Metal Detectoring

Floyd1

Justified & Ancient
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Just watched 5 minutes of the first program and had to turn it off and delete all subsequent recordings. Hopeless
I've said it before and I'll say it again- bring back 'Time-Team' (the repeats will do just fine) on a Sunday early evening in Winter, instead of 'come dine with me in the jungle on ice' or whatever utter crap they show these days.
 

Bad Bungle

Tutti but not Frutti.
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Wouldn’t that make the pencils horribly unbalanced, with a lead weight on the end? Was it a thing in Victorian schools? Sounds unlikely to me..
By chance (hmph) I emptied the scrap lead pocket of my Detecto-pants™ in preparation for a dig tomorrow and found another horse head in a mud ball. Slightly different and not as nice as the original, it does show how a standard HB pencil would fit without much kerfuffle. I cannot though find any reference to horse head pencil toppers in olden times.

Horse_1037.jpg Horse_1038.jpg
 

hunck

Antediluvian
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By chance (hmph) I emptied the scrap lead pocket of my Detecto-pants™ in preparation for a dig tomorrow and found another horse head in a mud ball. Slightly different and not as nice as the original, it does show how a standard HB pencil would fit without much kerfuffle. I cannot though find any reference to horse head pencil toppers in olden times.

View attachment 59258 View attachment 59259
There’s a lot of ‘em about. Still looks more likely sheared off a toy horse or summat to me. If it were for a pencil why wouldn’t it have a nice round hole?
 

EnolaGaia

I knew the job was dangerous when I took it ...
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My first guess is that the horse heads were broken off cast metal toys, figurines, or perhaps utilitarian items on which they were decorative additions (e.g., wall-mounted coat hooks). I don't think the head (alone) was the whole of the original object.
 

kesavaross

Abominable Snowman
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Could it be a badge or a button or part of a clasp of some kind?
 

ramonmercado

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Manx Museum Metal Detecoting Finds.

A exhibition highlighting items unearthed by metal detectorists on the Isle of Man has gone on display.

The collection at Douglas's Manx Museum features items from both modern and ancient times, including broaches, swords and a toy cannon. It includes items held by Manx National Heritage and others held by those who found them.

Curator of archaeology Allison Fox said it was a celebration of the variety of items found across the island. The display includes two Bronze Age swords that date back more than 3,000 years. Ms Fox said they had helped to give a "different idea" of life during the period as they had been "used in anger" and were not just for ritual purposes.

https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-isle-of-man-63014604
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell with yesterday's knickers
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There’s a lot of ‘em about. Still looks more likely sheared off a toy horse or summat to me. If it were for a pencil why wouldn’t it have a nice round hole?
Did Victorian children even have pencils? I seem to remember stuff about using chalk on slates? For the plebs, obviously, maybe the monied classes had proper pencils, but would there have been SO many about to be finding all these horse's heads?
 

hunck

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Did Victorian children even have pencils? I seem to remember stuff about using chalk on slates? For the plebs, obviously, maybe the monied classes had proper pencils, but would there have been SO many about to be finding all these horse's heads?

Of sorts.. You're right about slates.

Slates were used extensively in all schools. The hard slate material was generally set in a wooden frame, and writing was done with the aid of a slate pencil, also a piece of slate, which was sharpened to a point. The slate pencil made a mark of grayish silver on the slate, but could easily be erased with a cloth. Victorian children were expected to bring a sponge or rag to wipe it, but many just used their sleeves. The slate was used because paper was expensive, but it had several disadvantages. Obviously work done on a slate could not be retained. It could not even be taken home for homework or revision, since it would smudge so easily. In addition the slate, and more so, the slate pencil could break if dropped.

1664138661779.png
 
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Swifty

doesn't negotiate with terriers
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By chance (hmph) I emptied the scrap lead pocket of my Detecto-pants™ in preparation for a dig tomorrow and found another horse head in a mud ball. Slightly different and not as nice as the original, it does show how a standard HB pencil would fit without much kerfuffle. I cannot though find any reference to horse head pencil toppers in olden times.

View attachment 59258 View attachment 59259
Maybe they were bottle toppers wrapped around corks? .. that explanation wouldn't fit for modern sized wine bottles though .. they also seem to be too small to be walking stick toppers ...

https://www.google.co.uk/search?source=univ&tbm=isch&q=antique+horse+head+metal+detector&fir=D__zY1-Hc4rRkM%2Cq2gFUuGZX8MRYM%2C_%3BVssiaQO3IxJVBM%2CqhJ03r75iknrfM%2C_%3BqJaEkFBg25-m-M%2CqhJ03r75iknrfM%2C_%3Bvopblv7B-6LhfM%2CS2ESAoYo6P02tM%2C_%3BQbB4hMYHsxFNIM%2C4Z4rD22cmYI_jM%2C_%3BCGQqdVdtU1MnLM%2Cnv0RhcYwEXpZMM%2C_%3BLARg_2faCN8i_M%2C4Z4rD22cmYI_jM%2C_%3BN2XjkbAu8MCVGM%2Cbhoo0qTHhshlxM%2C_%3BOxylxjpCk0E22M%2CaX9GzXwWkjzAmM%2C_%3BsNS4xL8FTwj5HM%2C4Z4rD22cmYI_jM%2C_&usg=AI4_-kR6trOsRTmAn38IOZ9zWNT8cfqBfg&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwj7k63O87D6AhU1oVwKHauGB8UQjJkEegQIAxAC&biw=1463&bih=730&dpr=0.9
 

Fluttermoth

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My first guess is that the horse heads were broken off cast metal toys, figurines, or perhaps utilitarian items on which they were decorative additions (e.g., wall-mounted coat hooks). I don't think the head (alone) was the whole of the original object.

My first thought was a head from a mounted toy soldier; cheap, often hollow, metal toy soldiers were ubiquitous boy's toys for many years and, according to my dad, many ended up decapitated in battle and buried with full military honours :salute:
 

maximus otter

Recovering policeman
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By chance (hmph) I emptied the scrap lead pocket of my Detecto-pants™ in preparation for a dig tomorrow and found another horse head in a mud ball. Slightly different and not as nice as the original, it does show how a standard HB pencil would fit without much kerfuffle. I cannot though find any reference to horse head pencil toppers in olden times.

View attachment 59258 View attachment 59259

lt might be the head from a 54mm / 1:32 scale model horse. This is/was a popular scale for toy soldiers etc.

lf so, it’s just broken at a weak spot in the casting.

maximus otter
 

catseye

Old lady trouser-smell with yesterday's knickers
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lt might be the head from a 54mm / 1:32 scale model horse. This is/was a popular scale for toy soldiers etc.

lf so, it’s just broken at a weak spot in the casting.

maximus otter
Has anyone measured a casting mould to see if the hole fits? This does seem the most likely explanation to me. Lead is so soft that I can see boys 'turning' horses heads to give them a different stance and the head eventually breaking off.
 

Sid

Justified & Ancient
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lt might be the head from a 54mm / 1:32 scale model horse. This is/was a popular scale for toy soldiers etc.

lf so, it’s just broken at a weak spot in the casting.

maximus otter
I see there are many examples I found online of old lead horses which were the toys of the day - very like the examples found by @Bad Bungle, seems 99% very like that's what the broken heads are.
 

hunck

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Metal detectorist finds 600 year old gold coin on farm

Mick Edwards, 62, was spending his 35th wedding anniversary in Etchilhampton, Wiltshire, when he unearthed the Portuguese coin.

Thought to be the first of its kind ever found in the UK, the civil servant was gobsmacked when he saw the coin from the reign of Manuel the First, between 1495 and 1521.
Inscribed with the phrase ‘In this sign shall we conquer’ in Latin, the coin was expected to sell for £30,000 but sold for £16,000 at the Noonans auction in London yesterday.

The coin — which is 36 millimetres in diameter and weighs around 30 grams — was buried around 10 inches in the mud.

It’s made of gold looted from Africa by Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama.

Edwards, from Peterlee, County Durham, said he plans to split the cash with the Wiltshire pasture landowner.
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