Loch Ness Itself (The Loch And Its Immediate Environs)

rynner2

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#1
Not about Nessie, but this could be a problem for monster hunters:

Language barrier in Loch Ness
A Black Country couple running a hotel near Loch Ness are trying to recruit workers to follow them to Scotland because many of their guests are finding it difficult to understand the local accent.
Hazel and Nicholas Hammond, who are originally from Bloxwich, West Midlands, now run the Glenmoriston Arms in the Highlands.

Many holidaymakers from the West Midlands are attracted to the hotel, which specialises in golfing and fishing holidays.

But Mr and Mrs Hammond, who say even they have to listen carefully to grasp the local dialect, are worried that some of their guests are being put off by the language barrier.

Mrs Hammond said they have been having serious problem with recruiting any staff to work in the £100-a-night hotel.
They describe the local accent as 'coarse', but many others might feel that a Black Country accent is not exactly mellifluous! :D
 
A

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#2
rynner said:
They describe the local accent as 'coarse', but many others might feel that a Black Country accent is not exactly mellifluous! :D
Well, considering how well spoken they are up in the north of Scotland, I'm guessing they'd probably have the same problem if they moved to Oxford.

Unless, of course, the locals are putting it on purely to wind them up. ;)
 

Cavynaut

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#3
If I was offered up market bed and breakfast for £100 a night, my language would be 'coarse' too!
 

Anome

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#4
I'm hoping I'll get to Inverness and the Loch during my tour. I can't wait to see if I can get a photo of a floating log, or even a Morris Minor bumper bar.
 

Cavynaut

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#5
Anome, make sure you get to the monster exhibition in Drumnadrochit. There's a bloody good bar there as well, well it was good twenty years ago, around 40 different whiskeys on offer!
 

Anome

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#6
Cavynaut said:
Anome, make sure you get to the monster exhibition in Drumnadrochit. There's a bloody good bar there as well, well it was good twenty years ago, around 40 different whiskeys on offer!
So I can sit there, staring at the whiskeys and thinking "You know, if I still drank, and I actually liked whiskey, I could have a grand old time here."

Still, the monster exhibition might be interesting.
 

Cavynaut

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#7
... in that case, Castle Urquhart is nearby.
 

Anome

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#9
Re: But Wait

FraterLibre said:
You can not drink it and still like whisky, though.
Maybe, but, having drunk whiskey (or was it whisky, can't remember) way back when I did actually drink (a long time ago), I can say that I don't care for it.

Therefore, I not only don't drink it, but I also don't like it.
 

kevin_latch

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#11
Hi everyone,

I hear contradictory stories with regard to the depth of the loch (anything from 700ft to over 1000ft); does anybody know if a reliable depth has been established?

In the many books about the monster I have read a few of them have made reference to vast cathedral-size caverns under the loch; again does anybody know if there is any veracity to this?

Thanks,
 

OldTimeRadio

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#12
I once saw an illustration showing the Eiffel Tower stuck down into the Loch and at least 40 percent of the Tower remained above water.
 

Pietro_Mercurios

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#13
OldTimeRadio said:
I once saw an illustration showing the Eiffel Tower stuck down into the Loch and at least 40 percent of the Tower remained above water.
It must have been standing in the shallow end. ;)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Loch_Ness

...

Loch Ness is the second largest Scottish loch by surface area at 56.4 km2 (21.8 sq mi) but due to its extreme depth is the largest by volume. The loch contains more fresh water than all that in England and Wales combined. At its deepest part, 248 m (813 feet), London's BT Tower at 189 m (620 feet) would be completely submerged.

...
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eiffel_Tower

The Eiffel Tower ... is 324 m (1063 ft) high (since 2000) which is about 81 stories. In 1902, it was struck by lightning, which caused builders to reconstruct 300 feet of the top.

...
 

OldTimeRadio

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#14
So if the Eiffel Tower were to be placed into the deepest part of the Loch it would still stick out by some 250 feet?
 

stu neville

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#15
..about 25%. See? You're getting an extra 15% depth for free! And all this from the Scots (grab it while you can, before they come to their senses :).)

It's basically a steep-sided mountain gorge that's full of water. As I understand it a cross section would be almost V-shaped, so the actual bed is quite narrow.
 

Pietro_Mercurios

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#16
stuneville said:
..about 25%. See? You're getting an extra 15% depth for free! And all this from the Scots (grab it while you can, before they come to their senses :).)

It's basically a steep-sided mountain gorge that's full of water. As I understand it a cross section would be almost V-shaped, so the actual bed is quite narrow.
There is a lot of scree, clay and silt on the bottom. That levels it out a bit.

It's a massive geological fault, caused by the rubbing of two tectonic plates. A bit like the San Andreas Fault, only older and gouged out by Ice Age glaciers. :)
 

ruffready

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#17
why use the Eiffel Tower ? Use the Empire state building. And I don't eat snails. :blah: or frogs.
 

Stanforda

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#18
Didn't a guy recently walk half way across the bottom of the Loch, in traditional-weighed diving gear?
 
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#19
I recall seeing a few years ago a picture of what Loch Ness might look like if completely drained of water (having used sonar scans to establish geographical features).

It was an incredibly impressive picture, but I can't for the life of me find it on the net (where I originally found it); does this picture ring any bells with anybody? Does anyone know where it might be found?

Cheers....
 

WhistlingJack

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#20
I've found these, if they're any use (no further details, unfortunately):-

Photo links are long dead. Here ia N illustration of the loch's bed (based on sonar scanning), which may or may not be the same as any originally posted here.

LochNessBed-A.jpg
 
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#21
Wow, thanks very much for that, whistlingjack! Yes, that was very similar to what I remember. Very interesting, aren't they?

Again, thanks very much for sharing those!

Regards....
 

kerravon

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#22
I remember someone once commenting that if we drained Loch Ness, we'd find either a dead Nessie, or no Nessie, either way most people would probably prefer to remain ignorant.

I also remember some form of illustration, perhaps alongside the comment above?
 
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#23
Yes Karravon, that is the picture that I was referring to, but the images that WhistlingJack has kindly posted give a good indication of what the loch looks like; incredibly steep sides and a flat bottom.

Draining the loch would of course be out of the question; for a start, where would you put such a large body of water? And what of the environmental damage to the loch and animals living in it?

Like you, although I think there is abundant evidence to suggest that there are some kind of unknown creatures in the loch, I hope in a way that we never find out, just to perpetuate the mystery! As long as the odd photo or sonar scan of something weird is released every now and then, leave the creatures alone!
 

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#28
Having been there as a kid, I can testify to Nessie's ability to transmogrify into a million midges.
 

lordmongrove

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#29
"There were several glimpses of the creature when it was a tea room"

Nessie's shape-shifting abilities have been underestimated
The tanuki or racoon dog was said to have sghape shifting testicles in Japanese folklore. In one story a tanuki disguises his testicles as a tea room and some men come in to drink tea. One drops hot as by accident and singes the tanuki's balls.
 
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