Miracles & Canonisation

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G.K. Chesterton: Bishop of Northampton probes sainthood claims
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-no ... e-23769750

G.K. Chesterton lived in Beaconsfied, Buckinghamshire, which is part of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Northampton

The Bishop of Northampton is to appoint a priest to look at whether author G.K. Chesterton should be made a saint after a campaign was launched by the American Chesterton Society (ACS).

Mr Chesterton, who found fame through his Father Brown novels, converted to Roman Catholicism in the 1920s.

Dale Ahlquist, president of the ACS, said Mr Chesterton's writings had brought people to the Catholic faith.

He said Mr Chesterton, who died in 1936, is a "saint for our time".

Mr Chesterton lived in Beaconsfield, Buckinghamshire, which is part of the Northampton diocese.

'Pope's support'
Bishop Peter Doyle said he had spoken to the ACS and would appoint a priest to make "tentative inquiries".

This is the first official step towards the possible canonization of Mr Chesterton.

"I'm grateful for all of the work done by Chesterton devotees around the world that has prompted the bishop to make this very important decision," said Mr Ahlquist.

"One of the reasons that especially motivated him is the fact that His Holiness, Pope Francis, expressed support for Chesterton's Cause when he was the Archbishop of Buenos Aires.

"I think he is very much a saint for our time and could draw many people into the Catholic Church."

Mr Chesterton's novels include The Napoleon of Notting Hill and The Man Who Would Be Thursday.

He also wrote the religious works Orthodoxy, The Everlasting Man and books on St Francis of Assisi and St Thomas Aquinas.

The Orthodoxy looked at the meaning of life and Chesterton's spiritual journey to Christianity

The Everlasting Man is a spiritual history of western civilization which has been credited with helping to convert the author CS Lewis from atheism to Christianity.
 
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I'll be following this story with some interest. Recently, I visited some Catholic churches here in the Netherlands (both Roman and 'Old'). More than once, I saw small posters promoting a talk, or discussion, on the faith and works of Chesterton.

I wonder if there will be evidence of miracles connected with Chesterton put forward?

I only really know of his work from the Father Brown stories and the v.Fortean, The Man Who Was Thursday. The Father Brown stories are excellent detective fiction and do give an interesting insight into Catholic morality. It's about time I read The Man Who Was Thursday, again.

Just as long as they don't try to canonize Evelyn Waugh.
 
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Why not have a bacon curing plant at Lourdes?

Diagnosing miracles

7,000 people claim to have been cured at Lourdes, but the Catholic Church says only 1 per cent of those cases are miracles. Dr Michael Moran sits on the committee that decides which cures are medically unexplainable

Dr Michael Moran is a Belfast hospital registrar who is prepared to take a bit of surgical ribbing. He is studying to be an ear, nose and throat surgeon specialising in neck and head cancers. But occasionally during operations some of his colleagues query why he even bothers to scrub up.

“ ‘Sure you don’t need to operate on that patient,’ some of them have said to me. ‘Just stand beside them and they will be miraculously cured.’ ”
Moran doesn’t mind these rather lame gags; it’s part of operating-theatre banter. But, equally, he’d prefer not to be known as a miracle doctor. He is the first Irishman to be appointed to an international committee that evaluates cures at Lourdes. “It is not a miracle-determining committee. It is a cure-determining committee,” he stresses.

Moran says his function is not to determine whether a particular cure is down to a miracle at the grotto where 14-year-old Bernadette Soubirous said the Virgin Mary appeared to her in 1858. That’s for the Catholic Church to adjudicate on.

“All we comment on is the fact that the person has had an inexplicable cure,” says the 34-year-old, who is from Finaghy, in south Belfast, and qualified in 2004 as a doctor from Queen’s University Belfast.

Moran has been going to Lourdes each year since he was 16, travelling on the annual July Down and Connor diocesan pilgrimage. He is a founder member of Seirbhís, an all-Ireland group of health professionals who volunteer to help at Lourdes.

Two years ago he was “surprised and honoured” to be appointed to the International Medical Committee of Lourdes (Le Comité Médical International de Lourdes). He is one of 34 international members who have expertise in different medical areas and who help decide if cures are truly inexplicable.

Since 1858 about 200 million people have visited Lourdes, at the foot of the Pyrenees in France, and the town attracts about six million pilgrims a year. About 7,000 have claimed to have been cured at Lourdes, but only 69 have been recognised by the Catholic Church as miracles, the most recent last year. ...

http://www.irishtimes.com/life-and-styl ... -1.1912024
 
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I'm a bit unsure where to post this but hes a Saint and maybe its a Miracle.

'Ghost' of Irish martyr Saint Oliver Plunkett captured on video?

Saint Oliver Plunkett, the Archbishop of Armagh and Catholic Primate of All Ireland, was the last Catholic to be martyred in England. He was executed in 1681 as part of the Popish Plot, beatified in 1920 and canonised in 1975.

He became the patron saint of Peace and Reconciliation in 1997.

Four years ago a British author captured a ghostly apparition of Saint Oliver Plunkett on video while visiting Ireland.

Vikki Bramshaw said she only discovered the image of "the ghost" of St. Oliver Plunkett peering out of the prison door in Saint Peter’s Church in Drogheda, County Louth when she viewed the video taken with her cell phone camera later on.

Catch a glimpse of the face, which appears briefly a few times at the hatch of the 15th century cell door.

"I don't really believe in ghosts or anything like that, so I was a bit spooked out to see it when I was checking my video when I got home," Bramshaw told a local Irish newspaper.

"I visited Drogheda between March 10-17, and was taken around Newgrange and other tourist sites, and Saint Peter’s was just one of our stops," she said.

"I was just filming the cell door with my camera phone, and didn't notice anything unusual at the time, but when I checked it that night, I was definitely a bit spooked by what I saw."

The video shows what appears to be a face that appears at the small hatch in the door a number of times.

"I watched it again and again to see if it was a reflection, but there are other things reflected in the glass, and they're not moving, and this does," said Bramshaw, who lives in Southampton. ...
http://www.irishcentral.com/news/ghost- ... 2191.html#
 
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Pope Francis will bestow sainthood on two Palestinian nuns on Sunday (May 17), a move that’s being seen as giving hope to the conflict-wracked Middle East and shining the spotlight on the plight of Christians in the region.

Sisters Maria Baouardy and Mary Alphonsine Danil Ghattas are due to be canonized by the pontiff along with two other 19th-century nuns, Sister Jeanne Emilie de Villeneuve, from France, and Italian Sister Maria Cristina dell’Immacolata.

The coming canonizations have been described by the Latin patriarch of Jerusalem, Fouad Twal, as a “sign of hope” for the region.

“The canonization of these two Palestinian saints is a spiritual highpoint for the inhabitants of the Holy Land,” he told Vatican Insider.

“The fact that Mariam (Maria) and Marie (Mary) Alphonsine, the first modern Palestinian saints, are both Arabs is a sign of hope for Palestine, for the entire Holy Land and the Middle East: holiness is always possible, even in a war-torn region. May a generation of saints follow them!” ...

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/...ns_n_7260252.html?ncid=tweetlnkushpmg00000067
 
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Next week in Washington, Pope Francis will preside over one of the most controversial acts of his papacy. He will confer sainthood on the 18th century Spanish missionary Friar Junipero Serra, and in doing so, dive into a cultural battle in the United States.

Serra founded nine of the 21 missions in California that later were the basis of what is now the modern state. He is a household name in California, where streets and buildings bear his name and children study his legacy in schools.

Critics say that legacy has more darkness than light, that his halo is stained with blood.

Many Native Americans were appalled when the pope announced the canonisation in January, calling Serra a great evangelizer. The late Pope John Paul beatified Serra in 1988 and Francis waived Church rules that normally require a second miracle between beatification and sainthood.

Detractors say Serra, who arrived from Mexico in what is now San Diego in 1769, beat and imprisoned Native Americans in the closed communities known as missions. They say he suppressed their cultures and facilitated the spread of diseases that heavily reduced the population.

http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/when-pope-canonizes-serra-a-halo-stained-with-blood/ar-AAeshXg
 
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Vatican City, Jun 21, 2016 / 03:03 am (CNA/EWTN News).- Pope Francis has announced the canonization date of Blessed Elizabeth of the Trinity, a Carmelite nun of the 20th century who will be formally recognzied as a saint October 16.

In March, the Pope had acknowledged a miracle worked through the intercession of Blessed Elizabeth, paving the way for her canonization. ...

She entered the Carmel in Dijon in 1901, and died there in 1906 – at the age of 26 – from Addison's disease.

Elizabeth wrote several works while there, the best-known of which is her prayer “O My God, Trinity Whom I Adore.” Also particularly notable are her “Heaven in Faith,” a retreat she wrote three months before her death for her sister Guite; and the “Last Retreat,” her spiritual insights from the last annual retreat she was able to make.

Cardinal Albert Decourtray, who was Bishop of Dijon from 1974 to 1981, was cured of cancer through Bl. Elizabeth's intercession – a miracle that allowed her beatification in 1984.

The healing acknowledged by Pope Francis March 4 was that of Marie-Paul Stevens, a Belgian woman who had Sjögren's syndrome, a glandular disease. ...

http://www.catholicnewsagency.com/n...e-trinity-the-story-behind-a-new-saint-86118/
 
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Pope Francis has canonised a "gaucho priest" from his homeland Argentina, making him the country's first saint.

Jose Gabriel del Rosario Brochero, often pictured in colourful poncho, travelled by mule to minister the poor in remote areas.

He was among seven saints declared in a Mass in St Peter's Square in Rome, which was attended by thousands.

He is credited with at least two posthumous miracles, the minimum requirement for sainthood.

Brochero, one of Argentina's most famous Catholics during Pope Francis' youth, suffered leprosy that left him blind until his death in 1914.

He was moved closer to sainthood with his beatification in 2013. At the time, Pope Francis wrote a letter to Argentina's bishops praising Brochero for having had the "smell of his sheep".

"He never stayed in the parish office. He got on his mule and went out to find people like a priest of the street, to the point of getting leprosy," Pope Francis wrote.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-37672188?ocid=socialflow_twitter
 
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At last! Someone who deserves to be canonised.

Archbishop Óscar Romero, who was killed in 1980 while he was celebrating Mass in El Salvador, will be declared a saint, Pope Francis has announced. Óscar Romero is revered in his native El Salvador for denouncing repression. Archbishop Romero was beatified in May 2015 in a ceremony in El Salvador which drew huge crowds.

The archbishop spoke out against the repression many of his compatriots suffered at the start of El Salvador's civil war, which lasted from 1980 to 1992. When the US-backed Salvadorean army was using death squads and torture to stop leftist revolutionaries from seizing power, he used what would become his last homily to speak out against it.

"The law of God which says thou shalt not kill must come before any human order to kill. It is high time you recovered your conscience," he said, calling on the National Guard and police to stop the violence.

"I implore you, I beg you, I order you in the name of God: Stop the repression."

One day later, on 24 March 1980, Archbishop Romero was shot dead by a sniper as he celebrated Mass in a hospital chapel.

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-43317438#
 

Tribble

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Cardinal John Henry Newman is closer to being canonised after a second miracle in his name was confirmed by the Pope.

Two authenticated miracles are required before sainthood and Newman, who was already attributed with curing a man's spinal disease, is now said to have healed a woman's unstoppable bleeding.


https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-birmingham-47228423
 
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AnonyJoolz

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I had personal experience of spontaneous, unexpected healing of a medical issue whilst knowing that others were praying for me in the early 2000's. I can't know if it was a 'miracle' as such, but when I told my friend (and CofE vicar) his response was "Good Lord!" and I replied "maybe it was!".

I am mindful that correlation does not equal causation. The time period was 3 weeks from being told I'd need a procedure to being told that it was now unnecessary.

I was booked in for a laser eye surgery called 'panretinal photocoagulation' to treat bilateral central retinal vein occlusions with the expectation that this would permanently reduce my peripheral vision as a side-effect, something that I wasn't looking forward to. My NHS consultant did the usual visual checks with the dilating eyedrops and big optical gizmo then she told me "they're gone!". I didn't need the surgery.

I havetried to keep an open mind about it. Maybe it was a case of spontaneous remission, or of a religious miracle, or of something else I can't name but whatever it was, I'm thankful for it.
 

Ermintruder

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@AnonyJoolz that was fantastic news!

But (and with the greatest of respects)- I wonder exactly what happened? We will never know.

And if you're unfamiliar of Tim Minchin's "Sam's Mum"....you MUST watch this this right through. And that goes for everybody!
 
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