Koolakamba

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Anonymous

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Has anyone here ever heard about a creature called the Koolakamba? I know you are all going to hate me for this but i just recently visited Rickys new forum thinking i was going to read a bunch of made up creature storys and UFO sightings but i was pleasantly suprised when i read his Oliver thread in his Crypto section of his Forum.
He has said that Oliver the Ape was a Koolakamba and has a few pictures of him which isnt new but he has another picture of a different ape which is black where as oliver had a white looking face and his theory is that this ape which is known as the Cameroon Ape is from the same species. They do look amazingly similar which does give rise to the thought are these apes a new species of unknow ape? could it be the ape recently discovered that is thought to be half chimp half gorilla?
It is well worth a look if you find this interesting, hopefully the forum he has created doesnt turn into a flame fest.
 

DerekH16

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I thought Oliver had recently been proved to be a chimp, or did I get it wrong again? :(
 
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well i think what the scientists where doing is seeing if Oliver had any human in him which he didnt. They said he was more likely to be an Chimp but not that he was simply a common Chimp, this could include a sub species which i think is likely after what ive recently read.
 

evilsprout

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Oliver was proven to be nothing more than a deformed chimpanzee, trained to act in certain ways for the circus (if I remember rightly).

Though of course Big Charlie F taught us to beware of scientific "proof"... there was one theory that Oliver was a wildman from the area he was found in, or a chimp/wildman cross. I can't remember the name of the actual wildman legend in that area, so it could well have been Koolakamba.

Other theories about Oliver were human/chimp cross, chimp/bonobo cross and Downs Syndrome chimp.
 
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If that is true EvilSprout then explain why a ape that looked and acted exactly the same way as oliver was found living in a zoo in cameroon. I doubt a circus can teach a creature to always walk on 2 legs, yes its possible to teach an animal to walk on 2 legs for a while but oliver always walked on 2 legs and never used his arms at all.
The scientific evidence says he is a chimp but this doesnt mean that he is a common chimp, it means that he belongs to the chimp family and he could be a subspecies which i would say is a possibility due to the discovery of the Cameroon Ape.
 

evilsprout

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Like I said, I was not 100% certain if my memory served me correctly about Oliver's "diagnosis". I'll seek out relevent information and return to this thread...!
 

evilsprout

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...ok, a rather in depth page about the Koolakamba here first off, which does sound rather Oliver-esque I have to agree.

Karl Shuker's FT article about Oliver's "results" is here...

(here's the science bit, concentrate...)

Swett asked Chicago University geneticist Dr David Ledbetter to examine Oliver's chromosomes, which he did in autumn 1996. His studies revealed that Oliver had 48, not 47, chromosomes, thus disproving the earlier claim and confirming that he had a normal chromosome count for a chimpanzee. Swett, however, desired further analyses to pin-point Oliver's precise status. Accordingly, he persuaded DNA analysis expert Dr John fly from Texas's Trinity University and cytogeneticist Dr Charleen Moore from Texas University's Health Science Center to conduct the most extensive genetic studies ever undertaken with Oliver. Their results were published in 1998 by the American Journal of Physical Anthropology and disclosed the following.

Standard chromosomal studies fully supported Ledbetter's findings that Oliver had the diploid chromesome count expected for chimpanzees (i.e. 48 or 24 pairs). They also revealed that his chromosomes possessed banding patterns typical for the common chimpanzee but different from those of humans and bonobos, thereby excluding any possibility of Oliver being a hybrid.

Moreover, when they sequenced a specific portion (312 bp region) of the D-loop region of Oliver's mitochondrial DNA they discovered that its sequence corresponded very closely indeed with that of the Central African subspecies of common chimpanzee; the closest correspondence of all was with a chimp specimen from Gabon in Central-West Africa. This all strongly suggests that Oliver also originated from this region and is simply a common chimp - an identity entirely consistent, therefore, with my own little-publicised opinion from 1993.

After decades of mystery, Oliver's identity had finally been uncovered, exposed by his genes. But what of his external idiosyncrasies? Fly and Moore's paper contained some eye-opening infermation dating back to the 1970s, but which was presumably not sensational enough to attract the interest of the media and thus had not previously received publicity.

For instance, although media accounts had noted that Oliver was toothless (his teeth had been pulled), they had not revealed that primatologist Dr Clifford Jolly had examined Oliver as long ago as 1976. Jolly found that Oliver did not share the strikingly prognathous (projecting) jaw line of other chimps due to resorption of the alveolar bone, a shortened maxilla and premaxilla (upper jaw bones), and underdeveloped temporal musculature. Jolly had concluded that these features were in turn caused by Oliver's toothless condition. He also concluded that Oliver's habitual bipedal gait was due to conditioning.

As for Oliver's cranial morphology, ear shape, freckles and baldness, these were nothing more than individual variations, well within the range of variability exhibited by the common chimpanzee - a species that presents, in the words of primatologist Professor W.C. Osman Hill: "a bewildering variety of individual variations".

But, always beware of the scientific "proof". I'd still say the Koolakamba theory could be valid.
 
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