Money From Out Of The Blue

rynner2

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Ah yes, those pound notes could buy a lot more than round pounds nowadays! Back in the 60s you could get 8 pints of best bitter for a pound note!
 

Crazystuffhappenstome

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Crazystuffhappens to me your story reminds me of when I was little. We were quite poor and while I was walking home from primary school, probably about grade 2 ,two one pound notes blew along the ground to my feet.
They were worth quite a bit of money in those days and it was a wonderful find.
Remember those pound notes (I'm sure I have one somewhere) I remember in the 70s find one that was extremely wet, I went to the local corner shop wet pound note in hand and bought enough chocolate to make me sick!!!! It was horrible growing up in a poor family (although I wouldn't change it for the world, you can not buy life experience) and I guess it makes me appreciate everything I have now, I have sort of made up for the stuff I never had as a kid and now have probably too much I also try to make sure that my son has everything he wants/needs but he isn't spoilt and I have (hopefully) taught him humility and compassion. I hope that life has treated you well and that you appreciate everything we now have.... Enjoy peace jj
 

Iris

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Crazystuffhappenstome I am much the same but I now find I have greater joy if I can help others who might need a bit of help.
I've noticed too that people who have material things as their main priority often don't have much joy in other aspects of their life.
I do enjoy my little bits and pieces - mostly bought from markets and op shops but if they were suddenly removed I wouldn't be all that worried, but family are all to me.
 

Crazystuffhappenstome

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Crazystuffhappenstome I am much the same but I now find I have greater joy if I can help others who might need a bit of help.
I've noticed too that people who have material things as their main priority often don't have much joy in other aspects of their life.
I do enjoy my little bits and pieces - mostly bought from markets and op shops but if they were suddenly removed I wouldn't be all that worried, but family are all to me.
Iris I know exactly what you mean although we were poor we had something that no amount of money could buy morals manners and a very strong sense of family and friends. We also learnt that material things are not the most important things and memories, love, happiness and peace are.i would also rather give than take and believe that as human beings we have a moral obligation to help each other as and when possible
 

Swifty

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Iris I know exactly what you mean although we were poor we had something that no amount of money could buy morals manners and a very strong sense of family and friends. We also learnt that material things are not the most important things and memories, love, happiness and peace are.i would also rather give than take and believe that as human beings we have a moral obligation to help each other as and when possible
Can you lend me a tenner till Monday Crazystuffhappenstome ? .. I'm good for it :)
 

rynner2

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Necklace kept in Truro woman's knicker drawer fetches £36k at auction
By RWhitehouse | Posted: April 16, 2016

A NECKLACE which had been stored in a Truro woman's underwear drawer has fetched £36,000 at auction.
The owner of the necklace, who does not want to be identified, was "astonished" when she was told that the heirloom she had kept among her knickers for decades was a rare piece of 19th century jewellery.
Last week it was sold for £36,000 at auction in London and the owner had no idea what it was worth when she showed it to jewellery expert Laura Smith at auctioneers Dix Noonan Webb.

"I was amazed when it fetched so much money," said the woman who had inherited the necklace, which belonged to a cousin of her grandmother, on her 21st birthday.
She added: "I had absolutely no idea that it was as valuable as that. My husband listened to the auction at Dix Noonan Webb online and it was very exciting."

After inheriting the necklace, the woman found, like many jewellery owners, that she very rarely wore it because she did not attend glamorous functions that justified such a special piece. Instead it spent several decades hidden away wrapped in knickers in her underwear drawer. Curious to discover more about it, she took the necklace and some of her late mother's jewellery to Laura Smith.
"I did not intend to sell it and Laura certainly did not pressure me to do so," she said. "I just thought that I would like to find out more about it."

Laura immediately realised that she was looking at something very rare. Known as a harlequin riviere necklace, the piece had been made by the leading Regent Street jewellers Rowlands & Frazer in the 1860s or 1870s. It is in a beautiful gilt tooled brown leather fitted case with a silk interior bearing the maker's name.

The necklace is accompanied by a contemporary handwritten note from the jeweller identifying the different gemstones used to make it. These include rarities such as green demantoid garnets and pink spinels as well as golden topaz, aquamarine, and purple and blue sapphires.

etc...

http://www.westbriton.co.uk/Necklac...icker-drawer/story-29116282-detail/story.html

In the 1980s, I paid less then £36K for an end-of-terrace house!
 
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rynner2

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'Car boot-sale' diamond set to fetch £350,000 at auction

A diamond ring bought for £10 at a car-boot sale 30 years ago is expected to fetch £350,000 at auction.
The owner believed the "exceptionally sized" stone was a piece of costume jewellery when she bought it at West Middlesex Hospital in Isleworth, west London, in the 1980s.
Unaware it was a 26 carat, cushion-shaped white diamond from the 19th Century, she wore it daily for decades.

The stone goes under the hammer at Sotheby's in July.
The head of the auction house's London jewellery department, Jessica Wyndham, said: "The owner would wear it out shopping, wear it day-to-day. It's a good looking ring.
"But it was bought as a costume jewel. No-one had any idea it had any intrinsic value at all. They enjoyed it all this time.
"They'd been to quite a few car-boot sales over the years. But they don't have any history of collecting antiques and they don't have any history of collecting diamonds. This is a one-off windfall, an amazing find."

Ms Wyndham said the owner - who does not want to be identified - assumed it was not a genuine gemstone because it was in a "filthy" mount and it did not have the sparkle of a diamond.
She added that because the older style of diamond cutting was "slightly duller and deeper" than nowadays "it could trick people into thinking it's not a genuine stone".

"With an old style of cutting, an antique cushion shape, the light doesn't reflect back as much as it would from a modern stone cutting. Cutters worked more with the natural shape of the crystal, to conserve as much weight rather than make it as brilliant as possible."

After about 30 years of wearing the ring, the owners took it to Sotheby's when a jeweller told them it may be valuable.
"They came in with the idea that it might be real and they had no idea of its value," Ms Wyndham said.
"We had a look and... got it tested at the Gemological Institute of America."

She added: "The majority of us can't even begin to dream of owning a diamond that large."

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-39995908

On a personal note, I think I was born in that Isleworth hospital, a few decades before that diamond was found!
 

rynner2

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rynner2

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Car boot sale diamond fetches £650k at auction

A diamond ring bought at a car boot sale for £10 has been sold for £656,750 at auction in London.
The jewel was expected to fetch £350,000, but went for almost double that at Sotheby's on Wednesday.

The owner believed the "exceptionally-sized" stone was a piece of costume jewellery when she bought it at West Middlesex Hospital in Isleworth, west London, in the 1980s.
Unaware it was a 26 carat diamond, she wore it daily for decades.

The cushion-shaped white diamond is thought to have been from the 19th Century.
Ahead of the sale, the head of the auction house's London jewellery department, Jessica Wyndham, said: "The owner would wear it out shopping, wear it day-to-day. It's a good looking ring.
"No-one had any idea it had any intrinsic value at all. They enjoyed it all this time."

Ms Wyndham said the owner - who does not want to be identified - assumed it was not a genuine gemstone because it was in a "filthy" mount and it did not have the sparkle of a diamond.

It wasn't until after 30 years of wearing the ring that the owners took it to Sotheby's and a jeweller told them it may be valuable.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-london-40196565

Not a bad return for £10 invested! :D
 

Carse

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I posted on the Minor Strangeness thread earlier this year (or was it last year?) about a couple of strange occurrences in my bathroom involving the door appearing to be being held shut by someone or something inside, and the toilet roll being turned round on the holder despite me living alone. Now just a couple of minutes ago I was at the top of the stairs about to go down to the kitchen when I heard a coin hit the wooden floor in the bathroom and spin to a halt, if you know what I mean. I opened the door straight away and found that right in the middle of the floor was a rather dull ordinary looking one pence. It wasn't there last time I was in and I'm absolutely certain I heard a coin drop on the floor. Closer examination shows it is dated 1999.

This prompted me to remember the odd things that I'd posted about previously and I decided to post about this one on the Minor Strangeness thread as well but when I loaded the forum I found this thread, Money From Out of The Blue, directly below minor strangeness... So it looks like the cosmic joker decided to spend a penny in my bathroom and indulge in a wee bit of synchronicity at the same time!
 

GNC

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An apport! The fact you didn't uncover an intruder in the bathroom sounds like an authentic supernatural presence.
 

Lb8535

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I posted on the Minor Strangeness thread earlier this year (or was it last year?) about a couple of strange occurrences in my bathroom involving the door appearing to be being held shut by someone or something inside, and the toilet roll being turned round on the holder despite me living alone. Now just a couple of minutes ago I was at the top of the stairs about to go down to the kitchen when I heard a coin hit the wooden floor in the bathroom and spin to a halt, if you know what I mean. I opened the door straight away and found that right in the middle of the floor was a rather dull ordinary looking one pence. It wasn't there last time I was in and I'm absolutely certain I heard a coin drop on the floor. Closer examination shows it is dated 1999.

This prompted me to remember the odd things that I'd posted about previously and I decided to post about this one on the Minor Strangeness thread as well but when I loaded the forum I found this thread, Money From Out of The Blue, directly below minor strangeness... So it looks like the cosmic joker decided to spend a penny in my bathroom and indulge in a wee bit of synchronicity at the same time!
Can you tell us anything unusual about your house? (ie, dates to 1300, stories bout headless monks, former owners sold after a year, etc)
 

Carse

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Well it's a former school dating from the 1820s which was heavily converted 20 years ago into two houses, it overlooks the village graveyard (which hasn't had any new residents for at least a decade). I've lived here five years now and not had any odd incidents other than the three I've posted on here. I've uploaded the view from my bedroom window taken just now.
 

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smokehead

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Never had any luck with money my lot.
After mum died, in what seems like utter callousness the insurance company still collected the premiums while she was in intensive care but refused to pay out on the basis they hadn't issued a policy. I went with my dad to sort it out but got nowhere. He should have gone to a solicitor but he didn't.
Her mum died not long after, probably related, mums side of the family then sold the house and split it between them, didn't include my dad obviously.
As luck would have it, I sold a reel I had given him, which he then gave me back, just before Christmas. I put the money in a card and went off to see him on Christmas eve.
He apologised for not getting my daughter a present, money was really tight.
Whilst he was in the kitchen making me a cuppa I told my brother who was still living there about the money in the card.
He told me later on that when dad opened it he started crying.
 

smokehead

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Then again a couple of years later he won about three grand on the lottery.
In the 80's I was the only one working and often bought fishing gear I passed on to him and my younger brother.
Christmas again, and whilst I had no greedy anticipation I was somewhat surprised by what he gave me for a present- nothing.
 

Mythopoeika

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Then again a couple of years later he won about three grand on the lottery.
In the 80's I was the only one working and often bought fishing gear I passed on to him and my younger brother.
Christmas again, and whilst I had no greedy anticipation I was somewhat surprised by what he gave me for a present- nothing.
It's the thought that counts! :p
 

smokehead

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I heard some gossip that my younger brother and his wife soon had it off him.
Who knows? perhaps I was particularly obnoxious at that time.
The money situation did get easier for him thankfully, he collected fishing gear indiscriminately from second hand shops and car boots.
At the time of his passing he had amassed quite a collection. That disappeared very quickly, somewhat raw with me as whilst I am conscious of a certain superficiality I thought some consideration should have been given to the fact that I had bought him a lot of it in the early days.
As has been said, you don't really know anyone until the prospect of money is offered.
 
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As has been said, you don't really know anyone until the prospect of money is offered.
Quite so. I've a few relatives who convinced themselves (I assume) they 'deserved the money' and either kept it or withheld it until I 'got involved'. They're all still acting like I was the bad guy, which you expect, they have to defend their self-image, but it leaves a sour taste.

If it was millions I could maybe understand the motivation, but we're not talking about life changing sums of money or anything. In the end, a good proportion of folk do whatever they can get away with and justify it post hoc with some bullshit or other.
 

Lb8535

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Quite so. I've a few relatives who convinced themselves (I assume) they 'deserved the money' and either kept it or withheld it until I 'got involved'. They're all still acting like I was the bad guy, which you expect, they have to defend their self-image, but it leaves a sour taste.

If it was millions I could maybe understand the motivation, but we're not talking about life changing sums of money or anything. In the end, a good proportion of folk do whatever they can get away with and justify it post hoc with some bullshit or other.
Yes, as I get older I notice that Dickens was dead right about wills and families, and your sentence just about sums it up.
 

Ghost In The Machine

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Forgotten this but a few months back we were flat broke, one weekend. Nothing unusual there. Decided to walk the dog in the next village as our village is too boring. It was a Sunday morning, and no-one about. Not even a church service as the vicar has several parishes and it must have been the turn of one of the others, that week.

Just coming to the end of our circuit with the mutt, and almost back to the car, when we saw a tenner on the floor. Couldn't have come at a better moment.

Totally not paranormal in any way but very, very lucky. Children - today, we eat!
 

Swifty

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I found a silver coin in Tesco's carpark yesterday.

It is a Bangladeshi 2 Taka coin from 2010.

It is worth £0.019106

Nearly 2p! :glee:
RESULT ! :cool:

I love finding coins but I've never found one that cool .. and on the rare occasions that I've found notes of course I'm well happy but the experiences is always slightly sullied for me because I feel a bit bad for the person who's dropped it. Maybe it was their last note ? .. it doesn't stop me keeping it though.

I watched a tourist drop a tenner once, he was walking down the slope to the pier so I picked it up and said "Excuse me, you've dropped this" ... he just shrugged and took it back from me and continued to strut on with his girlfriend ... no smile, no roll of eyes and a tut, no thank you .... wanker ... that still pisses me off to this day.

Pennies are my favourite coins to find, they're normally dull in colour and most people can't be bothered to stoop to pick them up .. I've only found a couple of pound coins on the floor, they're so shiny that everyone probably spots them before me.

Every few months, you'll catch me marching up the road with a skull shaped transparent plastic beer jug full of coins to a nearby shop to either get it changed up or to buy something .. most of the coins appear just after the kids walk to school. I think they throw them on the ground because they get too much pocket money or they're trying to look flash or something.
 

plastic wiganer

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a friend of mine, if he finds any money, always takes it home and puts it in a jar. when the jar is full he donates the contents to whatever charity or organisation he sees fit. only a couple of weeks ago his latest donation was to the blood bikes. a nice gesture i think :clap:
 

stu neville

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We have a big plastic ice cream tub in the kitchen, sealed with gaffer tape and a slot cut in the top. Every day, we each put any small change we have into it (anything up to and including 10p pieces.) When full, I take it to the coinstar machine. Last time there was nearly £70 in it! We've been doing this for years now - it is however taking progressively longer to become full as we're using touch pay more and more.
..In the end, a good proportion of folk do whatever they can get away with and justify it post hoc with some bullshit or other.
Yeah, there's a couple of members of my extended family who fell out in a big way over a will - one of them had been there throughout for their aunt (who had no children of her own), dropped in to see her almost daily, did shopping for her, etc, whereas their sibling rarely if ever even phoned her. In the will the former got 66% of her estate plus all of her jewellery, the latter 20% and the rest to Cancer Research. The other sibling actually tried to sue the first one to equalise their share - she was convinced she was just entitled by right. She failed, and as far as I know they don't speak to this day (they're quite distant from me so I rarely if ever see either.) Very sad - they'd been close as kids.
 

Swifty

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We have a big plastic ice cream tub in the kitchen, sealed with gaffer tape and a slot cut in the top. Every day, we each put any small change we have into it (anything up to and including 10p pieces.) When full, I take it to the coinstar machine. Last time there was nearly £70 in it! We've been doing this for years now - it is however taking progressively longer to become full as we're using touch pay more and more.

Yeah, there's a couple of members of my extended family who fell out in a big way over a will - one of them had been there throughout for their aunt (who had no children of her own), dropped in to see her almost daily, did shopping for her, etc, whereas their sibling rarely if ever even phoned her. In the will the former got 66% of her estate plus all of her jewellery, the latter 20% and the rest to Cancer Research. The other sibling actually tried to sue the first one to equalise their share - she was convinced she was just entitled by right. She failed, and as far as I know they don't speak to this day (they're quite distant from me so I rarely if ever see either.) Very sad - they'd been close as kids.
When I lost my granddad Norman (my mum's dad) I was more upset than worrying about getting any inheritance but I wound up with £7000 ... it turns out that back when my parents were wealthy, my mum asked her dad not to leave any money to our side of the family because her brother (my uncle Ron + his wife and son) weren't as well off at the time ...

Times change, Ron's secure now as are my parents although none of us are wealthy .... all the money was left to Ron so my mum went cap in hand and Ron was cool enough to agree .. my dad set him up in business so I think Ron showed some heart and integrity, he could have easily contested it for money's sake but he didn't .. I've no idea how much money he gave to the rest of our family and it's none of my business ... I used the cash to buy a good mountain bike for work and an excellent digital film camera which I still make earners off .. I squandered the rest of the cash or helped other friends out, they've all paid me back to date.
 

escargot

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At work I often pick up loose change from the floor. Some of my colleagues swear they can collect £10 a month this way! I carry one of those magnets on a little telescopic pole gadgets, looks like a pen, which is good for some.
 
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