Miracles & Canonisation

Zilch5

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I can't believe this is happening and it is making me feel ill.

This 2010 people, and as a lapsed Catholic who had this rubbish forced down his throat as a kid, I refuse to watch this.

Channel 7 is going bonkers with this - good, as I never watch it.
 

Anome

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I can understand the ABC doing a Compass special, since they already have a religious program, but the commercial networks don't show any religious programming beyond televangelists at 4am, and it seems a bit odd for them to suddenly show an interest.
 

poozler

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Aw, Zilch. Take heart! You know Australia is a very confused country when it comes to the cult of celebrity.

We hate Queen Elizabeth as a symbol of colonial oppression, but love "our" Princess Mary for ''marrying up'' and getting the hell out of Tasmania; we hate Americans because they are stupid, talentless hicks, but worship Hollywood stars and get all excited when "our" Rusty/Nicole/whomever wins an Academy Award or gets a part in an American picture, because it's proof that we are just as good as the Americans we hate. It stands to reason that we mock formal religion, while condemning the vile actions of the church while getting all het up about miracles performed by "our" St Mary.

One day we will figure it out.

It's probably wise not to watch ANY commercial television here until all the nonsense is truly past.
 

Anome

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I find that a good general rule. These days I hardly watch commercial television at all. And the thought of the commercial networks' doing commentary on the beatification of St Mary McKillop just boggles the mind.

Will Nine have Darryl Eastlake locked in a soundproof booth to do commentary?

Come to think of it, will the ABC get Chris Taylor on their coverage? (He might not be welcome at the Vatican after the "incident".)
 

escargot

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BBC R4'S 'Sunday' programme'

This weekend thousands of Australians are set to gather in Rome for the Canonisation of their first saint, Mary McKillop. Born in 1842, Mary became a Catholic Nun and Teacher and was at one point excommunicated. Willam Crawley talks to Father Brian Lucas from the Australian Catholic Bishops Conference about her life.
I heard this. McKillop's brief excommunication was put down by Lucas to jealousies relating to local clergy and the attitudes of Irish bishops, who were not used to women running missions. No mention of child abuse.
 

Anome

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From what I've heard, the paragraph quoted by Dougal is correct. The order reported the abuse, Mary herself isn't directly linked to the report, and her excommunication was unrelated.
 

DougalLongfoot

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Anome_ said:
Will Nine have Darryl Eastlake locked in a soundproof booth to do commentary?

Come to think of it, will the ABC get Chris Taylor on their coverage? (He might not be welcome at the Vatican after the "incident".)
Big Dazza has alzheimer's and is close to death, so no commentary from him. ABC had Scott Bevan, a member of the Brown Joeys, an academic from ACU and ABC's religion and ethics editor, Scott Stephens, so no sign of the Chaser.
 
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Anome_ said:
From what I've heard, the paragraph quoted by Dougal is correct. The order reported the abuse, Mary herself isn't directly linked to the report, and her excommunication was unrelated.
Reports differ on that.
 

Anome

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ramonmercado said:
Anome_ said:
From what I've heard, the paragraph quoted by Dougal is correct. The order reported the abuse, Mary herself isn't directly linked to the report, and her excommunication was unrelated.
Reports differ on that.
True. The reports that actually have documentary evidence to back them up go with what Dougal and I have said, and reports from people trying to push an agenda don't.
 
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Anome_ said:
ramonmercado said:
Anome_ said:
From what I've heard, the paragraph quoted by Dougal is correct. The order reported the abuse, Mary herself isn't directly linked to the report, and her excommunication was unrelated.
Reports differ on that.
True. The reports that actually have documentary evidence to back them up go with what Dougal and I have said, and reports from people trying to push an agenda don't.
Now the RCC would never push an agenda would they? See my posting on the Vatican Bank which (Iforetell) will appear shortly.
 
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Heres another report on the Nun.

Pope canonises nun who exposed paedophile priest
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/wor ... 41063.html
PADDY AGNEW in Rome

Mon, Oct 18, 2010

POPE BENEDICT XVI issued a powerful signal yesterday when he canonised an Australian nun whose order exposed a paedophile Irish priest back in 1871.

Mother Mary of the Cross MacKillop, the daughter of Scottish immigrants, was yesterday canonised in St Peter’s Square in Rome, thus making her the Catholic Church’s first Australian saint. A woman who spent her life in the service of the sick, the poor and the underprivileged, Mother Mary in 1867 founded the Sisters of St Joseph of the Sacred Heart. Three years later, her order found itself in the eye of a bitter polemic with the Australian church hierarchy when the Josephites exposed paedophile Irish priest Fr Patrick Keating.

When the Josephite order informed the vicar general of Fr Keating’s activities, the Irish priest was sent back to Ireland where he continued to serve as a clergyman. It is believed, however, that a colleague of Fr Keating, Galway man Fr Charles Horan, angered by the removal of Fr Keating, attempted to seek vengeance on the Josephites.

Appointed acting vicar general in 1870, Fr Horan persuaded the ailing Bishop of Adelaide, Laurence Shiel, to excommunicate Mother Mary and 47 other Josephite nuns for alleged “insubordination”. Five months later, on his deathbed, Bishop Shiel revoked that excommunication, thus allowing Mother Mary to return to her work with the poor, the needy and with the Aborigine people.

When Pope John Paul II beatified Mother Mary in 1995, the first step towards being made a saint, he said that she embodied all that is best in Australia and the Australian people. Pope Benedict took up the same theme yesterday, saying: “For many years, countless young people throughout Australia have been blessed with teachers who were inspired by the courageous and saintly example of zeal, perseverance and prayer of Mother Mary MacKillop.”

Among those who attended yesterday’s Vatican canonisation ceremony was 30-year-old Irishman David Keohane, whose family believe that Mother Mary intervened to save him after he had been severely injured in an assault in Coogee, Australia, in August 2008. Keohane, at the time living and working in Sydney, was found unconscious in a pool of blood on a footpath, having apparently been severely beaten.

Among those to visit Keohane as he lay in a coma in hospital in Australia were Josephite nuns, who also took Keohane family members to the tomb of Mother Mary to pray. Keohane awoke from his coma on St Patrick’s Day last year in a miracle recovery which his family attribute to Mother Mary’s intervention.

Thousands of Australians also celebrated Mother Mary’s canonisation yesterday, watching TV coverage of the Vatican ceremony both at home and on large outdoor screens in Sydney, in Melbourne and in Penola, where she established her first school. Also present in Rome yesterday was Australia’s foreign minister, Kevin Rudd.
 

Kondoru

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Wouldnt someone who killed rabbits, freed convicts and befriended aborigines be more appropriate?
 

Kondoru

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Yes.

Or whoever introduced the surfboard...that certainly improved the spiritual atmosphere of Oz.

Provided it is well documented as to who did it of course
 
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Kondoru said:
Yes.

Or whoever introduced the surfboard...that certainly improved the spiritual atmosphere of Oz.

Provided it is well documented as to who did it of course
T'was the first Irish convict who tried to escape on an old door.
 

Zilch5

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Not really, but Duke Kahanamoku - a Hawaiian bloke who introduced surfing to Australia in 1915.
 
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Lourdes tells of invalid's 'healing'
http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/wor ... 98903.html

PARIS – The Catholic shrine at Lourdes has announced the “remarkable healing” of a French invalid, avoiding the traditional term “miracle” because its doctors increasingly shy away from calling an illness incurable.

The case of Serge Francois (56), whose left leg was mostly paralysed for years, was the first healing announced since the church eased some rules in 2006 for declaring that a person was healed thanks to visiting the site.

The Catholic Church teaches that God sometimes performs miracles, including cures that doctors cannot explain. Sceptics reject this as unscientific.
 
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Declared a saint, the anti-Hitler activist beheaded by Nazis at age 25
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldne ... ge-25.html

One of the founders of an anti-Hitler movement in wartime Germany has been declared a saint by the Russian Orthodox Church 69 years after he was beheaded by the Nazis.

By Matthew Day, Warsaw2:55PM GMT 06 Feb 2012 16 Comments

The church canonised Alexander Schmorell for his involvement in the White Rose group, which vented its disgust of Hitler and the Nazi regime by writing pamphlets opposing the regime and condemning the treatment of Soviet citizens under German occupation.

The group also took to daubing walls in Munich, the birthplace of the Nazi party, with slogans such as "Down with Hitler" and "Freedom".
Schmorell, who had a Russian mother, had been baptised into the Orthodox Church and remained a committed Christian till he was sent to the guillotine in 1943 aged 25.

The Church also recognised that along with his rejection of Nazism, Schmorrel had little time for communism.
"For us he took a very important stance, rejecting both Bolshevism and National Socialism," said Archpriest Nikolai Artemoff, who had led the campaign to have Schmorrel canonised.

Alexa Busch, the new saint's niece, said: "His faith was surely one of the reasons he was so free and independent".

Schmorrel had become involved in the White Rose movement when he was a medical student in Munich. Disgusted at the immorality of Hitler's totalitarian state he wrote four pamphlets, calling for Germans to reject the "fascist criminals", which were then copied and distributed covertly by the small group of fellow students that comprised the group.

A stint as a combat medic on the Eastern Front exposed the idealistic student to the appalling treatment German forces meted out to Soviet civilians and POWs. On his return to Munich he and the White Roses printed a fifth pamphlet, telling people that the "day of reckoning" had arrived "for the most contemptible tyrant our people have ever endured".

The leaflets prompted the Gestapo to increase their efforts to capture the Whites Roses, and they were all arrested in 1943.

Schmorrel was found guilty of "political crimes" against the German state and executed
 
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Pope names 7 new saints
http://rt.com/news/line/2012-10-21/#id39301

Pope Benedict XVI added seven more saints to the roster of Catholic role models on Sunday. They are: Kateri Tekakwitha, the first Native American saint; Mother Marianne Cope, a 19th century Franciscan nun; Pedro Calungsod, a Filipino teenager who helped Jesuit priests convert natives in Guam in the 17th century; Jacques Berthieu, a 19th-century French Jesuit; Giovanni Battista Piamarta, an Italian who founded a religious order in 1900; Carmen Salles Y Barangueras, a Spanish nun who founded a religious order to educate children in 1892; and Anna Schaeffer, a 19th-century German lay woman. The canonization coincided with a Vatican meeting of the world's bishops on trying to revive Christianity in places where it has fallen by the wayside.
 
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800! Hes lost his head.

Pope canonises 800 Italian Ottoman victims of Otranto
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22499327

Pope Francis has proclaimed more saints than any of his predecessors

Pope Francis has proclaimed the first saints of his pontificate in a ceremony at the Vatican - a list which includes 800 victims of an atrocity carried out by Ottoman soldiers in 1480.

They were beheaded in the southern Italian town of Otranto after refusing to convert to Islam.

Their names are unknown, apart from one man, Antonio Primaldo.

Within two months of taking office, Pope Francis has proclaimed more saints than any of his predecessors.

Continue reading the main story
Otranto 14 August 1480
The `'Martyrs of Otranto" were 813 Italians beheaded for defying demands by Turkish invaders to renounce Christianity
The Turks had been sent by Mohammed II, who had already captured the "second Rome" of Constantinople
His fleet landed in Otranto, Italy's easternmost city, and laid siege
Its citizens held out for two weeks, allowing the King of Naples to muster his forces and prevent the fall of Rome
Among those canonised on Sunday were two Latin American nuns - Laura Montoya from Colombia and Maria Guadalupe Garcia Zavala from Mexico - who both died in the 20th Century.

Colombia's first saint, Mother Laura Montoya dedicated her life to helping indigenous people while the woman named by Pope Francis as Mother "Lupita" sheltered Catholics during a government crackdown against the faith in the 1920s.

The Italian "Martyrs of Otranto" were executed after 20,000 Turkish soldiers invaded their town in south-eastern Italy.

There was no hint of any anti-Islamic sentiment in the homily that Pope Francis delivered before tens of thousands of worshippers gathered in St Peter's Square, the BBC's David Willey in Rome reports.


Tapestries commemorating those being canonised were displayed at the Vatican
While it was Francis's predecessor, Pope Benedict, who gave the go ahead for their canonisations, the new pope is continuing the process of honouring a new generation of modern as well as historic martyrs, our correspondent says.

Later this month an Italian priest, Fr Giuseppe Puglisi, who was murdered by the Sicilian mafia 20 years ago will be beatified - the last step before being declared a saint
 
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Unusual for a good person to be beatified.

'Mafia martyr' Don Giuseppe Puglisi beatified in Sicily
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-22664822

Father Puglisi's was famous for a catch phrase: "And what if somebody did something"

More than 50,000 people have attended the beatification of Don Giuseppe Puglisi, a Roman Catholic priest murdered by the mafia in 1993.

The ceremony, in the Sicilian capital Palermo, marks the penultimate step on the path to being made a saint.

He was shot by a hitman in front of the church where he used to urge his congregation to disobey mafia bosses.

He will be the first victim of organised crime to be declared a martyr by the Catholic Church.

Six men are currently serving life sentences for the murder, which took place on his 56th birthday.

Forty bishops and a cardinal representing Pope Francis attended the ceremony, as well as government ministers from Rome.

Code of silence
Born in Palermo, Father Puglisi was the son of a shoemaker and seamstress, and was ordained at the age of 22.

He taught mathematics and religion in several schools, served as the chaplain in an institute for orphans, and went on to work in run-down areas of Palermo.

But he became a target as he grew increasingly outspoken in denouncing crime and alleging collusion between politicians and mafia figures.

Don Giuseppe Puglisi has been declared a martyr of the church, murdered "in hatred of the faith".

He was famous for a rhetorical question, which he used as a catch phrase in order to encourage Sicilians to stand up and fight organised crime: "And what if somebody did something?"

The BBC's David Willey in Rome says the Catholic Church has been accused in the past of an ambiguous relationship towards Cosa Nostra, the men who for decades have controlled organised crime on the Mediterranean island.

By beatifying Father Puglisi, the Church is making a strong stand against mafia crime - which has been protected by a code of silence - our correspondent says.

Earlier this month, Pope Francis proclaimed the first saints of his pontificate in a ceremony at the Vatican - a list which includes 800 victims of an atrocity carried out by Ottoman soldiers in 1480.

These meant that, within two months of taking office, he had proclaimed more saints than any previous Pope, although his predecessor Pope Benedict had given the go ahead for their canonisations.
 
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