Kooky Kentucky

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A general thread for weirdness and oddity from Kentucky.

Its part of a wider range of threads themed on local issues:

http://www.forteantimes.com/forum/showthread.php?s=&threadid=16008

-----------------------
Daily Feature Sunday, August 22, 2004


Kentucky's Urban legends

Some are false, some are true, and some are just Internet rumors

By Larry Muhammad
[email protected]

The Courier-Journal



Heard about the headless woman haunting Iroquois Park in Louisville? The UFO abduction on Ky. 78 near Stanford? How about Col. Harland Sanders leaving KFC millions to the Ku Klux Klan?

Welcome to the world of urban legends — those fantastically titillating rumors, hoaxes, myths and mysteries that seem to spread like kudzu over the Internet.

Several sites, including Urban Legends Research Centre (http://www.ulrc.com.au); snopes.com, which has an Urban Legends Reference page with 40 categories; and urbanlegends.about.com, trace the genealogy of the tales and rate their veracity.

Here's a representative sample from the online magazine http://www.scambusters.org:

,000 in UPS uniforms are purchased by suspected terrorists (denied by UPS, FBI, Department of Homeland Security).

Amazon.com promotes "Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion" (actually the site called it "a pernicious fraud").

Al Gore transposes biblical scriptures John 3:16 as John 16:3 in campaign speech and didn't know the difference (never happened).

Heroin overdose kills 3-year-old Texas boy after he falls on a hypodermic needle in a McDonald's play area (a hoax).

Typically, these whoppers materialize as if from nowhere, says Erika Brady, a professor in Western Kentucky University's Department of Folk Studies.

"It's a little like asking where a joke comes from," Brady said. "No one can really quite put their finger on it.

"What's clear is that they take on variations, depending on local circumstances or details of a particular region, so that stories in Louisville about children being attacked will be in a men's room in The Mall. But in Nashville, it will be Green Hills Mall, and Greenwood Mall in Bowling Green."

To folklorists, "legends" are stories from the past based on truth, such as George Washington and the cherry tree, Brady said.

But she credits Jan Harold Brunvand, English professor emeritus at the University of Utah and author of such books as "The Vanishing Hitchhiker," "Too Good to Be True: The Colossal Book of Urban Legends" and "Curses! Broiled Again!" (all from WW Norton & Co.), with popularizing the term "urban legend."

And Kentucky has its share....

No, a slave's remains aren't buried in Daniel Boone's grave, despite a century-old rumor that a mix-up occurred in 1845 when Boone was dug up from his original resting place in Defiance, Mo., and re-interred in Frankfort.

State legislators did not seek to change the value of pi to exactly 3.14 because Kentucky schoolchildren are mathematically challenged.

Yes, there really is gold in Fort Knox, although few eyes have seen it, and Internet stories to the contrary keep proliferating from the likes of conspiracy theorist Sherman Skolnick (to investment newsletter Freemarket Gold & Money Report, among many others).

And as nearly everyone knows, Harland Sanders sold Kentucky Fried Chicken before he died.

Says Snopes.com, "One of the curiosities of urban legendry is that nearly every founder of a fast-food chain who is publicly identifiable by virtue of having appeared in his company's advertisements has become the subject of rumors associating him (and his company) with the most unsavory groups society has to offer: Satan worshippers and the KKK."

But even bona fide happenings can be so amazing or ridiculous that they become legends. Like the song "Happy Birthday to You" being written by kindergarten-teaching sisters, Patty and Mildred Hill, in 19th-century Louisville. It's true.

Or the state House of Representatives considering a facetious 2002 resolution, HR256, to buy a submarine to blast casino riverboats out of Commonwealth waters: "The House of Representatives does hereby authorize the notification of the casino riverboat consulate of this resolution and impending whoopin' so that they may remove their casino vessels to friendlier waters." They did it as a joke.

Then there are the mysteries — questionable occurrences that can't positively be disproved or that fall under official jurisdictions that deny their reality.

For instance: Did a private jet fly Saudi royals from Tampa, Fla., to Lexington's Blue Grass Airport two days after Sept. 11, during a general ban on air travel?

Though reputable newspapers — the Tampa Tribune, St. Petersburg Times and Lexington Herald-Leader — published stories that named names and quoted a former Tampa police officer and former FBI agent who made the trip as hired security escorts, the White House and federal aviation and law enforcement officials insist it never happened.

Snopes.com produced a related 14-page report in its Urban Legends Reference Pages titled "Flight of Fancy," concluding that yes, "the U.S. government allowed bin Laden family members to fly within the country during a general ban on air travel."

And while we're on the topic of airborne phenomena, in 1976, three Casey County women — Mary Louise Smith, Mona Floyd (then Stafford) and Elaine Thomas — claimed they were abducted by a UFO. The three attracted UFO investigators, passed polygraph tests, went on national television, and the case remains a mystery.

Reached by telephone at her Liberty, Ky., home, Floyd said, "Elaine and Louise both have passed away, but I can remember it just as clear.

"I've thought they would come back to get me, like they might be watching me, listening to what I'm saying right now, for all I know. I know this sounds childish, but I'm a 63-year-old woman, and I'm very sane."

Legendary for being haunted is Bobby Mackey's Music World, a Wilder, Ky., nightclub and former speakeasy during the '20s, site of several unsolved murders and inspiration for the book "Hell's Gate" by Douglas Hensley. Patrons reportedly see ghosts in the building. In 1994 one guest sued, claiming a ghost assaulted him in the bathroom.

There's also the image of a dead young woman etched in the window of a cemetery sexton house in Russellville, Ky., which supposedly happened the minute she was struck by lightning while cursing the heavens during a thunderstorm that spoiled her picnic plans.

Other times, fictional creatures thrive in the public consciousness, like the Pope Lick Monster, a half-man, half-sheep whose hypnotic gaze lures people to the 90-foot high, 772-foot long train trestle in eastern Jefferson County, and ultimately to their death. This one inspired a 16-minute movie in 1988, "Legend of the Pope Lick Monster" by Ron Schildknecht.

Brady, the Western Kentucky University professor, said, "In almost every city there will be a bridge or trestle on the outskirts of town that will have a similar story. And there's a tradition of going and visiting these sites.

"Kids will go out there who have their driver's license, sometimes with beer involved, sometimes combined with a romantic rendezvous. 'Legend tripping' is the term, and it's a social practice of visiting the sites of urban legends to see if maybe you can get any evidence."

Keith Age, president of the Louisville Ghost Hunters Society, remembers, as a teenager in the 1970s, looking for the headless woman who haunts Iroquois Park.

"She supposedly lived right there next to the park, she and her husband had gotten into a fight and he beheaded her," said Age, 41. "This supposedly happened in the 1960s, but there was no documentation, nothing to resemble it on police blotters anywhere.

"There's a woman supposedly runs through Waverly Hills Sanitarium with her wrists slit, screaming 'Help me! Help me!'" Age said. "Much time as I've spent up there, I never saw her."

---------------------------
QUICK TAKE

Urban legends seem to materialize from nowhere and have a life of their own. Often they hold a moral lesson, reinforce stereotypes, appeal for empathy and are truthful-sounding enough to be believable.

The acknowledged expert is Jan Harold Brunvand, English professor emeritus at the University of Utah and author of such books as "The Vanishing Hitchhiker," "Too Good to Be True: The Colossal Book of Urban Legends" and "Curses! Broiled Again!" (all from WW Norton & Co.).

Several Web sites trace the genealogy of the tales and rate their veracity:

http://www.scambusters.org
http://www.ulrc.com.au, Urban Legends Research Centre
http://www.snopes.com, which has an Urban Legends Reference Page with 40 categories
http://www.urbanlegends.about.com

For more on the Fort Knox rumors:

See conspiracy theorist Sherman Skolnick's take at http://www.skolnicksreport.com/hoodwink.html
See what investment newsletter Freemarket Gold & Money Report has to say at http://www.fgmr.com/right2know.htm.
Check the U.S. Department of Treasury for government facts at http://www.usmint.gov/about_the_mint/fun_facts/index.cfm?action=fun_facts13.

For more information on the Saudi family flight rumors:

Get the Herald-Leader story at http://www.kentucky.com/mld/kentucky/news/state/8885976.htm
See the St. Petersburg Times story at http://www.saintpetersburgtimes.com
Read Snopes.com's report at http://www.snopes.com/rumors/flight.htm

http://www.courierjournal.com/features/2004/08/22/urbanlegends.html
 
A

Anonymous

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Kentucky's Urban Legends

Legend Trippin': How to Get Lucky In Kentucky

http://www.courier-journal.com/features/2004/08/22/urbanlegends.html

Kentucky's Urban legends
Some are false, some are true, and some are just Internet rumors
By Larry Muhammad
The Courier-Journal
Sunday, August 22, 2004

Heard about the headless woman haunting Iroquois Park in Louisville? The UFO abduction on Ky. 78 near Stanford? How about Col. Harland Sanders leaving KFC millions to the Ku Klux Klan?

Welcome to the world of urban legends — those fantastically titillating rumors, hoaxes, myths and mysteries that seem to spread like kudzu over the Internet.

Several sites, including Urban Legends Research Centre http://www.ulrc.com.au; snopes.com, which has an Urban Legends Reference page with 40 categories; and urbanlegends.about.com, trace the genealogy of the tales and rate their veracity.

Here's a representative sample from the online magazine http://www.scambusters.org:

,000 in UPS uniforms are purchased by suspected terrorists (denied by UPS, FBI, Department of Homeland Security).

Amazon.com promotes "Protocols of the Learned Elders of Zion" (actually the site called it "a pernicious fraud").

Al Gore transposes biblical scriptures John 3:16 as John 16:3 in campaign speech and didn't know the difference (never happened).

Heroin overdose kills 3-year-old Texas boy after he falls on a hypodermic needle in a McDonald's play area (a hoax).

Typically, these whoppers materialize as if from nowhere, says Erika Brady, a professor in Western Kentucky University's Department of Folk Studies.

"It's a little like asking where a joke comes from," Brady said. "No one can really quite put their finger on it.

"What's clear is that they take on variations, depending on local circumstances or details of a particular region, so that stories in Louisville about children being attacked will be in a men's room in The Mall. But in Nashville, it will be Green Hills Mall, and Greenwood Mall in Bowling Green."

To folklorists, "legends" are stories from the past based on truth, such as George Washington and the cherry tree, Brady said.

But she credits Jan Harold Brunvand, English professor emeritus at the University of Utah and author of such books as "The Vanishing Hitchhiker," "Too Good to Be True: The Colossal Book of Urban Legends" and "Curses! Broiled Again!" (all from WW Norton & Co.), with popularizing the term "urban legend."

And Kentucky has its share....

No, a slave's remains aren't buried in Daniel Boone's grave, despite a century-old rumor that a mix-up occurred in 1845 when Boone was dug up from his original resting place in Defiance, Mo., and re-interred in Frankfort.

State legislators did not seek to change the value of pi to exactly 3.14 because Kentucky schoolchildren are mathematically challenged.

Yes, there really is gold in Fort Knox, although few eyes have seen it, and Internet stories to the contrary keep proliferating from the likes of conspiracy theorist Sherman Skolnick (to investment newsletter Freemarket Gold & Money Report, among many others).

And as nearly everyone knows, Harland Sanders sold Kentucky Fried Chicken before he died.

Says Snopes.com, "One of the curiosities of urban legendry is that nearly every founder of a fast-food chain who is publicly identifiable by virtue of having appeared in his company's advertisements has become the subject of rumors associating him (and his company) with the most unsavory groups society has to offer: Satan worshippers and the KKK."

But even bona fide happenings can be so amazing or ridiculous that they become legends. Like the song "Happy Birthday to You" being written by kindergarten-teaching sisters, Patty and Mildred Hill, in 19th-century Louisville. It's true.

Or the state House of Representatives considering a facetious 2002 resolution, HR256, to buy a submarine to blast casino riverboats out of Commonwealth waters: "The House of Representatives does hereby authorize the notification of the casino riverboat consulate of this resolution and impending whoopin' so that they may remove their casino vessels to friendlier waters." They did it as a joke.

Then there are the mysteries — questionable occurrences that can't positively be disproved or that fall under official jurisdictions that deny their reality.

For instance: Did a private jet fly Saudi royals from Tampa, Fla., to Lexington's Blue Grass Airport two days after Sept. 11, during a general ban on air travel?

Though reputable newspapers — the Tampa Tribune, St. Petersburg Times and Lexington Herald-Leader — published stories that named names and quoted a former Tampa police officer and former FBI agent who made the trip as hired security escorts, the White House and federal aviation and law enforcement officials insist it never happened.

Snopes.com produced a related 14-page report in its Urban Legends Reference Pages titled "Flight of Fancy," concluding that yes, "the U.S. government allowed bin Laden family members to fly within the country during a general ban on air travel."

And while we're on the topic of airborne phenomena, in 1976, three Casey County women — Mary Louise Smith, Mona Floyd (then Stafford) and Elaine Thomas — claimed they were abducted by a UFO. The three attracted UFO investigators, passed polygraph tests, went on national television, and the case remains a mystery.

Reached by telephone at her Liberty, Ky., home, Floyd said, "Elaine and Louise both have passed away, but I can remember it just as clear.

"I've thought they would come back to get me, like they might be watching me, listening to what I'm saying right now, for all I know. I know this sounds childish, but I'm a 63-year-old woman, and I'm very sane."

Legendary for being haunted is Bobby Mackey's Music World, a Wilder, Ky., nightclub and former speakeasy during the '20s, site of several unsolved murders and inspiration for the book "Hell's Gate" by Douglas Hensley. Patrons reportedly see ghosts in the building. In 1994 one guest sued, claiming a ghost assaulted him in the bathroom.

There's also the image of a dead young woman etched in the window of a cemetery sexton house in Russellville, Ky., which supposedly happened the minute she was struck by lightning while cursing the heavens during a thunderstorm that spoiled her picnic plans.

Other times, fictional creatures thrive in the public consciousness, like the Pope Lick Monster, a half-man, half-sheep whose hypnotic gaze lures people to the 90-foot high, 772-foot long train trestle in eastern Jefferson County, and ultimately to their death. This one inspired a 16-minute movie in 1988, "Legend of the Pope Lick Monster" by Ron Schildknecht.

Brady, the Western Kentucky University professor, said, "In almost every city there will be a bridge or trestle on the outskirts of town that will have a similar story. And there's a tradition of going and visiting these sites.

"Kids will go out there who have their driver's license, sometimes with beer involved, sometimes combined with a romantic rendezvous. 'Legend tripping' is the term, and it's a social practice of visiting the sites of urban legends to see if maybe you can get any evidence."

Keith Age, president of the Louisville Ghost Hunters Society, remembers, as a teenager in the 1970s, looking for the headless woman who haunts Iroquois Park.

"She supposedly lived right there next to the park, she and her husband had gotten into a fight and he beheaded her," said Age, 41. "This supposedly happened in the 1960s, but there was no documentation, nothing to resemble it on police blotters anywhere.

"There's a woman supposedly runs through Waverly Hills Sanitarium with her wrists slit, screaming 'Help me! Help me!'" Age said. "Much time as I've spent up there, I never saw her."
 

Mighty_Emperor

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If you happen to be at the State Fair.....

Entering booth space, the final frontier

Bob Hill

As Earle T. Benezet sees it, his biggest problem at the Kentucky State Fair is trying to give something away while everyone around him is selling something.

The other major problem is his product.

Benezet, 56, of Lexington, is the state director of the Mutual UFO Network — as in unidentified flying objects. Flying saucers. Fast-moving lights low in the evening sky. Supposedly piloted — on occasion — by little creatures in silver suits. Or cuter creatures trying to phone home.

The final problem is that Benezet could talk the legs off a table of election-eve politicians. He's seen too many people back away from the UFO beliefs. He expects the skepticism and bad press, so he's always got to hurry his pitch — a self-defeating cycle.

From his booth in the East Wing, words pour helplessly from him in a please-listen-to-me UFO torrent; details of past unacknowledged sightings; vast government conspiracies designed to keep UFO information and technology from us; Air Force planes secretly filling the sky with tiny pieces of aluminum to deflect the sun's rays and slow global warning.

UFO proponents relentlessly hyping conspiracy theories are forever getting in their own way. Their general belief is that our space visitors haven't dropped in to the local Starbucks to offer some badly needed advice because they live by the Star Trek "prime directive:" Observe, but don't mess with, the locals.

And only about two more months to the next election.

What are the odds?

The best thing Benezet has going for him is this: With billions and billions of other stars and planets out there, many learned people with — and without — a UFO bent believe the chances are very good that some of them contain some form of active life.

And there have been enough unexplained sightings to keep the UFO pot boiling.

Yet whether sentient life has actually shown up above Plow Bottom, Mo., piloting flying saucers or blobs of light and leaving mutilated cows, shotgun-toting farmers, perfectly aligned pyramids and crop circles in their extraterrestrial wake is another matter.

"I am passionate on the matter," said Benezet.

Yeah, well so was the guy in the booth next to Benezet selling Liquid Lustre car wax. He was cranking his product through a microphone headset, drawing in small crowds of state-fair believers with a timeless, perfectly cadenced car-wax shtick, working under bright lights and rubbing relentlessly on a shiny red car hood; "two bottles, 32 ounces only ."

The much more subdued guy across from Benezet's booth was selling medical insurance, financial planning and health savings accounts — to practically no one.

Closer to home

The people in the booth on the other side of Benezet's were selling Kentucky — or at least Kentucky T-shirts. Many were the usual vibrant Kentucky blue, yet others were lime, teal and especially pink, snug-fitting shirts in what is apparently a trend to broaden the University of Kentucky's color scheme, if not its sentient life.

Given all that — along with an Elvis impersonator and racing pigs — Benezet seemed a logical and necessary fit in the overall state fair proceedings.

My previously undisclosed theory about our Earth's place in the larger firmament is that the universe is a big baseball game and our planet is actually a rotating curveball hurled eons ago by a master pitcher.

Unfortunately, waiting for us somewhere down the road is a guy with a really big bat.

I'm well aware my "Big Stick" theory can sound a little loony, so I may get a booth at next year's state fair to further explain it.

Fair facts

The Kentucky State Fair runs through tomorrow at the Kentucky Fair & Exposition Center in Louisville. Gates open at 7a.m. daily; exhibit buildings are open 9a.m. to 10p.m. daily.

Parking is .

Admission: Adults, ; people 55 and older, ; children 3 to 12; ; children 2 and younger, free.

On the Web

For the complete Kentucky State Fair schedule, check out the C-J Fair Page
http://www.courier-journal.com/localnews/2004/08/28ky/B1-hill0828-6448.html
 

Mighty_Emperor

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Saturday, January 29, 2005

Weird Kentucky develops a following

By Amy Barnes
Special to The Courier-Journal

Where's the small Kentucky town no one will claim? Is there really a goat man of Pope Lick, and why is there a giant fish looming over Dixie Highway?

If you're interested in such strange phenomena, look no further than two local experts whose travels take them off the so-called beaten path, looking for the little oddities and coincidences that, as they say, can "only happen in Kentucky."

Mr. Holland's Kentucky

Louisville artist Jeffrey Scott Holland achieved his local fame sort of by accident. Long interested in odd people and places, he began snapping digital photos and posting them on a Web site called the "Unusual Kentucky Compendium" in 2001.

Holland said, "Unusual Kentucky covers it all: interesting people from the past and present, cemeteries and odd tombstones, abandoned places, hauntings, roads, buildings, attractions, culture, towns, mysteries and assorted weird stuff.

"It also covers good ancient diners and retro restaurants from time to time," he added.

So what makes for good Web-site fodder?

"It's not all Charles Manson and UFOs," Holland said. "It can be something as simple as Richmond's downtown fountain with a cranky-looking fish, or the fact that a penny has been wedged into the corner of the rear handrail of Berea's Boone Tavern for as long as I can remember."

The compendium was mentioned in USA Today and listed as the Yahoo "site of the week." It got so many hits that Holland could no longer afford the bandwidth to support it. It's now a continually rotating log of unusual material (www.geocities.com/unusualkentucky) , with a few new entries added each week.

Holland plans to release the "volumes and volumes" of material he had to remove from the site on CD or in book form by the end of the year.

Many entries on the Unusual Kentucky Compendium also will be represented in an upcoming "Invisible Topography" show, a maze-like fun house filled with paintings covering such subjects as the Pope Lick Monster, UFO abductions in Stanford and Lexington's Grillo the Clown.

Holland said it will open this summer.

In the meantime, here is a sampling on the Unusual Kentucky Compendium:

Tombstone Junction: This Wild West theme park outside Corbin, built in the 1950s, burned down in 1989 when a mysterious fire erupted; now, all that's left is a few roasted railroad cars and the Tombstone Junction sign. Holland is looking for photographs from anyone who vacationed there.

Bondurant's Pharmacy: A drive-through pharmacy in Lexington shaped like a mortar and pestle.

The Mother Goose House: A man named George Stacy built a giant green goose atop his house in Hazard.

The Blue Grass Army Depot: This Madison County storage facility houses nerve gas and is a popular site for UFO sightings. Rumor has it an alien spacecraft was once stored here.

The Nameless Grocery Store in Wildie, which doesn't sell much of anything, and is very "Children of the Corn," the site says - only "without the children. Or, the corn."

An Ancient Civilization under Kentucky: The story goes that in 1783, a 300-foot-long, 100-foot-wide burial ground was found beneath the city of Lexington that contained exotic artifacts, a stone altar (for sacrifices?), human skulls and bones and mummified remains. The mummies were "very strange-looking and had red hair."

The strange orange fungus in a Lexington cemetery: See the pictures. Ewwwww.

One curious Kentuckian

Most people know author Vince Staten as the person who has the answers to life's most important questions, such as "Do Bald Men Get Half Price Haircuts?" or "Did Monkeys Invent the Monkey Wrench?"

Quite a character himself, Staten, 57, has been covering Kentucky's underbelly for years, in addition to penning colorful commentary on topics of natural interest such as barbecue and baseball (and writing a weekly video column).

Staten wrote a book in 1990 called "Unauthorized America: A Travel Guide to the Places the Chamber of Commerce Won't Tell You About."

His propensity to seek out the curious and the bizarre, Staten said, is his answer to "all the road trips we took as a child. You'd drive down the highway, and you'd see a historic marker on the road, and you'd get out and look, and say, 'Oh!' Then you'd get back in the car and drive on to the next one."

Staten's most recent writings can be found in the eccentric travel guide, "Kentucky Curiosities: Quirky Characters, Roadside Oddities & Other Offbeat Stuff" (2003).

The collection of stories ranges from unmarked roadside oddities to unusual outdoor festivals and other useless information. Absent from the book are Charles Manson's boyhood home address (a private residence in Ashland, Ky.) and the fact that Muhammad Ali chucked his Olympic gold medal into the Ohio River, two stories that were edited out as a sort of PR move for the state.

Here are some of the entries you will find, though:

Harrison Mayes: This Middlesboro man had a vision of God while pinned against the wall of a Kentucky coal mine by a runaway coal car. Following his near-death experience, Mayes erected a large cross of light bulbs on a mountain overlooking East Middlesboro.

The Charles Heigold House: This facade was constructed as a monument to President James Buchanan by a German immigrant. Now located on River Road, it has achieved national acclaim and has appeared in Liberty Bank commercials.

Vent Haven: This ventriloquism museum in Fort Mitchell is home to nearly 600 dummies. Fort Mitchell is also home to the world's smallest church, the Monte Casino Chapel, which measures 6 feet by 9 feet.

The only replica of the tomb of Jesus: It took TV evangelist Morris H. Coers 10 years to see this project to fruition in Covington; unfortunately, he died two months before its dedication.

The Town Nobody Wants: The town of Static lies on the Kentucky/Tennessee border and is rejected by both states.
Source

Site (down when I looked as it had exceeded its bandwidth):
http://www.geocities.com/unusualkentucky/

Details on CD (from the unofficial JSH site):

September 30 --

-- -- The Unusual Kentucky Compendium, a combination CD-ROM/booklet which collects all the thousands of past entries from JSH's Unusual Kentucky website, was originally scheduled to be released around Halloween. According to JLK Productions, the company publishing the package, that deadline will probably not able to be met. JSH told us: "If they can't get it done by December, I'll just drag all the raw files onto CDs myself and put them out before Christmas. It'll be primitive, but hey, so is everything I do. Then the more official version can come out later." We have been assured that we are at the top of the list for review copies.
http://www.geocities.com/jeffreyscottho ... chive.html

I like his Spunt postcards too.
 

EnolaGaia

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The Mother Goose House: A man named George Stacy built a giant green goose atop his house in Hazard.
Here's a recent photo of the Mother Goose House.


Unfortunately, the goose head feel off during bad weather this past week. The owners had already started a campaign to raise money for restoration, but now the house's "beheading" has drawn attention to the effort..
Kentucky town rallies to restore beheaded Mother Goose

A community in Kentucky is rallying to help restore an 80-year-old landmark — an oval shaped building that has a domed roof with the neck and head of a goose sticking out the front. Until last week, that is, when the goose was beheaded by strong winds.

The owners had put up a Go Fund Me page on March 20, saying the head had moved off its foundation and couldn’t be stabilized. They were raising funds to reconstruct it. Then on Wednesday, they posted an update. The head had fallen. ...

The building has served as a home, a service station, a market and an inn over the years
FULL STORY: https://apnews.com/article/kentucky-49e16826f851f6f6b00c5e08dbbfb1fb
 

Kondoru

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I can just see Planning having heart failure over that.
 

Coastaljames

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Try the excellent "Penny Royal" podcast if it's Kentucky wyrdness ye're after.
 

Austin Popper

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Ms Popper worked out of Hazard for the Forest Service one summer back in the Eighties. Boy, does she have some stories about that! So I asked her if she'd seen the Mother Goose House, and she said yes and she has some pictures somewhere. I hope they get it back together. Stuff like that is not getting any more plentiful.
 

charliebrown

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I ran across a History Channel program about Fort Knox, Kentucky.

To make a long story short, nobody really knows what is stored in the vaults.

Being an ultra secret place, it is not known if gold is even there.

Any congress people who visit are only shown locker 13 which does have some gold in it, but no other parts of the underground city.

It was suggested Fort Knox is a good place for America’s secrets, like dead aliens and UFOs.

Sounds logical to me.
 
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charliebrown

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From a Ancient Aliens History Channel program, an idea brought up was that no outsiders ever go into Fort Knox, Kentucky.

The underground city has far more room than needed for gold.

It would be a great place to store crashed UFOs and dead aliens.

Even presidents or congress members are very rarely let in to look around.

It would be funny if there was no gold at Fort Knox.
 
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feinman

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From a Ancient Aliens History Channel program, an idea brought up was that no outsiders ever go into Fort Knox, Kentucky.

The underground city has far more room than needed for gold.

It would be a great place to store crashed UFOs and dead aliens.

Even presidents or congress members are very rarely let in to look around.

It would be funny if there was no gold at Fort Knox.
I think there is possibly debris at Wright-Patterson AFB, and some in the possession of Battelle Corporation and perhaps at some off-limits military installations.
 

Dinobot

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I ran across a History Channel program about Fort Knox, Kentucky.

To make a long story short, nobody really knows what is stored in the vaults.

Being an ultra secret place, it is not known if gold is even there.

Any congress people who visit are only shown locker 13 which does have some gold in it, but no other parts of the underground city.

It was suggested Fort Knox is a good place for America’s secrets, like dead aliens and UFOs.


Sounds logical to me.
Every other locker there contains clones of Rynner..
 
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