Kids Today

huddsy

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I've met a similar situation with younger work colleagues who didn't have the same mental flexibility with numbers as I had. They could get to the correct answer in the end but in a more laborious manner - and that was using a calculator as well. I don't think they can juggle numbers like older folk can. It's the way they are taught these days.
 

Coal

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How I learned to multiply a double digit number by 11 is to add the two numerals and put them in the middle. So 11x16=176 because 1+6=7, and that 7 goes between the 1 and 6.
I'm amazed I never knew that, brilliant.
 

huddsy

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How I learned to multiply a double digit number by 11 is to add the two numerals and put them in the middle. So 11x16=176 because 1+6=7, and that 7 goes between the 1 and 6.
I'd heard of this one. It's things like this that I like about maths.
 

Coal

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Anybody else know any nifty tricks with figures?
I was taught a 'Napier's Bones' method of multiplication at an early age (from a class-mate).

Like this:
nb.gif
You multiply each pair of number together and write the product in the square 'for each pair'. So 2 x 9 =18, in the top left square, 6 x 9=54 in the top right and so on. If a product is in single digits, place a zero in the leading half of the square.

Then add the numbers together along the diagonal lines, starting with the diagonal on the far right (2), this is the least significant digit of the answer. Then the next (8+4+4=16), the '6' is the next digit of the answer, carry the '1' to the next diagonal and add (4+2+6+5+1=18). And so on.

You'll need you 12 x tables to make this fly fast, but I generally can outperform most people using this method and it's relatively error proof as the steps are simple in themselves.
 

huddsy

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It's taken me a couple of minutes to study what you did there, but this is certainly a very good trick! It's certainly one I've never seen before. Off to find a paper and pen now and have a go myself!! Presumably you're multiplying 246 x 97 in this example?
 

Coal

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It's taken me a couple of minutes to study what you did there, but this is certainly a very good trick! It's certainly one I've never seen before. Off to find a paper and pen now and have a go myself!! Presumably you're multiplying 246 x 97 in this example?
Yes. It's based on:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Napier's_bones

Although I didn't know that at the time (1972).
 

Gizmos Mama

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If we have a generation of people who don't care to learn stuff at all, their compensation for declining Gf, the Gc us oldies had to learn, will not be there, so we're storing up a great wadge of people who will become steadily dumber as they age...which is going to be tricky for them at the very least. :bored: :willy:
This is what frightens me the most about (and for) the younger generations, and the future of the human race.

A little off topic, but it is pertinent to the subject. A few years ago, (more like 10, now that I think about it!) I started going to Chan Buddhist meditation classes at a local Temple. You could stay afterward, and they would teach us things, answer questions, etc about it.

An interesting concept is the age we live in now is the called the "Dharma Ending Age", and they believe that we are headed for a 10,000 year long "dark ages", because true knowledge and wisdom will cease to exist in this plane, and ignorance and chaos will reign.

This more recent, sudden and very alarming directional shift in society in general, but specifically in younger people due to their technological dependence, for the reason mentioned by you in the quote above, is a real path by which, in one generation, a whole civilizations knowledge could be lost. If nobody will bother to actually learn it, and the information gets lost, it is gone...

My co worker and I were discussing this very topic today, and he emailed this link about the fragility of information in the modern age.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/10/memory-machines-and-collective-memory
 

dreeness .

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Indeed, early sexualisation is something to be avoided. But the idea that there is something wrong with being LGBT should also be avoided and I don't think either of you were suggesting that.

Increasingly schoolchildren are coming from Lesbian/Gay families so questions will arise about this among pupils from traditional families. Its important that teachers are trained to deal with this in a sensitive manner. That should not include encouraging kids to be gender fluid and it doesn't have to include actual sex education.

I'm bisexual and I think i first started wonder about my sexuality around puberty but other LGBT people I know say they had inklings much earlier. I don't know what the correct age for actual sex education to begin is but when any sex education is introduced then it shouldn't stigmatise LGBTs. But nothing wrong with saying that approx 95% of people are straight.
> Says children should not be sexualized.
> Proceeds to explain the sexuality of children.

Oh now that is deep. Really gets the noggin joggin.
That's some Hegelian-level logic, right there.
Or something.
 

escargot

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Indeed, early sexualisation is something to be avoided. But the idea that there is something wrong with being LGBT should also be avoided and I don't think either of you were suggesting that.

Increasingly schoolchildren are coming from Lesbian/Gay families so questions will arise about this among pupils from traditional families. Its important that teachers are trained to deal with this in a sensitive manner. That should not include encouraging kids to be gender fluid and it doesn't have to include actual sex education.

I'm bisexual and I think i first started wonder about my sexuality around puberty but other LGBT people I know say they had inklings much earlier. I don't know what the correct age for actual sex education to begin is but when any sex education is introduced then it shouldn't stigmatise LGBTs. But nothing wrong with saying that approx 95% of people are straight.
The subject of LGBT people didn't come up enough to bother about when my kids were very young, or at least, it didn't seem to cross my path very often. The fact that I have a gay son who came out to us at 16 means that I was wrong about that! He felt able to tell us though so we must've done something right.

However, if the question had arisen I would have easily dealt with it, openly and honestly as I did with everything else. I'd talk about love and not go into details about sex. 'When grown up men and ladies love each other they can live together and they might get married, like Uncle Darren and Auntie Donna. Sometimes grown up men love other men instead of ladies, and a lady can love another lady instead of a man. They can live together too.' (No marriage back then of course.)

What's so difficult about that?

(I'm not getting at you, Ramon, just explaining that kids' questions about relationships can be answered without sexualising them.)
 

Shadowsot

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This is what frightens me the most about (and for) the younger generations, and the future of the human race.

A little off topic, but it is pertinent to the subject. A few years ago, (more like 10, now that I think about it!) I started going to Chan Buddhist meditation classes at a local Temple. You could stay afterward, and they would teach us things, answer questions, etc about it.

An interesting concept is the age we live in now is the called the "Dharma Ending Age", and they believe that we are headed for a 10,000 year long "dark ages", because true knowledge and wisdom will cease to exist in this plane, and ignorance and chaos will reign.

This more recent, sudden and very alarming directional shift in society in general, but specifically in younger people due to their technological dependence, for the reason mentioned by you in the quote above, is a real path by which, in one generation, a whole civilizations knowledge could be lost. If nobody will bother to actually learn it, and the information gets lost, it is gone...

My co worker and I were discussing this very topic today, and he emailed this link about the fragility of information in the modern age.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2017/10/memory-machines-and-collective-memory
Like other end of civilization claims, I don't really buy it.
Putting it simply, putting a certain mental exercise off onto another machine opens up more mental energy for other work.
You can look to the spread of literacy, for example. Or the internet. Or even earlier, when hunting and gathering skills transitioned to farming akills. The result was principally more free time, but also opened up routes to larger societies.
It comes off to me, as more of the usual complaining about the younger generation.
"Kids today can't even do x, how can they expect to do y?"
 
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> Says children should not be sexualized.
> Proceeds to explain the sexuality of children.

Oh now that is deep. Really gets the noggin joggin.
That's some Hegelian-level logic, right there.
Or something.
Are you saying that there is something wrong with being LGBT?

This is what I wrote:

I don't know what the correct age for actual sex education to begin is but when any sex education is introduced then it shouldn't stigmatise LGBTs. But nothing wrong with saying that approx 95% of people are straight.

Do you think that LGBT people should be stigmatised?
 
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The subject of LGBT people didn't come up enough to bother about when my kids were very young, or at least, it didn't seem to cross my path very often. The fact that I have a gay son who came out to us at 16 means that I was wrong about that! He felt able to tell us though so we must've done something right.

However, if the question had arisen I would have easily dealt with it, openly and honestly as I did with everything else. I'd talk about love and not go into details about sex. 'When grown up men and ladies love each other they can live together and they might get married, like Uncle Darren and Auntie Donna. Sometimes grown up men love other men instead of ladies, and a lady can love another lady instead of a man. They can live together too.' (No marriage back then of course.)

What's so difficult about that?

(I'm not getting at you, Ramon, just explaining that kids' questions about relationships can be answered without sexualising them.)
What you're saying is fine.

But this is what I wrote:

I don't know what the correct age for actual sex education to begin is but when any sex education is introduced then it shouldn't stigmatise LGBTs. But nothing wrong with saying that approx 95% of people are straight.

I'm don't see how that has anything to do with sexualising children.Note that I said I didn't know what age sex education should begin. But when it does begin in school surely care should be taken to ensure that there is no stigmatisation of LGBTs.
 

gerhard1

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We discussed the acid attacks here. This shouldn't be made into a political footbal, just accept that a mistake was made and change the law back, swiftly.

The Government ignored expert advice and made changes in 2015 that made it easier to buy dangerous acids that have been used in a spate of attacks in recent weeks, The Independent can reveal.

Changes made in the Deregulation Act 2015 scrapped an obligation on sellers of dangerous substances, including acids, to be registered with their local council. The move was opposed by medical experts, who warned that it could make it easier for criminals to get their hands on highly toxic substances, and by the Government’s own advisory board on the regulation of hazardous chemicals.

Ministers boasted at the time about “cutting red tape” but are now under mounting pressure from MPs and campaigners to re-tighten laws to make it harder for people to get their hands on highly concentrated acids. It comes after dozens of people were injured in a spate of acid attacks, with London being particularly affected by the incidents. ...

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...act-conservatives-poisons-board-a7856041.html
And then there's this. Tossing water into others faces.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/u...id-attack-arya-mosallah-itzarya-a8182206.html
 
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At least he didn't run away to join a circus.

A zoo in the Georgian capital Tbilisi has given a lucky 10-year-old boy a free year-long pass, after he sneaked out of his house and travelled some 130km (80 miles) on a train on his own to see the animals.

Dato Nozadze's escapade ended disappointingly, Georgian media reports. On arriving in Tbilisi, he found the zoo had closed for the day.

A police patrol later noticed him wandering alone on a street, contacted his parents, and returned him to his home in the central Georgian town of Khashuri.

The Tbilisi Zoological Park decided, however, to honour his "special love of animals".

The following day, the same police officers returned to Dato's house to bring him back to the zoo to see the animals and receive his pass, the Netgazeti website reported.

http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-43173283
 

Iris

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8 month old grandson absolutely loves his mother's iPhone. If he spots it in her hands he immediately poses and smiles.
She says that if she puts it down he tries to climb over her to get it and I know that when I ring her he makes a fuss till he can listen to me talk.
Yesterday she bought him a Fisher price toy iPhone that lights up and makes noises when the buttons are pushed but I think he prefers hers.
I'm surprised at such a young age he can push the buttons on her phone to see the pictures and he loves taking things apart or seeing how they work already.
 

Swifty

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I was told recently that one of the Millennials at my workplace thought that the Sun and the Moon were the same thing.

Apparently she thought the 'Sun' was on one side of the round thing in the sky and the 'Moon' was on the other.

FFS! :pop:
I had one ask me how to make a 'white' coffee about ten years ago .. I'd have laughed but he was employed as my waiter.
 

EnolaGaia

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The good news is that the girl convinced her parents to donate the excess purchases to a local children's hospital.

AmazonKidPkgs.jpg
Girl, 6, buys $350 worth of toys on mom's Amazon account
A Utah 6-year-old used her mother's Amazon account to secretly buy $350 worth of toys and ended up donating them to a children's hospital.

Ria Diyaolu tweeted a photo that went viral this week showing her cousin, Kaitlin, standing next to a pile of Amazon boxes at her family's Ogden home.

Kaitlin's mother said the girl had permission to buy a Barbie from Amazon for her birthday and she gave the child access to her account so she could check the shipping status of the order.

The girl used the Amazon information to buy another $350 worth of toys, which her parents didn't know about until they arrived at the house.

"My badass little cousin ordered $300 worth of toys w/o my aunt & uncle knowing," Diyaolu wrote in the tweet. "This is a picture of how everyone found out."

Kaitlin's mom said her girl was grounded from the Internet for a month, and Diyaolu tweeted an update on Wednesday saying Kaitlin had convinced her parents to donate the toys to a children's hospital instead of returning them to Amazon. ...
SOURCE: https://www.upi.com/Odd_News/2018/0...ys-on-moms-Amazon-account/2151534356690/?sl=4

(Photo shown is not the one published with the cited article)
 

Swifty

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GNC

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I think it was Carrie Fisher who said "The trouble with instant gratification is that it's not instant enough". So you keep clicking to feed the need of product, knowing the purchase will still take a few days (or hours) to arrive.
 

EnolaGaia

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I think it was Carrie Fisher who said "The trouble with instant gratification is that it's not instant enough". So you keep clicking to feed the need of product, knowing the purchase will still take a few days (or hours) to arrive.
If anything, the shipping delay aggravates the mania for immediacy, because one feels pressured to get the process started ASAP.
 

GNC

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And you can't download a Barbie. (Waits for someone to tell me you can download a Barbie, with a 3D printer).
 
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