Medical Mysteries, Bizarre Cases

Ermintruder

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PEG is used as a wood preservative and also as a laxative. And now a way of fixing severed nerves?
:huh:
Reportedly this is because of the biochemical universality of Polyethylene glycol's excipient characteristics.

An excipient is a substance formulated alongside the active ingredient of a medication, included for the purpose of long-term stabilization, bulking up solid formulations that contain potent active ingredients (thus often referred to as "bulking agents", "fillers", or "diluents"), or to confer a therapeutic enhancement on the active ingredient in the final dosage form, such as facilitating drug absorption, reducing viscosity, or enhancing solubility
So it's a channel-enhancing nanoscopic cell-splicer.

From within the main text of the head-swap article:

Cells within the spinal cord don’t grow back, but chemicals such as peg (PEG) can fuse cells, breaking open their membranes and forcing them to glom together into a larger, hybrid cell.
 

EnolaGaia

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Solving this medical mystery required attention to more than pathology testing, biochemistry, etc. It seems to be that a specific pattern of eating behavior was the missing puzzle piece needed to explain this recurring, and recurrently fatal, children's illness.

Deadly Fruit: Cause of Mysterious Brain Illness in India is Found

The mystery of why hundreds of children in an Indian city become sick every summer with a deadly brain illness has been solved, researchers say.

According to a new report, the cause of the illness appears to be the lychee fruit, which is grown widely in orchards in the city of Muzaffarpur, where the illnesses occur. Critically, the children who get sick often eat the fruit on an empty stomach, which contributes to the development of the illness, the researchers said. ...

Since 1995, there have been reports of children in Muzaffarpur suddenly falling ill and having seizures, usually in the morning hours, according to The New York Times. Often these children would slip into a coma, and about 40 percent died, the Times said. Outbreaks of these illnesses usually begin in mid-May and end in July, around the same time that lychee fruits are harvested.

Despite many earlier investigations, researchers struggled to confirm the cause of these illnesses.

In the new study, the researchers analyzed nearly 400 cases of children who developed this mysterious brain illness in 2014, and compared these cases with about 100 children who didn't have this illness.

An analysis of blood and spinal fluid samples from the children with the brain illness showed that the children did not have signs of an infection, nor were they exposed to pesticides. But most of these children had consumed lychee fruit shortly before becoming ill. In fact, the results showed that children with the brain illness were nearly 10 times more likely to have eaten lychee, and six times more likely to have visited a fruit orchard, in the 24 hours before they became ill, compared with children who didn't develop the illness.

What's more, a study of urine samples showed that two-thirds of the sick children had evidence of exposure to two toxins found in lychee seeds called hypoglycin and methylenecyclopropyl glycine. These toxins are found in higher levels in unripe fruit.

Because many people can eat lychee fruit and not become sick, the researchers suspected that another factor was involved: eating the fruit on an empty stomach.

Results showed that children who developed the brain illness were twice as likely to have skipped their dinner, compared with those who didn't develop the illness. Many of the sick children had very low blood sugar levels, and other signs of problems with their metabolism.

The researchers said that when children skipped their evening meal, their blood sugar levels dropped. When this happens, the body would normally start to metabolize fatty acids to produce glucose. But toxins from the lychees disrupted the metabolism of fatty acids, leading to extremely low blood sugar levels and brain inflammation in the children, the researchers said.

The need for these two events to occur together could explain why only some children in the area developed the illness, even though many children ate the fruit. ...

SOURCE: http://www.livescience.com/57709-lychee-brain-illness-children-india.html
 

Xanatic*

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Incidentally, can anyone recommend a good book on bizarre illnesses and ailments?
 

rynner2

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This brave mum is having surgery because her skull is too small for her brain
By CturnerHerald | Posted: February 22, 2017
Video:

Lucy Phillips was just 26 years old when she was told she had a rare condition which means her brain is too big for her skull.
Over the past two years, she has undergone several surgeries in the hope of relieving the excruciating pressure building up in the base of her brain and spine, but nothing has yet worked.

The now 29-year-old is hoping to raise awareness of her condition, Chiari malformation, which is where the lower part of the brain pushes down into the spinal canal putting pressure on the brainstem, spinal cord, and obstructing the flow of fluid.

Lucy began getting shooting pains in her body and became increasingly tired – she had thought she was overworked having just opened her own salon, Purity, in Plympton.

Doctors put it down to sciatica and gave her a prescription for diazepam, but she began deteriorating and was sent for an MRI scan.

The mum of two said: "Doctors thought I had MS after the scans as I had similar symptoms.
"It got worse and worse, I had tiredness, it felt like someone was stabbing me and as if spiders were running over me. There was constant ringing in my ears and I always had a thumping headache.
"Then a neurologist said they were confident I didn't have MS but no one really knew much about Chiara malformation – my GP gave me a leaflet and told me the signs and symptoms of the condition would go away within a few weeks.
"My nerve endings were being blocked because the tonsils of my brain were pushing into my spinal chord which gave me intense pressure behind my eyes and in my head."

It took eight months for specialists to find out what was happening to Lucy, and she was finally put into the care of Mr Hayden, the consultant neurologist at Derriford Hospital.

"No one had answers; I was scared and wouldn't let my children see me poorly – I wouldn't want them to remember me in that state," the young business owner added.

Lucy's first surgery was decompression where the back of her skull was opened – surgeons removed the muscles under neath her brain and chiselled a 50p piece out of her skull to allow for her brain to sit further up rather than pushing down on her spine.
After the seven hour procedure, Lucy stayed in hospital for a week with a drip in the back of her brain.

She had thought the major surgery had worked – but she began to get a build up of spinal fluid, meaning she would need further operations and investigations to relieve the pressure.
Lucy then had three lumbar punctures at the base of her spine to drain the excess fluid, but they were unsuccessful.

The Plympton resident was re-admitted to Derriford for a two day inter cranial test on February 19. Lucy had a hole drilled into the top of her skull and a wire threaded into her brain to monitor the pressure, which was thirty to fifty times higher than a regular person's when she moved her head.

Lucy was told the condition would have formed she was a foetus, and that type one Chiari malformation symptoms don't usually show until late teens up to 30s.
Lucy said: "A lot of things make sense now - when I was a teen in the navy I would have back spasms and couldn't move, but I never got my head scanned.
"During both of my pregnancies with Oscar and Charles I was poorly but no one knew what was wrong.
"It [Chiari malformation] can be passed down – it is a bit of a concern. Oscar has had a scan but has no signs yet and doctors are pretty confident he doesn't have it.

"It does affect our home life and the children ask why I'm always poorly.
"My body wont let me do little things anymore and I can't function in the mornings – I get up super early so I can at least say morning to them."

Lucy will find out on March 1 when her next surgery will be; she is due to have an invasive lumbar– peritoneal shunt where a tube will be inserted behind her ear, fed down her spinal chord and into her stomach.
Consultants hope this will finally relieve the pressure in Lucy's brain long term – but it will take her between three and six months to recover from the major op.

Now, the brave mum of two is hoping to raise awareness of the rare condition and has urged people to carry on and not give up in finding the right help.
Lucy praises the Ann Conroy Trust for helping her through her diagnoses – they were there to answer her phone calls, explain medical terms from hospital letters and give guidance about the condition which she hadn't been able to find elsewhere.
Lucy and staff at her salon in Ridgeway raised over £1,200 for the charity who put the funds back into helping those living with the brain malformation.

Lucy says the support she has received from friends and family has been amazing, and has thanked the girls at her salon for keeping it open in her absence.

Read more at http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/ply...0152874-detail/story.html#Ug9qPybQhPcehmtY.99

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/ply...or-her-brain/story-30152874-detail/story.html
 

Naughty_Felid

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This brave mum is having surgery because her skull is too small for her brain
By CturnerHerald | Posted: February 22, 2017
Video:

Lucy Phillips was just 26 years old when she was told she had a rare condition which means her brain is too big for her skull.
Over the past two years, she has undergone several surgeries in the hope of relieving the excruciating pressure building up in the base of her brain and spine, but nothing has yet worked.

The now 29-year-old is hoping to raise awareness of her condition, Chiari malformation, which is where the lower part of the brain pushes down into the spinal canal putting pressure on the brainstem, spinal cord, and obstructing the flow of fluid.

Lucy began getting shooting pains in her body and became increasingly tired – she had thought she was overworked having just opened her own salon, Purity, in Plympton.

Doctors put it down to sciatica and gave her a prescription for diazepam, but she began deteriorating and was sent for an MRI scan.

The mum of two said: "Doctors thought I had MS after the scans as I had similar symptoms.
"It got worse and worse, I had tiredness, it felt like someone was stabbing me and as if spiders were running over me. There was constant ringing in my ears and I always had a thumping headache.
"Then a neurologist said they were confident I didn't have MS but no one really knew much about Chiara malformation – my GP gave me a leaflet and told me the signs and symptoms of the condition would go away within a few weeks.
"My nerve endings were being blocked because the tonsils of my brain were pushing into my spinal chord which gave me intense pressure behind my eyes and in my head."

It took eight months for specialists to find out what was happening to Lucy, and she was finally put into the care of Mr Hayden, the consultant neurologist at Derriford Hospital.

"No one had answers; I was scared and wouldn't let my children see me poorly – I wouldn't want them to remember me in that state," the young business owner added.

Lucy's first surgery was decompression where the back of her skull was opened – surgeons removed the muscles under neath her brain and chiselled a 50p piece out of her skull to allow for her brain to sit further up rather than pushing down on her spine.
After the seven hour procedure, Lucy stayed in hospital for a week with a drip in the back of her brain.

She had thought the major surgery had worked – but she began to get a build up of spinal fluid, meaning she would need further operations and investigations to relieve the pressure.
Lucy then had three lumbar punctures at the base of her spine to drain the excess fluid, but they were unsuccessful.

The Plympton resident was re-admitted to Derriford for a two day inter cranial test on February 19. Lucy had a hole drilled into the top of her skull and a wire threaded into her brain to monitor the pressure, which was thirty to fifty times higher than a regular person's when she moved her head.

Lucy was told the condition would have formed she was a foetus, and that type one Chiari malformation symptoms don't usually show until late teens up to 30s.
Lucy said: "A lot of things make sense now - when I was a teen in the navy I would have back spasms and couldn't move, but I never got my head scanned.
"During both of my pregnancies with Oscar and Charles I was poorly but no one knew what was wrong.
"It [Chiari malformation] can be passed down – it is a bit of a concern. Oscar has had a scan but has no signs yet and doctors are pretty confident he doesn't have it.

"It does affect our home life and the children ask why I'm always poorly.
"My body wont let me do little things anymore and I can't function in the mornings – I get up super early so I can at least say morning to them."

Lucy will find out on March 1 when her next surgery will be; she is due to have an invasive lumbar– peritoneal shunt where a tube will be inserted behind her ear, fed down her spinal chord and into her stomach.
Consultants hope this will finally relieve the pressure in Lucy's brain long term – but it will take her between three and six months to recover from the major op.

Now, the brave mum of two is hoping to raise awareness of the rare condition and has urged people to carry on and not give up in finding the right help.
Lucy praises the Ann Conroy Trust for helping her through her diagnoses – they were there to answer her phone calls, explain medical terms from hospital letters and give guidance about the condition which she hadn't been able to find elsewhere.
Lucy and staff at her salon in Ridgeway raised over £1,200 for the charity who put the funds back into helping those living with the brain malformation.

Lucy says the support she has received from friends and family has been amazing, and has thanked the girls at her salon for keeping it open in her absence.

Read more at http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/ply...0152874-detail/story.html#Ug9qPybQhPcehmtY.99

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/ply...or-her-brain/story-30152874-detail/story.html
Weird I actually know a guy with this condition.
 

Naughty_Felid

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I think I might have met someone with that in the 80s, he had a very strangely flat head, in the sideways dimension, that he was waiting for an operation for... never really asked him about it.
The guy I know looks normal,. he just suddenly started passing out and was eventually scanned. They are still looking at options.
 

rynner2

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Hairdresser Kandi du Cros died after breast implant operation flared up rare existing disease
By Oli_Vergnault | Posted: May 08, 2017

A St Austell hairdresser is likely to have died after breast implant surgery caused the flare-up of an extremely rare disease which in turn led to a catastrophic organ failure, an inquest heard.

Kandi du Cros was admitted to Royal Cornwall Hospital (RCH) at Treliske in January 2014 after her health started to deteriorate rapidly with flu-like symptoms, high fever and pain.

In a statement to the inquest at Truro, Kandi's husband Ray said she became so unwell the week before being admitted to hospital that she spent a whole day on the sofa, which was "so unlike her", and even asked friends on Facebook to take their son Bailey to school, which again he said was "so unlike Kandi".

Once admitted to hospital Mr du Cros said Denise, his wife's mother, had to repeatedly remind medical staff at the hospital of her allergy to penicillin.
In his statement, he said that at some point while in hospital, Kandi, 32, felt so poorly she even told her mother Denise that "she felt like she was being poisoned".

The inquest into the death of the mother-of-one heard how she was diagnosed in 2004 with a very rare auto immune condition known as mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). The condition can lead to joint pains, skin abnormalities, muscle weakness and internal organ problems. It is so rare that staff at RCH only see 10 to 20 cases a year.
Known as an overlap disease because it has the signs and symptoms of a combination of disorders, it can sometimes be interpreted as something else and is identified by abnormal antibodies in the blood.

The inquest heard that Kandi had led a full healthy life and did not need treatment for the condition.
However two months prior to her death she had breast implants at the private Duchy Hospital which her condition did not prevent her from having.

The inquest heard that the surgery was understood to have triggered her dormant condition which led in turn to a rise in abnormal antibodies and anti-coagulants in her body. As result small clots started forming in some of her organs and led to a complete organ shut down.

David Hutchinson, a consultant rheumatologist who treated Kandi at Treliske from the moment she was admitted on January 17, 2014, until her death two days later, said that while there was no indication the silicon in the breast implants had caused some allergic reaction or infection which led to her death, it was "highly likely" the trauma of the operation itself had flared up her genetic condition.

In turn her heart, liver and spleen shut down over the next two days. Dr Hutchinson said transporting her to a London hospital was even considered by staff at RCH so she could receive a heart transplant after her heart started failing, but he said Kandi would not have survived the trip.

In the end, the Hammersmith-born hairdresser fell into a coma and her husband had to take the heart-breaking decision to switch off her life support machine. :(

Dr Hutchinson told the inquest sepsis and fungal infection could be ruled out as triggers for the multiple organ failure.
He said: "I don't think there is a direct link between the breast augmentation and Mrs du Clos's death however the surgery procedure is highly likely to have led to a flare up of her condition and a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and eventually to multiple organ failures."

In his evidence, Ray said: "Should there have been more tests done into Kandi's tissue disease before she had a breast implant operations? I don't think the severity of her condition was fully appreciated and the right treatment was put in place at the time she was in hospital."

The three-day inquest is expected to finish on Wednesday (May 10) following two days of evidence from medical experts.

http://www.cornwalllive.com/hairdre...ting-disease/story-30319305-detail/story.html

What a sad tale. The photo of Kandi on the page shows a lively and apparently healthy young woman.
 

rynner2

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Final verdict:
St Austell hairdresser Kandi Du Cros died from sepsis and not a direct result of breast augmentation
By Shannon_Hards | Posted: May 10, 2017

The death of a St Austell hairdresser, was not 'directly associated' with breast augmentation surgery she had in the weeks before she died, an inquest has heard.

Kandi du Cros, a 32-year-old mother, died of multiple organ failure caused by sepsis in January 2014, the coroner's court in Truro heard, as coroner Dr Emma Carlyon gave her verdict.

Kandi developed a fever and vomiting a couple of weeks after breast surgery she had undergone in the private Duchy Hospital in Truro.
She became so unwell she had to be admitted to the Royal Cornwall Hospital, where she died two days later.

...

In her conclusion, coroner Dr Emma Carlyon said: "Kandi du Cros had a quiescent auto immune disease (SLE). She was admitted to the Royal Cornwall Hospital on January 16, 2014 with evidence of sepsis.
"Despite investigation, no source for the sepsis was identified. She was treated with a broad spectrum of antibiotics, steroids and immunoglobulin therapy [a mixture of antibodies].
"Despite medical intervention she died on January 19, 2014. The post-mortem identified invasive pulmonary candida and no other source of infection.

"Kandi du Cros had undergone aspiration of ranula and breast augmentation surgery where she was given antibiotics which were considered to atypically and unexpectedly affect her microbiological flora.
"She developed a fungal infection and sepsis and exacerbation of her existing autoimmune disease which led to her death."

She continued: "My conclusion as to the death is that I accept the evidence of Dr Stolte, Dr Hutchinson, Dr Hill and Dr Ashton-cleary that she died as a consequence of sepsis.
"I have not found any evidence that this death was directly associated with previous procedures. I therefore find it probable that is more likely than not that Kandi Denise du Cros died from overwhelming sepsis against a background of autoimmune disease, antibiotic therapy and surgery."

Dr Carlyon gave the cause of death as 1A multiple organ failure, 1B sepsis, 1C pulmonary candidiasis, part two SLE (autoimmune disease), surgical procedure and antibiotic treatment.
Dr Carlyon also noted that the Duchy Hospital at Truro had carried out a review following Kandi's death and carried out tests to eliminate contamination concerns in the operating theatre, where Kandi had her surgery.

She also expressed her condolences to Kandi's family and thanked the medical professionals for attending with their evidence.

http://www.cornwalllive.com/st-aust...augmentation/story-30324961-detail/story.html
 

rynner2

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This man has been living with someone else's heart for 30 years
By CturnerHerald | Posted: June 12, 2017

A man from Plymouth is celebrating 30 years since having a heart transplant – despite being told the organ would only last him a maximum of 10 years.

Paul Hayman says he takes each day as it comes and stays as relaxed as he possibly can – adding that his laid back nature could be one of the reasons his heart has continued to stay healthy.

Celebrating both his 50th birthday and the 30th anniversary of his transplant in December, Paul urges people to consider donating their organs – as without his new heart, he believes he would have been dead the same year he was rushed to Cambridge for the major operation in 1987.

It was after he collapsed at school in a badminton lesson at the age of 15 when Paul was referred for various tests, which discovered he had been struck down with a serious and rare heart condition which made the organ four times its normal size.

Paul appeared on the front page of The Herald in 1987 on the day he underwent an operation which he said "saved his life".
The Honicknowle resident visited the Papworth Hospital in Cambridgeshire (where he was given the life saving transplant) last year. Whilst there, doctors told Paul that there were "not many like him" who had survived for so long and that it was "uncharted territory".

Paul's surgery was carried out by Sir Terence English, the man who performed Britain's first ever successful heart transplant.
"I've been really really lucky, I do have to pinch myself each day as I can't comprehend that I'm still here," said Paul.
"Getting this heart was the greatest gift anyone in the world could receive, it's a miracle.
"Everyday I think 'it's another day' and get on with it, I keep myself well and take it all in my stride."

Despite having successful heart surgery, Paul's life has not been without its challenges.
....

And, at the age of 37, Paul's kidneys began to fail.
But, following six years on dialysis and two years waiting on the transplant list, he finally found a donor and had successful surgery at Derriford Hospital.

Paul previously told The Herald: "Being on dialysis for six years was one of the hardest things I've ever had to do. It's all down to the staff at Derriford, Papworth, and my family and friends that I'm alive today.
"Organ donation is so important and perhaps if the law was changed to an opt-out system there would be a lot more people like myself who would still be alive."

http://www.plymouthherald.co.uk/ply...nt-this-year/story-30377035-detail/story.html
 
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Brain Worm!

Brain-Invading Tapeworm That Eluded Doctors Spotted by New DNA Test
Genetic sequencing of spinal fluid hailed as an advance over standard procedures for diagnosing brain infections
By Kat McGowan on June 22, 2017

Doctors at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital could not figure out what was wrong with the 29-year-old man sitting before them. An otherwise healthy construction worker from Nicaragua, the patient was suffering from a splitting headache, double vision and ringing in his ears. Part of his face was also numb. The cause could have been anything—from an infection to a stroke, a tumor or some kind of autoimmune disease. The Emergency Department (ED) staff took a magnetic resonance imaging scan of the man’s brain, performed a spinal tap and completed a series of other tests that did not turn up any obvious reason for the swelling in his brain—a condition that is formally known as encephalitis.

Most likely, it was some kind of infection. But what kind? Nineteen standard tests are available to help clinicians try to pin down the source of encephalitis, but they test for the presence of only the most common infections; more than 60 percent of cases go unsolved each year.Physicians looked in the patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (which surrounds the brain and protects it) for evidence of Lyme disease, syphilis and valley fever, among other things. Nothing matched. So the S.F. General ED staff settled on the most likely culprit as a diagnosis: a form of tuberculosis (TB) that causes brain inflammation but cannot always be detected with typical tests. Doctors gave the man a prescription for some steroids to reduce the swelling plus some anti-TB drugs and sent him home.

Soon he was back, however, with the same symptoms. This time the physicians assumed the man, whose life was chaotic, had not been taking his drugs properly. (Even people with regular jobs and schedules often find taking TB medications fairly difficult.) The ED staff sent him away with another prescription but he returned again and again—even after he could prove that he was taking his medication correctly and on time. The drugs helped briefly after each visit, but the symptoms always returned. During that year his medical bills reached $580,000. Finally, S.F. General turned to an experimental test that is designed to uncover the source of virtually any neurological infection. ...

https://www.scientificamerican.com/...-that-eluded-doctors-spotted-by-new-dna-test/
 

rynner2

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False widow spider bite led to life-threatening infection
5 July 2017

A man left critically ill after being bitten by a spider hidden in a bunch of bananas says A&E staff saved his life.
Paul Jory, 59, was bitten by a three-inch arachnid, thought to be a false widow, in the living room of his home in St Albans on 5 May.
He says his arm developed a swelling the size of a golf ball and he was put in an induced coma as his body fought a life-threatening infection.
"Without the care I received, I'd be dead," he told the BBC.

The father-of-one has undergone eight operations since the infection and has been left with 40% movement in his right arm.
From descriptions he gave, Mr Jory believes he may have been bitten by a venomous false widow spider.

...

Mr Jory, the managing director of a marketing firm in Hertfordshire, went to Watford General hospital, where the last thing he remembers is being put on a "wheelie bed". He was placed in an induced coma - and spent almost five weeks in hospital.
He developed a flesh-eating infection and lost "chunks of muscle and flesh" from his upper arm.
"My notes say I had necrotising fasciitis secondary to a spider bite," he added.

A scar now runs from his wrist to his armpit.
"Everyone knocks the NHS," he said. "But they pulled out all the stops for me. They saved my life."

False widows are cited as Britain's most venomous spiders, but experts say the species is not usually aggressive towards humans and that bites are rare.
They're often mistaken for their more dangerous cousin, the black widow.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-beds-bucks-herts-40504978
 

EnolaGaia

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Restoring pigment to gray hair is a noteworthy side effect for the particular cancer drugs involved here. The strangest bit is that the effect seems to have been reversed for patients taking the same drug(s) for a different type of cancer.

NO DYE: CANCER PATIENTS' GRAY HAIR DARKENED ON IMMUNE DRUGS


Cancer patients' gray hair unexpectedly turned youthfully dark while taking novel drugs, and it has doctors scratching their heads.

Chemotherapy is notorious for making hair fall out, but the 14 patients involved were all being treated with new immunotherapy drugs that work differently and have different side effects. A Spanish study suggests that may include restoring hair pigment, at least in patients with lung cancer.

With the first patient, "we thought it could be an isolated case," said Dr. Noelia Rivera, a dermatologist at Autonomous University of Barcelona.

But she said the research team found the same thing when they asked other patients for photos from before treatment.

The 14 cases were among 52 lung cancer patients being followed to see whether they developed bad side effects from the drugs - Keytruda, Opdivo and Tecentriq.

While most patients did not have a color change, the 14 cases suggest it's not an isolated finding. In 13 patients, hair turned darkish brown or black. In one patient, it turned black in patches.

In another odd twist, the same drugs have been linked previously with hair losing color in patients with another cancer, melanoma.
FULL STORY: http://hosted.ap.org/dynamic/storie...ME&TEMPLATE=DEFAULT&CTIME=2017-07-21-11-40-46
 

EnolaGaia

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Yithian

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Not only did the casualty apparently have a sex change, so did the photographer! :p
Nobody had a sex change, it's just rubbish reporting.
There's no mystery and any slight factual haze is certainly not medical.
Posts removed as off topic.
 

Kingsize Wombat

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So somewhere in the Appalachian Mountains of Kentucky there is a place called "Troublesome Creek" where interbreeding created a family of blue skinned people... Sounds like a horror movie, but it's true!

The Blue Fugate Family of Troublesome Creek, Kentucky

For nearly 200 years, the Fugate family of Kentucky remained largely sealed off from the outside world as they passed their blue skin from generation to generation.

When Benjamin “Benjy” Stacy was born in 1975, nurses and doctors were shocked and confused.

Rather than coming out a bright shade of crimson like most babies, Benjy was born with dark blue skin. Doctors were so worried by this alien skin color that they called an ambulance to take Benjy the 116 miles from his hometown outside Hazard, Kentucky to the University of Kentucky Medical Center.
http://all-that-is-interesting.com/blue-fugate-family-kentucky
 

Quake42

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hunck

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A family of 14 who were all born with six fingers and six toes have welcomed another member to their clan - a baby boy with same genetic abnormality.

The extraordinary De Silva family, from Brasília, Brazil, have used the extra digit to their advantage and say the abnormality makes them "stand out from the crowd".

Seven-year-old Guilherme said: “The coolest thing about having six fingers being able to hold a lot of things at once.”

His cousin Maria added: “The best thing about having six fingers is I can play more keys [on the piano].

And goalkeeper Joao Assis said: “I’m able to reach some balls when people can’t. For me it’s easier to hold the ball, I have more grip and my hands covers more, so it’s difficult for the ball to escape."

Alessandro’s grandfather Assis is responsible for turning the family’s deficiency into something to be proud of.

Alessandro said: “My grandfather transformed having six fingers into a valuable thing. So much so that he wrote a book where his hands are on the cover.

"And he composed music and everything he did carried the six finger family symbol. He transformed the six fine thing into a family brand.”




 

Kingsize Wombat

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Imagine an illness that only afflicts children of asylum seekers...in Sweden. And it exists - or does it?

Resignation syndrome: Sweden's mystery illness

For nearly two decades Sweden has been battling a mysterious illness. Called Resignation Syndrome, it affects only the children of asylum-seekers, who withdraw completely, ceasing to walk or talk, or open their eyes. Eventually they recover. But why does this only seem to occur in Sweden?

When her father picks her up from her wheelchair, nine-year-old Sophie is lifeless. In contrast, her hair is thick and shiny - like a healthy child's. But Sophie's eyes are closed. And under her tracksuit bottoms she wears a nappy. A transparent feeding tube runs into Sophie's nose - this is how she has been nourished for the past 20 months.


http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-41748485

The same story is also available as a podcast, if you'd rather listen:
https://player.fm/series/bbc-news-front-page/11668-resignation-syndrome-swedens-mystery-illness
 
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