thousands of locations and have written them off as an old fashioned idea you don't need to concern yourself with, then there's a problem.
 
Last edited:

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
I was surprised when, on a reddit, I encountered someone who declared that a particular piece of 'old-fashioned' (from the 1960s) cursive script was unintelligible and asked for help deciphering the writing. This person, judging by the writing style, seemed intelligent and an adult, and I expected some bizarre cryptic penmanship style, or perhaps terrible writing like my own, maybe even something in code. When I checked out the writing in question, I saw beautiful standard handwriting that was very readable. I was kind of shocked.
Maybe its a bit like us having to read handwriting from 200 years ago. I enjoy doing family history and old wills can be fascinating but I struggle to read them. Eventually after practice you get an eye for it, and it all becomes much easier, but to begin with it seems impossible. Maybe this is what more recent handwriting looks like to today's youngsters!
 

Attachments

Yithian

Parish Watch
Staff member
Joined
Oct 29, 2002
Messages
26,901
Likes
27,989
Points
309
Location
East of Suez
I transcribed a chunk of a handwritten 1944 war diary for an artillery regiment last year and it really was hard going, but with constant comparisons and context I got three months down to fewer that six unknown words.

But the point isn't that it's hard to make out, but the idea that you could not possibly expect to be able to figure it out: lack of curiosity.
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
Wonder where this lack of curiosity comes from? Is it a by product of an electronic age where there is an app to do everything - or is it lack of parental interest in teaching anything? I know this is a generalisation and I'm sure there are lots of youngsters out there who can read clocks and handwriting and a host of other tasks too - but for the ones who can't do these things and lack the curiosity to try, how has this situation emerged? Babies are born naturally curious so what stems that urge?
 

henry

still speeding
Joined
Oct 23, 2005
Messages
3,874
Likes
1,104
Points
0
i dont think its lack of curiosity as much as expectation of immediacy ...we used to wait a week between episodes of the professionals, today everything is on demand (equals, we re going to ram it down your throat until it means nothing anyway) ... i only found out a week ago that if you pay for spotify you literally have access to all recorded music !

someone tell me ive been misinformed ...
 
Joined
Jun 27, 2015
Messages
8,865
Likes
10,786
Points
279
I'm not concerned about a decline in 'intelligence' among the youngest generations, mainly because I don't think there is one, and mainly because a good deal of what is thought to be intelligence by the general public is nothing of the sort.

What concerns me, and what I do believe we are seeing, is a decline in curiosity--more specificically a decline in the desire to look beyond the walls of one's own life.

And it can hardly be a surprise when the rest of society is going in the same direction.

Geography is the shocker for me--although history is pretty bad: a decline in interest about the particulars of the planet we live on? And the lives of every person who lived before now?
I agree, curiosity matters, the pleasure of finding something out for it's own sake, rather than a point-in-time need, which is served (for many) by the google strapped to your psyche. A 'young' on my recent academic humanties foray said to me; "How do you know so much stuff?"

But there really could be a problem coming and here's why:

It is axiomatic that IQ is pretty heavily influenced by your parents' so a decline in IQ is unlikely. However, intelligence (i.e IQ) is generally considered to separated into fluid intelligence 'Gf', that is, the ability to solve new or novel problems without acquired knowledge and crystallised intelligence 'Gc', is the ability to solve problems based on already acquired knowledge.

As one ages, the former declines and the latter increases, so one's IQ remains fairly constant until some kind of age related cognitive decline sets in.

Gf starts to decline quite early in life as it happens. It can happen at 35, but you or no-one else might notice as you've learnt so much stuff. Most academic's best works come before they are 35, there's a reason for that.

If we have a generation of people who don't care to learn stuff at all, their compensation for declining Gf, the Gc us oldies had to learn, will not be there, so we're storing up a great wadge of people who will become steadily dumber as they age...which is going to be tricky for them at the very least. :bored: :willy:

This also undermines the notion that 'rote learning' is bad, because without stored knowledge we're all heading for stupid. :headbang:

For those of you (oldies) that knew this, you probably also know that exercise and 'using it' are the two best defences. It's also why I keep a notebook - not because I ever look at them per se - but I know that if I read/listen to something, take stock every now and then and write down what I just covered, three to four times more information stays in my head. I could be watching "Bromans" instead though...

(....and now you know why reality TV is bad for us) :cool2:
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
Reality TV: As Billy Connolly once said "People sitting in houses watching people sitting in houses"!!!!!
 

huddsy

Junior Acolyte
Joined
Oct 15, 2017
Messages
34
Likes
24
Points
9
I'm guessing a lot of the posters here are oldies as the spelling is all correct, and the punctuation is all correct too. And NOBODY has so far confused "have" and "of". That winds me up when you see people writing "He must of"........
I want to scream at them "HAVE!!!!! IT'S HAVE!!! MUST HAVE NOT MUST OF"
Argggggggghhhhhhhhh!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:wtf:
 

GNC

King-Sized Canary
Joined
Aug 25, 2001
Messages
28,103
Likes
13,024
Points
284
John Steinbeck uses "must of" in Of Mice and Men, I think George says it, so by no means a new phenomenon.
 
Top