Large Snakes

Yithian

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I've temporarily mislaid the source, but I read recently a discussion between a vet and a snake expert, and they concluded that we are likely to see larger snakes in the future.

Apparently, one of the most common issues with pet/captive snakes is lack of appetite, partly caused by the carefully controlled range of temperatures in which they are kept (overfeeding isn't much of an issue, apparently—they just ignore the excess).

In the wild, however—snakes being cold-blooded, of course—a rise in the temperature of their habitat will increase the speed of their metabolism and trigger larger appetites: the more they eat, the more they grow.

Whether this is good or bad news is largely subjective.
 

EnolaGaia

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Here's an excerpt from Charles Gould's Mythical Monsters concerning giant snakes in the Mallee area.

malle-mindi-snake.jpg
SOURCE: https://books.google.com/books?id=9...D#v=onepage&q=mallee snake OR serpent&f=false
 

EnolaGaia

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Here's another massive one caught in Florida:

A Giant 185-Pound Florida Python May Be the New State Record


A new record has been set for the largest (invasive Burmese) python captured in Florida.

FL-LargestPython-2206.jpg
Largest python ever found in Florida is 18 feet long and weighs a whopping 200 pounds

The largest Burmese python ever seen in Florida has been discovered, lured out of its hiding place in the Everglades by researchers who used another python as bait ...

The gargantuan snake was a female, measuring nearly 18 feet (5.4 meters) long and weighing 215 pounds (97 kilograms) — 30 pounds (13.6 kg) more than the next-largest python ever found in the state. Most Burmese pythons (Python bivittatus) that are found in Florida range between 6 and 10 feet (1.8 and 3 m) long, although in their native habitats in Southeast Asia, the snakes commonly reach 18 feet long (5.4 m) and the largest can reach lengths of 20 feet (6 m) or more ...

Since being introduced in Florida in the 1970s, the invasive pythons have bred successfully in the southern regions of the state, where they prey on many native birds and mammals, as well as the occasional alligator or pet dog. ...
FULL STORY (With Photos & Video): https://www.livescience.com/largest-python-in-florida-found
 

Yithian

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Coal

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I don't want to seem excessively sentimental about a problematic invasive species, but there's no explanation as to why they killed her after going to such lengths to capture her.

I confess I was rather dismayed at the resolution.
I thought there was a bounty on them?
 

EnolaGaia

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I thought there was a bounty on them?

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) has multiple programs dedicated to locating and eradicating invasive pythons. Access to information on these programs can be found starting at:

Burmese Pythons in Florida
https://myfwc.com/wildlifehabitats/nonnatives/python/

Folks who register as contractors for the Python Action Team program are reimbursed for time spent doing surveys plus a bounty for each python captured / killed. These registered contractors are the only ones paid any standard fees for their eradication activities. In addition ...

Cash prizes are awarded for the general Florida Python Challenge event (in 2022, scheduled for August).
 

Sharon Hill

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I don't want to seem excessively sentimental about a problematic invasive species, but there's no explanation as to why they killed her after going to such lengths to capture her.

I confess I was rather dismayed at the resolution.
They are severely affecting the fragile Everglades ecosystem and breeding. They have overtaken the allligator and Florida panther as top predators of the native wildlife. The death of this female with 122 eggs will be a small disruption in the propagation of this invasive species.

Their impact on the environment has been dramatic as they are competing with native wildlife for food. USGS reports:

"The most severe declines in native species have occurred in the remote southernmost regions of Everglades National Park, where pythons have been established the longest. In a 2012 study, populations of raccoons had dropped 99.3 percent, opossums 98.9 percent, and bobcats 87.5 percent since 1997. Marsh rabbits, cottontail rabbits, and foxes effectively disappeared." https://www.usgs.gov/faqs/how-have-invasive-pythons-impacted-florida-ecosystems

But, I wonder, if this was the largest Burmese python caught in the wild in Florida, wasn't it really the largest in North America? I mean, there aren't any other places in the US where tropical snakes are getting out of hand, and the Burmese python is one of the largest. (Green anacondas are also habituating in Florida but not as common.)
 
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