Mormons

ramonmercado

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Anome_ said:
Be fair, Mitt's first name is actually Willard. Which isn't an especially odd name. But he chooses to be called by his middle name.
Willard? Rats!
 

OneWingedBird

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Ran into a nice Mormon lady in the municipal swimming pool this morning, was mentioning how young Mormon 'elders' are, and she told me she'd known an Elder Berry, Elder Young and Elder Elder. :lol:
 

ramonmercado

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Mormons must have instructions on who to approach in the street. I've never been approached when in a suit (but they passed me) but have been stopped when wearing denim jacket etc.
 

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ramonmercado said:
Mormons must have instructions on who to approach in the street. I've never been approached when in a suit (but they passed me) but have been stopped when wearing denim jacket etc.
Suit = at work, no time to talk, no nonsense.
Denim jacket = not at work, casual personality, easy to bullshit.
 

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Dutch royals posthumously baptised by Mormons

National daily Trouw reports that several members of the Dutch royal family were baptised by the Mormon Church after their deaths.

The paper writes that the late Queen Juliana, her husband Prince Bernhard and Queen Beatrix’ late husband Prince Clause were baptised posthumously. Trouw’s report is based on secret data obtained from the Mormon Church’s global genealogical data base.

Under the laws of the Mormon Church members can only have their ancestors baptised posthumously, but many Mormons ignore these rules and have others baptised as well. Anne Frank’s Mormon baptism sparked fierce protests from the Jewish world.

Trouw writes that Prince Claus was baptised in 2004 – two years after his death – in the Brazilian city of Campinas. A spokesperson for the

Mormon Church in the Netherlands says the baptism was performed by “overzealous members.”

The paper does not say when and where Queen Juliana and Prince Bernhard were baptised. Trouw says that King Willem I, King Willem III, Queen Emma and Queen Wilhelmina were also baptised by Mormons.

The government information service has not reacted to the Mormon baptisms of members of the royal family.

The Mormon Church has found itself in the spotlights because US presidential hopeful Mitt Romney is a Mormon.

© Radio Netherlands Worldwide
From http://www.expatica.com/nl/news/dutch-n ... 26206.html

On a Dutch news site, I saw that the Mormon church has now issued official apologies for the baptisms, but I haven't found an English-language version of that report yet.
 

rynner2

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Here's a beaut of a cross-threader! So I toss a coin, and it goes... here!

Damian Thompson
Damian Thompson is Editor of Telegraph Blogs and a columnist for the Daily Telegraph. He was once described by The Church Times as a "blood-crazed ferret". :D
Where Mormonism meets Scientology
By Damian Thompson
US politics Last updated: July 6th, 2012
From Saturday's Daily Telegraph

We can take it for granted that Tom Cruise – whose divorce proceedings are already such a catastrophe for Scientology – will never talk in public about Xenu. The existence of this intergalactic emperor, who flourished c 75,000,000 BC, was top secret until the Church’s enemies took to the internet. Advice to journalists: if you ask Cruise about Xenu, the doors of Hollywood (where the Church wields immense influence) will slam in your face.

On the other hand, it’s safe to ask any Scientologist about Kolob. This is the star, or possibly planet, that is closest to the throne of God. Astronomers haven’t found it – yet – but it served as the inspiration for the planet Kobol in Battlestar Galactica.

Why is it safe to ask Cruise about Kolob? Because it’s Mormon, not Scientologist: it appears in The Book of Abraham, “translated” from Egyptian papyri by Joseph Smith, the founder of Mormonism. I use inverted commas because Smith couldn’t read Egyptian. The papyri were funerary texts.

The person you mustn’t ask about Kolob is Mitt Romney. The teaching isn’t a secret, but Latter-day Saints aren’t keen to discuss it. These days they stress their similarity with Christianity, and there’s no Kolob in the Gospels.

Admittedly, from a secular point of view, eating bread in the belief that it’s the body of a carpenter-turned-preacher who rose from the dead is as bizarre as hooking yourself up to an E-meter, like Scientologists, or baptising the dead, like Mormons. Yet there are striking similarities between the sects founded by Joseph Smith and L Ron Hubbard. These brilliant mavericks used popular culture to produce cosmologies that they marketed aggressively, though reserving some esoteric details for senior initiates.

Smith invented a journey by ancient Hebrews to America – a typical fantasy of the time – and dabbled in the occult. Hubbard mined the seam of mid-20th-century American science fiction, and also devised a brain-cleansing technique called Dianetics that was supposed to produce perfect recall. It failed hilariously.

Critics accused Smith and Hubbard of telling porkies. The former’s interpretation of the Egyptian papyri, which he encountered in a travelling mummy exhibition, is plain embarrassing. As for Hubbard, his war service was a work of the imagination to rival the science fiction he wrote before he discovered religion and its tax-exempt status. Both organisations are extremely interested in money, and very good at acquiring it.

The two prophets were heartily interested in the opposite sex: Smith acquired some 33 wives, while Hubbard encouraged teenage girl “officers” to wear hot pants.

Also, both religions went down the paramilitary route. We’ve read this week about the “Sea Org” that Katie Holmes allegedly feared her little daughter would be forced to join (a claim denied by the Church). But that’s nothing compared with the Mormon militia which fought in the Mexican-American war. Later, Mormon “avenging angels” were implicated in blood-curdling murders after they moved to Utah.

The Latter-day Saints cleaned up their act. But they were the Scientologists of their day – and they’re still evasive enough for the public to make the subliminal connection.

That’s why Mitt Romney, who dresses like a Mormon but flashes a Scientologist’s smile, must be worried by the Cruise-Holmes divorce. This year of all years, he doesn’t want the word “cult” splashed all over the front pages.

http://blogs.telegraph.co.uk/news/damia ... ientology/
 

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It's all a load of Kolobs.
 

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The Time Mormons Baptized Adolf Hitler and Vlad the Impaler
http://io9.com/5962336/the-time-mormons ... he-impaler
Keith Veronese

You probably knew that Mormons can baptize people who are already dead — but you probably didn't know quite how many historical figures the Mormon religious leaders have managed to baptize over the years.

Most of the time, when Mormons are baptizing the long-dead, it's because a current member of the faith wants to recruit his or her ancestors into the church. But at least some high-profile baptisms skipped over this requirement — arousing more than a little controversy. Like the time they decided to baptize Hitler. And hundreds of thousands of Holocaust victims.
Top image: Doctor Who, "Let's Kill Hitler"

Releasing the dead from Spirit Prison
So where does baptism for the dead even come from? It started at the same time as the Mormon faith itself: in the first half of the 19th century. Founder Joseph Smith endorsed this practice, as part of his spiritual revelation.

Currently, Mormons believe baptism is necessary for an individual to exit from "Spirit Prison" – a place akin to purgatory in the Catholic Church. Anyone outside the Mormon faith enters Spirit Prison at the time of their death.

By baptizing the dead, Mormons offer the people in Spirit Prison the option to accept Mormonism, and enter the Celestial Kingdom.

Full size
So how do you do it? Here's the process: A proxy, often a young adult over the age of 12, is submerged under water while a name or list of names is called out by an officiant, with the act of recitation confirming the baptism. These baptisms can only occur at Temples, of which there are 139 around the world.

The baptism, in the eyes of Mormons, does not make the baptized a Mormon. The act only gives the baptized the option to select Mormonism, if the church's view of the afterlife turns out to be correct. Taking this option into account, many Mormons look at this process as a "quantity over quality" situation, attempting to baptize as many individuals by proxy as possible.

Through this relatively mundane process of recitation and submersion, Mormon church members have baptized a number of historical figures. This list includes some particularly evil ones, like Vlad the Impaler and Adolf Hitler. Serial killer Ted Bundy is another individual to add to the "evil" category — but at least Bundy had practiced Mormonism while alive.

Full size
Constant Controversy
To aid in proxy baptism, the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints maintains the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah. The $8 million building allows members of the Mormon faith to research their desires to baptize their deceased family members. Over two billion names are currently within the genealogical database.

The LDS maintains a free geneological site, Family Search, as well as a user-restricted site, using this database.

In the course of baptizing as many of the dead as possible, Mormon followers baptized between 300,000 and 400,000 Jewish Holocaust victims, garnering the ire of religious groups across the world. Members also baptized Pope John Paul II four times in 2006.

The church claims that it no longer baptizes the deceased, unless they are direct relatives of a living member of the Church. Controversial baptisms can still occur, however, since a church member could submit almost any name for baptism, without any outside approval needed.

Baptizing family members outside of the Mormon faith is common, to ensure that the family is not separated in the afterlife. In 1993, church members baptized Mitt Romney's deceased father-in-law, Edward Roderick Davies, a life-long atheist.

Also, Mormons have baptized Richard Feynman, George Carlin, and Eazy-E, making for some interesting moments in the afterlife if the Mormon concept of life after death is correct.
 

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Mormon Chorley temple tax 'not human rights breach'
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-lancashire-26441993

European judges ruled the Mormon church must pay tax on a Chorley temple closed to the public after leaders claimed it was a breach of human rights.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints was told in 2005 it was not exempt from business rates because it is not providing a public service.

Leaders claimed discrimination, though the temple is eligible for an 80% reduction due to its charitable status,

But judges agreed with the House of Lords that the tax should be imposed.

'Sacred temple'
They ruled that denying the full rate exemption does not violate the church's members rights to show their religious beliefs.

Judges said the purpose of the exemption law was to benefit religious buildings which provided a service to the general public, and imposing the tax did not discriminate against the religion.

Though the Mormons have many chapels in the UK open to the public, they believe the temple is sacred and entrance is restricted.

Malcolm Adcock, UK spokesman for the Mormon faith, said the church respects the Strasbourg court's decision.

The religion has about 190,000 members in the UK.
 

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Mormon leader Thomas Monson fraud case thrown out
http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-26666144

Thomas Monson

Mormon leader Thomas Monson will not face prosecution in the UK

The head of the Mormon church will not appear in a British court over claims some of its teachings amount to fraud, a judge has ruled.

A former follower brought a private prosecution against Thomas Monson, president of the US-based Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints.

Tom Phillips claimed Mr Monson breached the Fraud Act by seeking money using "untrue or misleading" statements.

But District Judge Howard Riddle called it an "abuse" of the court process.

Speaking at Westminster Magistrates' Court, the judge said: "I am satisfied that the process of the court is being manipulated to provide a high-profile forum to attack the religious beliefs of others."

The summons alleged that, between February 2008 and December 2013, Mr Monson induced two men to pay an "annual tithe" based on teachings which were untrue.

These included that:

there were no deaths on Earth before 6,000 years ago
all humans are descended from two people who lived approximately 6,000 years ago
Joseph Smith translated the Book Of Mormon from ancient gold plates and it is historically accurate
Native Americans are descended from Israelites who left Jerusalem in 600BC
The summons, signed by District Judge Elizabeth Roscoe, had ordered Mr Monson to appear at Westminster and threatened arrest if he did not.

But Judge Riddle ruled the threat of arrest was "wrong" and should not have been made.

He described the attempted prosecution as "tenuous", with no chance of ever making it to trial even if Mr Monson attended.

"To convict, a jury would need to be sure that the religious teachings of the Mormon church are untrue or misleading," he said.

"No judge in a secular court in England and Wales would allow that issue to be put to a jury."

Neither Mr Phillips nor Mr Monson was in court for the hearing.
 

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Mormon Transhumanist Conference coming up, April 4
By: Philip K. Dick
Published: March 15, 2014
http://hplusmagazine.com/2014/03/15/mor ... p-april-4/

mta-thumb

Whether or not you agree with Mormon Transhumanist Association leader Lincoln Cannon that Mormonism is the most transhumanist religion, if you can make your way to Salt Lake City on April 4, you're sure to find yourself in the midst of some interesting discussions!


The 2014 conference of the Mormon Transhumanist Association will be held on 4 April 2014 from 9:00am to 6:00pm in Salt Lake City, Utah, at the Salt Lake City Public Library. Speakers and artists will present on the themes of Mormonism, Transhumanism and Transfigurism, with particular attention to topics at the intersection of technology, spirituality, science and religion. Keynote speakers will be Transhumanist designer and Humanity+ chair Natasha Vita-More, and Mormon philosopher Adam S. Miller. The conference is open to the public.

Natasha Vita-More, no doubt familiar to many readers, is a designer and theorist. She is a professor at the University of Advancing Technology, who received her doctorate from the Planetary Collegium, University of Plymouth, United King dom, where her thesis focuses on human enhancement and radical life extension. She is the designer and author of “Platform Di verse Body, Substrate Autonomous Person (fka “Primo Posthuman” - a future whole body prototype.) In 2013, she co-edited The Transhumanist Reader: Classical and Contemporary Essays on the Science, Technology, and Philosophy of the Human Future. In 1983, Vita-More authored the “Transhuman Manifesto”; and founded Transhumanist Arts and Culture in 1993. She was the Chair of “Vital Progress Summit” 2004, establishing a precedent for discussion of human enhancement. She was the president of the Extropy Institute 2002-2006. Vita-More is a proponent of morphological freedom and enhancing human biology. To give credence to her arguments, Vita-More supports the Proactionary Principle. In addition to academic works, she has exhibited at National Centre for Contemporary Arts, Brooks Memorial Museum, Institute of Contemporary Art, Women In Video, Telluride Film Festival, United States Environmental Film Festival and “Evolution Haute Couture: Art and Science in the Post-Biological Age”. She is published in more than two dozen journals and a contributing author to numerous books.

Adam S. Miller is a professor of philosophy at Collin College in McKinney, Texas. He and his wife, Gwen Miller, have three children. He received an MA and PhD in philosophy from Villanova University as well as a BA in Comparative Literature from Brigham Young University. He is the editor of An Experiment on the Word (Salt Press, 2011) and the author of Badiou, Marion, and St Paul: Immanent Grace (Continuum, 2008), Rube Goldberg Machines: Essays in Mormon Theology (Kofford, 2012), Speculative Grace: Bruno Latour and Object-Oriented Theology (Fordham University Press, 2013), and Letters to a Young Mormon (Maxwell Institute, 2014). He is the co-editor, with Joseph Spencer, of the book series Groundwork: Studies in Theory and Scripture, published by the Neal A. Maxwell Institute for Religious Scholarship and serves as the current director of the Mormon Theology Seminar.


The Mormon Transhumanist Association is an international nonprofit organization that promotes radical flourishing in compassion and creation through technology and religion. Although we are neither a religious organization nor affiliated with any religious organization, we support our members in their personal religious affiliations, Mormon or otherwise, and encourage them to adapt Transhumanism to their unique situations.
 

rynner2

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I'm having problems with an article about a conference next month, written by someone who died in 1982... :?
 

Mythopoeika

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rynner2 said:
I'm having problems with an article about a conference next month, written by someone who died in 1982... :?
Time traveller?
 

OneWingedBird

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Perhaps we are all dead and preserved in ice with electrodes in our brains, and the man we perceive as having died in 1982 is still alive?
 

ramonmercado

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rynner2 said:
I'm having problems with an article about a conference next month, written by someone who died in 1982... :?
I'm presuming its a nom de plume.
 

ramonmercado

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I would love to see a South Oark episode about this.

A trademark fight over the word 'Mormon'
COMMENTS (96)

Could the Catholic Church trademark a crucifix? Could the Jewish faith corner the market on the Star of David?

Obviously not, since the symbols of these thousands-of-years-old religions are firmly in the public domain. But what about a newer faith, established in a time of more robust intellectual property protections?

This is the gist of the debate going on in Texas, where the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS) is currently waging a legal battle with a dating site called Mormon Match over its use of the word "Mormon".

Intellectual Reserve Inc., the holding company for the LDS church, has a trademark on the word, as well as "Book of Mormon", "Mormon.org", "Mormon Tabernacle Choir", "The Mormon Church", "Mormon handicraft" and an outline of the Mormon temple in Salt Lake City, Utah.

The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) - which bills itself as "the leading non-profit organisation defending civil liberties in the digital world" - filed a friend-of-the-court brief last week in support of Jonathan Eller, the founder of Texas-based Mormon Match, as he tries to get a federal judge to permit him to use the word.

"The name of this service simply describes what it's doing - matching up Mormons," EFF's Corynne McSherry said in a statement. "Trademarks are supposed to be used to protect from unfair competition, not to stifle a small business or to control language."

Eric Hawkins, an LDS spokesperson, presented the church's position in a statement to ABC News:

We have made repeated attempts to resolve the issue without litigation, as we have in many comparable disputes over the years, including similar trademark applications. The objection of the church is that a for-profit business is trying to deceptively capitalise on the church's name and image to promote a product that has no affiliation with the church. By attempting to trademark the name, the group seeks to claim exclusive rights to use a term that is clearly associated with the church.

"When is a Mormon not a Mormon?" asks the consumerist's Kate Cos. "When he's a 'Mormon (trademark).'"

Jezebel's Kelly Faircloth says that it seems the LDS Church doesn't want anyone "making bank" off the Mormon name. She notes that both Mr Eller and his co-founder are Mormons.

"The next church barbecue is going to be really uncomfortable," she writes.

It's not the first time the LDS church has employed its lawyers to battle what it sees as intellectual property infringement. In 2007 it prevented a coffee shop in Utah from printing a likeness of the angel Moroni, whose statue stands atop many Mormon temples, in newspaper adverts.

"A standard criticism of the church is that it's more a business venture than a religion," writes Religion Dispatches' Holly Welker. "Actions like this lend credibility to the claim, and you'd think the church wouldn't want to make it seem any more valid."

According to Ars Technica, a federal judge in Texas will hold a hearing in the Mormon Match case on 8 August
http://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-echochambers-27708734
 

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Mormon church excommunicates prominent U.S. activist Kate Kelly

SALT LAKE CITY, June 23 (Reuters) - Prominent Mormon activist Kate Kelly was excommunicated by her church on Monday for violating its "laws and order" after advocating for women's ordination, a view that leaders of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said amounted to apostasy.

Kelly in 2013 founded the group Ordain Women, which has pushed for gender equality and has appealed to the faith's highest leaders to seek direction from God on the issue of women joining the priesthood.

A three-man panel held a church disciplinary hearing for her on Sunday in Virginia, where she lived until recently, and their verdict was delivered by email.

"Our determination is that you be excommunicated for conduct contrary to the laws and order of the Church," Kelly's former ecclesiastical leader in Virginia, Bishop Mark Harrison, said in the message.

"These conditions almost always last at least one year," it said, adding that if she showed "true repentance" and gave up teachings and actions that "undermine the Church, its leaders, and the doctrine of the priesthood," she could be readmitted.

Kelly, a former Washington human rights attorney, said the decision had forced her out of her community and her congregation and was exceptionally painful.

"Today is a tragic day for my family and me as we process the many ways this will impact us, both in this life and in the eternities," Kelly said in a statement.

Kelly is about to move overseas and did not attend the hearing, sometimes called a church court. Instead she wrote a letter defending herself and asking to keep her membership.

She has said she continues to believe in Mormon leaders and has suffered no crisis of faith, but rather has sincere questions about policies that bar women from the priesthood.

The actions of the Ordain Women group have caused tensions between the Utah-based church and the women, who say they are steadfast in their faith but want a more significant role in the life of a religion that claims more than 15 million global adherents. ...

http://news.msn.com/us/mormon-church-ex ... kate-kelly
 

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The Mormon church has admitted for the first time that its founder, Joseph Smith, took multiple wives. In an essay published on its website, the church said "careful estimates" put the number at between 30 and 40, including a 14-year-old and others who were already married.

The Mormon church banned polygamy in 1890, and now excommunicates anyone who practises it.

Church leaders had previously portrayed Joseph Smith as married to one woman. But the essay, entitled Plural Marriage in Kirtland and Nauvoo, said: "Joseph married many additional wives and authorised other Latter-day Saints to practise plural marriage." It said "plural marriage was difficult for all involved"; for Joseph Smith's first wife, Emma, it was an "excruciating ordeal". ...

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-30009324
 

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I bet you didn't know that LGBTQ Mormons in Utah had an organization. A hard-working one, too, evidently. And they got an anti-discrimination bill through the state legislature, though an imperfect one.
http://affirmation.org/a-mom-gets-involved/
 

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When the Mormons traveled across the Great Plains, the drank "Mormon tea" made from a plant called ephedra, which contains ephedrine, a stimulant and precursor to amphetamines. I also found this article about Joseph smith putting datura in the wine of his congregation http://www.abovetopsecret.com/forum/thread687983/pg1 he was also likely involved with peyote shamanism. His grandson Frederick smith claimed that peyote was central to the Mormon faith and that peyote was an important contribution of the lamanites(native Americans) http://askgramps.org/3580/does-mormon-church-forbid-use-peyote-by-mormons-native the Mormons have also been instrumental in legalizing peyote in Native American ceremonies with the ONAC Native American church. The Mormons have various other ties to peyotism.
 

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I still remember that famous Disney wildlife movie where all the Mormons ran en masse and threw themselves off a cliff. To this day, we still don't know why they do that.
 

GNC

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Are you sure the Mormons didn't force over a hundred innocent people over a cliff instead? They were a bit massacre-y way back when.
 

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Are you sure the Mormons didn't force over a hundred innocent people over a cliff instead? They were a bit massacre-y way back when.
No. I definitely remember the furry bodies and the teeth and them toppling over the cliff.
And Disney could never be wrong.
 

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incitement to religious intolerance

"Problems"? I quite agree.

Now, religion is each man's personal party (or it should be), but i believe i'm right in thinking that Mormons don't, as a rule, ingest toxins...Problem.

This, of course, brings them into direct conflict with the central tennents of the established English religion: Tea-drinking. Sorry, Mormonism's not for me, i have my beliefs... ;)

oh, here we go: http://www.lightplanet.com/mormons/daily/health/tea_eom.htm

text reads : Devout Latter-day Saints do not drink teas containing caffeine. This practice derives from an 1833 revelation known as the Word of Wisdom, which states that "hot drinks are not for the body or the belly" (D&C 89:9). Hyrum Smith, Assistant President of the Church, later defined "hot drinks" as coffee and tea (T&S 3 [June 1, 1842]:800), thereby establishing the official interpretation for later generations (see Doctrine and Covenants: Section 89). Caffeine, a cerebral and cardiovascular stimulant, has caused health concerns in recent years. The revelation has not been interpreted as proscribing herbal teas, for it states that "all wholesome herbs God hath ordained for the Constitution, nature, and use of man" (D&C 89:10).

HANG-ON: 'Wholesome Herbs' certainly sounds promising!
(sorry to stray off-thread a little soon)

G'day Yithian, (Australia here), there is a book 'Men of high degree', by a fellow called A.P. Elkin, which is about the Aboriginal 'Clever Men', Shamans, and there was a section quoting one of these Old Fellows, who reckoned that hot water wasn't good for them, so they abstained from tea drinking (yeah...I know!), and only drank cold water.
 

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Mormons who fell dangerously ill on their missions say the church denied them access to medical care.

Oliver had never left the United States when the Mormon church sent him on a mission in Chile in 2002. Eager to serve, the 19-year-old dove into missionary work. But after a few weeks, he began to experience crippling stomach pain. At first, Oliver was embarrassed by his ailment and tried to conceal it. After he lost 30 pounds, he approached the mission president’s wife—who was responsible for granting access to medical care—for help. She instructedhim to sprinkle fiber powder on his breakfast and refused to let him seek medical treatment. Over the next few months, he lost 20 more pounds and finally demanded that he speak to a doctor. The doctor prescribed deworming pills. Soon after he took them, Oliver excreted a several-inches-long parasite. His stomach and intestines were irreparably damaged.

http://www.slate.com/articles/healt...es_denied_access_to_adequate_health_care.html
 

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Norwich.
I got stopped by a pair of Mormons the other day in Norwich. Well, it was either Mormons or the Men in Black. Their opening gambit was "What's the best thing that's happened to you today?" I wasn't in the mood to banter with them so just brushed them off. You see them in these parts reasonably regularly - usually Americans. I believe they own a lot of land across East Anglia. The last time I saw them I was hurrying to Morrisons when they stopped to ask "What's the most important thing in life?" Again, I just wasn't in the mood for that sort of question.
 

Mythopoeika

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I got stopped by a pair of Mormons the other day in Norwich. Well, it was either Mormons or the Men in Black. Their opening gambit was "What's the best thing that's happened to you today?" I wasn't in the mood to banter with them so just brushed them off. You see them in these parts reasonably regularly - usually Americans. I believe they own a lot of land across East Anglia. The last time I saw them I was hurrying to Morrisons when they stopped to ask "What's the most important thing in life?" Again, I just wasn't in the mood for that sort of question.
I'd have replied 'avoiding Mormons' and walked off.
 
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