Medieval Serfs Richer Than Modern Poor

ramonmercado

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Medieval serfs richer than modern poor
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/bre ... ing32.html
Mon, Dec 06, 2010

People living in medieval England were more prosperous than modern day residents of the world’s poorest nations, a study into Britain’s economic history has found.

The research by economists at the University of Warwick found that per capita income in England during the Middle Ages was more than double that required for the “bare bones subsistence” experience of people living in many of today’s poorest countries.

The paper, entitled British Economic Growth 1270-1870 and published by the university’s Centre on Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy, estimates that per capita income in England in the late Middle Ages was around €755 ($1,000) when compared with currency values in 1990.

Professor Stephen Broadberry, who led the research, said that England’s income per head of population was even running at more than €604 ($800), using the same 1990 dollar measure, on the eve of the Black Death, which first struck in the late 1340s.

The figures, far higher than previous estimates of around €302 ($400) per year, also suggest that the Industrial Revolution was the culmination of a lengthy period of economic development, rather than occurring “out of the blue” after centuries without any sustained growth.

The economist said: “Our work sheds new light on England’s economic past, revealing that per capita incomes in medieval England were substantially higher than the ‘bare bones subsistence’ levels experienced by people living in poor countries in our modern world.

“The majority of the British population in medieval times could afford to consume what we call a ‘respectability basket’ of consumer goods that allowed for occasional luxuries.

“By the late Middle Ages, the English people were in a position to afford a varied diet including meat, dairy produce and ale, as well as the less highly processed grain products that comprised the bulk of the ‘bare bones subsistence’ diet.”

Prof Broadberry added that the researchers - who have studied manorial documents and tithes, as well as farming and probate records - now aimed to gain a better understanding of the distribution of income in medieval England.
 

ramonmercado

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But did they have bunions?

Fashion-conscious medieval men paid the price for their love of pointy-toed shoes with a sharp increase in bunions, archaeologists have said.

Shoe styles changed significantly in the 14th Century from functional, round-toed shapes to elongated ones. About 27% of 14th and 15th Century skeletons found in Cambridge digs had the minor but uncomfortable deformity. It was mostly found in the over 45s, suggesting youthful fashion choices caused problems in middle age.

Archaeologist Dr Jenna Dittmar said: "We think of bunions as being a modern problem, but this work shows it was actually one of the more common conditions to have affected medieval adults."

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-cambridgeshire-57427365
 

Cochise

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It's not really news. The later medieval period was fairly prosperous in Western Europe - the decline started in the 14th century with a secession of disasters including the Black Death - which itself for a while had the counter-intuitive effect of making the survivors better off. But it also undermined the social dependencies which generated wealth and (usually) kept people fed. And in fact over the succeeding hundred years or so brought the medieval period to an end.

It's a comparison of modern poor countries with medieval relatively wealthy countries.
 
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