Nasty Neighbours

Mighty_Emperor

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A feud costing thousands

2003-10-20
by David A. Grant
Journal Reporter

BELLEVUE -- He lives in a purple and pink house with a flaming yellow ``flying boat'' tied down in his front yard a few steps from Lake Sammamish.

He's spent ,000 and counting on lawyers to fight his neighbors over issues such as noise, storm water runoff, easements and construction permitting.

By his own count, he's been visited by King County sheriff's deputies more than 100 times over a variety of complaints -- his and neighbors' -- since he built and moved into his tiny house in 1992.

Like the beat up Nomad trailer overgrown by blackberries at the head of his driveway, Ralph Guditz just doesn't seem to fit into this quiet, wooded lane of million-dollar homes.

Some neighbors disparagingly refer to his 400-square-foot home as the ``tool shed.'' They say his plane's too loud, his house is too loud and -- most of all -- Guditz is too loud.

It's Bellevue's version of a neighborhood feud.

After more than three years of trying, Guditz is on the verge of gaining the approval he needs to build six condominiums on his roughly one-third acre lot.

But his neighbors, led by several members of the Kelleran family, who own two of the five homes on the little road, have vowed to block the project. Lawyers, money and accusations are in motion.

Neighbors say Guditz's Widgeon Condominium project would detract from the character of their five-house neighborhood, increase traffic and disrupt the environment.

Guditz, in turn, points out that a 52-unit condominium complex lies just a few feet away from his property, on the other side of the neighborhood's only road.

Today the neighbors are scheduled to file an appeal with a state hearings board of recent decisions by King County and the City of Bellevue saying the project can move forward.

Their appeal will argue, among other things, that the condo project should never have been vested three years ago, just before the neighborhood was annexed into the City of Bellevue. They claim Guditz's application was incomplete and that there are problems related to widening the access road, as would be required of the project.

Michael Paine, an environmental issues planner with the city of Bellevue, said Guditz has a right to develop his property based upon the rules under which it was proposed three years ago. But that doesn't mean much to his neighbors.

``Most single-family residents want to see homes similar to what they have,'' Paine said. ``All these neighborhoods are evolving. You see Mediterranean-style mansions next to older ranch-style homes. You see those contrasts on Lake Sammamish. So this is not unusual.

``But the circumstances and personalities have driven this to a whole new dimension.''

One complicating circumstance is the fact that Guditz submitted his applications for his Widgeon Condominium project to King County planners in late 2000, shortly before the West Lake Sammamish neighborhood was annexed into the city of Bellevue in March 2001.

The same project would not be allowed today under Bellevue's zoning laws, Paine said, and that fact galls the Kellerans. The neighbors have spent ,000 fighting the plan and, as Brad Kelleran, said, ``It's just started.''

Linda Kelleran, who lives at the top of a sloping, wooded 2.3-acre property with her husband Brad just uphill from Guditz, is incensed that the 10-foot wide road would need to be widened to 22 feet and that several mature fir trees would need to be cut in order to build the condos.

The neighbors say a bigger road could affect a small stream running nearby and disrupt possible eagle nesting along the easement.

``We're all incensed about this,'' said Linda Kelleran, whose brother-in-law, Bruce Kelleran, lives on a waterfront lot below her. ``We don't want the development, don't want the road to change, don't want the trees cut.

``We think it should be a single-family neighborhood. That's the primary thing that all the neighbors feel.''

Ironically, Brad and Linda Kelleran are developers and own Kelleran Custom Homes, a builder of single-family houses mostly in Kirkland.

Guditz, meanwhile, calls the stream a drainage ditch and says he's never seen an eagle nest in the 11 years he's lived there. Furthermore, it's not his idea to widen the road -- it's a requirement.

He said he has played by all the rules and is proposing nothing prohibited by the King County zoning regulations under which he applied for his permits.

``I've been trying to leave for five years,'' Guditz said. ``It's my right to build the condominium project. I pay higher property taxes because of the multi-family zoning.

``I knew the zoning when I bought (the property), so shouldn't I be able to recover my investment?''

The neighbors have long since stopped talking with each other, leaving the battle of the condos to their lawyers.

But the condo project is just one of many clashes over the years. Guditz has complained about noise at a nearby bible camp, water runoff from an adjacent property and neighbors making improvements without proper permits.

His neighbors aren't too happy with him, either. They say his house is an eyesore, his plane is too loud and he is unfriendly.

Guditz's former next door neighbor from 1994 to 1998, Char Peacey, said she and her husband, Bob, moved out of their lakefront house because of ongoing run-ins.

``He was totally out of control,'' Peacey said. ``I know we spent at least ,000 in attorneys' fees for restraining orders (against him.)''

She accuses him of nearly running over her daughter, dumping trash in her driveway and running his plane out on the lake in the early morning hours.

When their home was up for sale, Peacey said, Guditz put up a sign facing her house saying that if his plane was tampered with, the transgression would be punishable by death.

For his part, Guditz denies trying to run over Peacey's daughter or dumping trash. He did post a sign concerning his airplane and admits he occasionally ran his plane early in the morning. He went to court to get a no-contact order of his own against the Peaceys.

Guditz also levels allegations of his own, saying Bob Peacey pointed a pistol at him in 1998.

Soon after that incident, Guditz painted his house purple and pink, which, according to Guditz, caused the Peaceys to lower the asking price on the home they were trying to sell by 0,000.

Char Peacey denies both accounts.

Also in 1998, Guditz said, he decided to built his condominium project, eventually naming it after his vintage 1944 Grumman Widgeon, a rare and unusual airplane in some ways a reflection of its owner.

After graduating with a masters degree in electrical engineering from MIT, Guditz, now 51, traveled west from Boston and in 1978 founded Fugu Ltd, a company that made computer-aided design software, in Palo Alto, Calif.

At its high point, Fugu had annual revenues of million and several offices worldwide, Guditz said. He moved the company to the Eastside in 1989, but in 2000 he quietly shut it down to pursue his passion for flying.

Along the way, Guditz has shown he is not afraid to take on foes large and small, in and out of court. In 1995, he created a stir when he challenged Microsoft Corp. over telephone calls meant for the software giant that were flooding the offices of Fugu. The problem: the unrelated companies' main phone numbers were one digit apart, resulting in countless misdirected calls.

After trying to resolve the problem for years, Guditz said, he began redirecting the errant calls to one of Microsoft's in-house attorneys. Microsoft threatened to sue, but never did and the issue was resolved quietly.

Today Guditz spends most of his time in Anchorage, where he owns a townhouse and is trying to build an airplane charter business.

All he wants to do now, he said, is build his condominiums and move on.

Michael Paine, the Bellevue planner, said the condo project annoys neighbors who expected that annexation into the city would protect their neighborhood from such a development.

``It's really different parties trying to protect their economic interests,'' Paine said. ``That's what it boils down to.

``It's more than a garden-variety development dispute. It's exacerbated by the characters involved. The degree of vehemence and persistence is unusual.''
http://www.kingcountyjournal.com/sited/story/html/146551

to get a better idea of this you do nee to see the picture:



Emps
 

TheOriginalCujo

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It's difficult to be sure from such a small image but I think the house/plane combo looks great. I'd love to live near something like that.

Though I think I'd be farely unhappy if he ran the plane in the early hours more than once.

Cujo
 

rynner2

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Noisy neighbours drive 500,000 from their homes
Dipesh Gadher

ABOUT half-a-million people in Britain have been forced to move home in the past year because of noisy neighbours, researchers have found.
More than a third of people (36%) claim that noise made by those around them had a detrimental impact on their lives, with those living in London and those in rented council accommodation suffering the most.

Children, noisy cars, car alarms, motorbikes and neighbours arguing are the most annoying, according to an Ipsos Mori poll commissioned by the National Society for Clean Air and Environmental Protection (NSCA).

The poll of just under 2,000 people aged 15 and above shows that 14% of the public have been woken up at night by noisy neighbours. Women are more likely than men to be kept awake.

About 5% of those who responded to the survey said they had argued with their neighbours in the past year over noise issues, while 1% claimed they had been forced to move because things had got so bad.

If reflected nationally, that would mean almost 500,000 people have taken such drastic action, according to the NSCA.

Last year Richard Oluwadare, 41, was served with an antisocial behaviour order that prevents him returning to his east London home for two years after a six-year campaign of loud DIY banging, stamping and playing loud music to torment his neighbours.

Ethel Preston, 104, who is hard of hearing, was served with a noise abatement order after she upset neighbours in Woodhouse Eaves, Leicestershire, by turning her television up to to full volume. One neighbour said he was forced to sleep in his car to escape the noise. :shock:

Ben Bradshaw, an environment minister, said: “Noise can make people’s lives a misery and damage health. We all have a responsibility to be considerate.”

Almost a quarter of respondents said that teenagers made the most noise in their area. In Wales, 12% claimed students were the noisiest. Nationally, 4% agreed.

Scottish residents are affected the most by noise from pubs and clubs, with 14% also claiming that their neighbours’ footsteps were a nuisance, compared with 7% of people nationally. This might be explained by the large number of shared tenement blocks in cities such as Glasgow and Edinburgh in which many flats have stripped wooden floorboards.

Almost half of all Londoners (48%) — the highest proportion in the country — said their quality of life was affected by noise pollution.

Cars with throbbing engines and loud stereos are among the most commonly cited sources of unwanted noise.

Edmund King, executive director of the RAC Foundation, said: “We would encourage decibel-loving drivers to resist the temptation to pump up the volume.

“Not only is loud music a nuisance to others, it could also be a cause of accidents on the roads.

“Although the decrease in reaction time from playing loud music translates into mere fractions of a second, on the UK’s busy roads, this reduction could mean the difference between a hit or a miss.”

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0, ... 47,00.html
 

Graylien

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Too true. I moved out of my old flat (which I was really rather fond of) simply because I had a rave music fan who never seemed to sleep on one side of me, a wailing baby on the other, and a noisy Rottweiler together with a restless fat man overhead.

Building flats with some kind of noise insulation fitted as standard would be a step in the right direction.
 

rynner2

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I'm trying to move from here for mobility reasons, but it would be heaven to also escape the noise and potential threat from certain neighbours...
 

WhistlingJack

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rynner said:
Ethel Preston, 104, who is hard of hearing, was served with a noise abatement order after she upset neighbours in Woodhouse Eaves, Leicestershire, by turning her television up to to full volume. One neighbour said he was forced to sleep in his car to escape the noise. :shock:
It may seem harsh, but I can understand that. My former next-door neighbour was a lovely gentleman, but as he grew older (he was 90+ when he eventually went to the home were he is now), his hearing got progressively worse and it got to the point where if we were both watching the same channel on TV, we could mute the sound and still follow the programme via the sound from next door - we were prepared to put up with it, but if you were driven to distraction by someone's inabilty to use subtitles, then I can understand such action being taken.
 

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When my kids were teenagers we lived in an end terrace where the 'joined' neighbour was deaf. I used to say, play your music loudly if you like, but if I can't actually hear myself talk I may have to ask you to turn it down. ;)

We never had any complaints.

Later we moved to a larger terraced house with deaf neighbours on BOTH sides. Both used to play their TVs very loudly, one at night, one in the morning. Didn't bother us.

One of those neighbours has died and been replaced by a large family, who are understandably noisy and whose parents have very interesting and clearly audible rows in the early hours.

The other neighbour still plays his TV at full blast until 1am or later, in his bedreem next to mine. Does all this noise bother me? Nope. Live and let live. 8)
 
A

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When I lived in Camberwell (a vibrant noisy area in London), I used to work from my flat. By and large I had no major problems with noise - even living across the road from a yardie club (with shootings) and a huge nightclub on the corner. However, a new neighbour moved in next door and played dance music from early morning to late at night. At first, I thought live and let live. Then it started to interfere with incoming phone calls (he must've bought even 'louder' speakers). I asked politely if he could turn it down in the mornings and afternoon and was greeted with a fuck off and a slammed door in the face - to which, calmly, I did not respond. I called the police, who told to me to call the noise abatement people (or whatever theyare called). I heard nothing back - I rang them, and they told me they couldn't do anything. Soooooo....I went round once more and asked nicely. Fuck off and slam. Sooooo, I went round again, kept the door open with a well placed foot and threatened the selfish sod. Simply put, I told him that I would come back, fill him in and smash his stereo. I told him I didn't mind his playing of music, but in the day, some of us are working. Once I had established the situation, the guy became very reasonable and we became sort of friends - indeed, I still see this bloke about every two months or so. Sometimes, just sometimes, you need to put your foot down. Live and live is all very well (and a noble state to aspire to), sometimes there needs to be a form of parity. I do not recommend threatening in most situations, but my company and livlihood depended on being able to talk to people over the phone. My only regret that I was driven to emotion - but it was the catalyst that resolved the situation...cognition and friendliness maintained the situation.
 

fluffle9

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WhistlingJack said:
rynner said:
Ethel Preston, 104, who is hard of hearing, was served with a noise abatement order after she upset neighbours in Woodhouse Eaves, Leicestershire, by turning her television up to to full volume. One neighbour said he was forced to sleep in his car to escape the noise. :shock:
It may seem harsh, but I can understand that. My former next-door neighbour was a lovely gentleman, but as he grew older (he was 90+ when he eventually went to the home were he is now), his hearing got progressively worse and it got to the point where if we were both watching the same channel on TV, we could mute the sound and still follow the programme via the sound from next door - we were prepared to put up with it, but if you were driven to distraction by someone's inabilty to use subtitles, then I can understand such action being taken.
I don't think it's at all harsh. I don't care if she's 104, she was being an inconsiderate moron. If you're too deaf to hear the telly and don't want to use subtitles, get headphones (I presume the neighbours suggested this to her if she didn't think of it herself).
 

rynner2

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escargot1 said:
Does all this noise bother me? Nope. Live and let live. 8)
You must be a saint.

I've suffered two evil, noisy neighbours. One threatened to kill me when I complained, but I faced up to him and then called the police. He's been better since then with me, although he was in court recently over a fracas with another tenant here (which resulted in the other tenant moving out).

The other evil druggie noisy neighbour was also very provocative, despite being under a restriction order, and the Police took no action when he trashed the communal areas one night. (Apparently there were 'no witnesses' - well, no-one actually saw him doing it, but all the other tenants heard it, and knew who it was... :roll: )

Luckily for us, he was banged up shortly afterwards on the charge of attempted murder of his wife.

On a lesser but still annoying level, I've suffered from 'thin wall syndrome' with perfectly normal neighbours. But if they sit up talking into the wee hours when I'm trying to sleep, or go to bed themselves and then SNORE, it's very perturbing, and leaves me tired and short-tempered.

All I ask is peace on Earth - is that too much to ask? [sigh]
 

mindalai

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I'm lucky because don't have noisy neighbours (nosy, yes, noisy no), although I have had in the past. I can stongly recommend sleeping with earplugs in. I still do it now even though I don't have the noisy neighbours any more. It makes me sleep much more deeply.
 

zoltan_g

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All these stories make me glad that I live in the middle of nowhere with only 1 set of neighbours!
 

butterfly27

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I had this problem in reverse - a downstairs neighbour who was stone deaf but who waged a hate campaign against me for the wild parties I was allegedly having every night. (Chance'd be a fine thing!) This hate campaign included throwing bricks at my back door, even tho she was in her 70s, - I was glad it wasn't a downstairs flat because she wouldn't have hesitated to put the windows out. Eventually she started on the next-door neighbours as well and so we were able to bring closure to the situation by attending her GP as a delegation. Because she was stone deaf it was easy to persuade the doc that something was amiss. It turned out that she was in the advanced stages of dementia and all the noise was in her own head. She was put into a care home and then I had a procession of her relatives hounding me for "driving" their mother, aunt etc into a home. It could only happen to me! :cry:
I think the worst part was having to listen to Songs of Praise at full volume every week, accompanied by her tone deaf caterwauling. :roll:
 

filcee

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My noisy neighbour has moved out, a 30-something, alcoholic ex-squaddie. He used to come in from the pub at 2-3am, screaming (literally) drunk, slamming all the doors on the way through the block of flats we live in. After getting into his flat the music would start at full volume, accompanied with bloody awful singing. He was always polite though when I went to hammer on the door, to ask him to turn it down, always asking me if I wanted a drink. The music would go off for half an hour, then come back with a vengeance. This would go on 'til about 5-6am, then he'd eventually sleep. Which is when the nightmares started, he'd be screaming his head off, shouting for his da, his CO, or screaming in general. He also had long, loud arguments with himself about not belonging, only following orders and things that weren't right. We found out on a long night sat up drinking and talking with him (if you can't beat 'em, join 'em) the music went on to cover the silence in his flat ('cos the silence scared him), and to make sure I went round - he wanted human contact that much, even me yelling at him would do...

The last we heard of him, he'd tried counselling but it hadn't worked, and he was going back to Iraq as 'private security'...
 

escargot

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When I said 'live and let live' I was referring to only my own situation. I'm presently lucky enough to only have to put up with reasonable noise, for understandable reasons, from otherwise friendly neighbours. I do know what 'bad' neighbours are like though. They could drive you mad.

Luckily I've found that the worst offenders seem to get murdered, carted off to prison or sectioned, if I wait long enough. :D

Near here there seem to be two houses next to each other between which the families trade insults and threats at all hours. I can hear them from the back of my house if the window's open. Must be hell for their close neighbours.
 

rynner2

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Giant leylandii in suburban front garden incense neighbours
Plymouth residents have complained to the council about the 10-metre trees outside David Alvand's home
Peter Walker guardian.co.uk, Monday 6 September 2010 21.06 BST

It is probably safe to assume that David Alvand likes his privacy. Firstly the civil engineer spent 12 years fighting a court battle over a 3.6-metre (12ft) concrete wall which he erected without planning permission around his back garden.

It was finally dismantled just before the case reached the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR).

Now it is the front of Alvand's suburban semi-detached house in Plymouth, Devon, which has agitated the neighbours.

They have launched a formal complaint under antisocial behaviour legislation to force him to cut back the vast leyland cypress trees completely filling the front garden.

Planted in 1991, shortly after the 66-year-old moved into the area, the famously fast-growing trees – better known as leylandii and the source of countless previous neighbourly disputes, some turning violent – are now more than 10 metres tall.

As well as completely obscuring the front of Alvand's home, their higher branches overhang his neighbours' roofs, as well as the pavement.

One neighbour said: "That wall took years to sort out. It's been a nightmare. Now the trees are an eyesore – they block out sunlight and make the street look bad." [pic on page]

Alvand, however, said he was being unfairly targeted: "I have been chased for two decades over the state of my gardens. I feel victimised. The neighbours are complaining because they have a vendetta against me. I am a law abiding citizen and I have suffered for 20 years being chased over my wall and trees. It's my land."

Alvand was almost jailed in 2003 for refusing to remove the concrete breeze block barrier, known among neighbours as "the Berlin Wall" and built despite the council refusing planning permission. He claimed the structure, topped with corrugated iron, was in fact a greenhouse and thus did not need consent.

After three appeals, a public meeting, a hearing at a magistrates court, two at the high court and one before the appeal court in London, and shortly before the case reached the ECHR, Plymouth council was granted the right for Alvand to be jailed while it removed the wall. Alvand, who had cost the council £20,000 in legal fees, then backed down.

The council says it is investigating the leylandii but hopes the case can be solved through mediation.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/sep/0 ... th-dispute
 

ramonmercado

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After three appeals, a public meeting, a hearing at a magistrates court, two at the high court and one before the appeal court in London, and shortly before the case reached the ECHR, Plymouth council was granted the right for Alvand to be jailed while it removed the wall. Alvand, who had cost the council £20,000 in legal fees, then backed down.
OMIGAWD!
 

Kondoru

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I find the practice of ringbarking works wonders...
 

Mythopoeika

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He's really let that get out of hand. You can't even see the house!
It must get very dark in that house.
 

Timble2

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I supect he likes it that way....
 

locussolus

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I remember in college, a neighbor painted their roof with a giant FU and placed tons of stuffed toys all over the roof as well. This was done in reaction to complaints about "home and landscaping decorations" that were of a less conventional nature. (Toilet bowl planters, statues, found objects ect.

I looked for a news article, but typing in "Offensive Roof Painting in New Jersey" is a whopper. :D
 

Spudrick68

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It has to be some form of mental illness, like Mr Trebus, except with Leylandii.
 

FelixAntonius

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Spudrick68 said:
It has to be some form of mental illness, like Mr Trebus, except with Leylandii.
He probably is mentaly ill, note how after all his actions, he is the one who feels victimised, there is a vendetta & he is law abiding etc....

Mind you, in some ways it sounds like the comments made by travelers on illegal sites.......... A total denial that they have done anything wrong & that their own actions might in some way be illegal or anti social.
 

stu neville

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Alvand was almost jailed in 2003 for refusing to remove the (12 ft) concrete breeze block barrier, known among neighbours as "the Berlin Wall" and built despite the council refusing planning permission. He claimed the structure, topped with corrugated iron, was in fact a greenhouse and thus did not need consent.
I think that tells you all you need to know about his state of mind.
 

FelixAntonius

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Someone else with the same feelings of persecution:-

Queen's former banker fights to close Pilgrim's Way.

An ex-banker to the Queen has urged a public inquiry to allow him to close part of Chaucer's Pilgrims Way that runs over his estate by telling inspectors they should remember they are not in Zimbabwe or Cuba or Scotland.

The property of Mr Steel who put up padlocked metal gates and barbed wire Photo: CEN Timothy Steel who is the former vice chairman of the Queens investment bankers Cazenove has become embroiled in a battle with villagers over the ancient paths across the woodlands in Kent near Adisham.

Yesterday he handed a dossier of evidence to the inspectors – including a letter which he wrote and sent to Adisham parish council.

Free the police to tackle the criminals on Britain's streets. In the letter he said villagers seemed to "view land ownership with a mixture of envy and contempt" and added that the attempts by locals to walk over private land "might have resonance in Zimbabwe, Cuba and possibly Scotland, but it is an anachronistic form of totalitarian thinking, which has been abandoned by most other former Communist regimes."

He also accused locals of a vendetta against him and said he would "not be bullied into allowing the right to roam at all times" over either his land – or that of his brother-in-law Lord Hawarden.

The inquiry opened last month with evidence from villagers and restarted with testimony from another local walker – Sir Geoffrey Nice QC – who was the war crimes prosecutor in the trial of Slobodan Milosevic at The Hague.

The inquiry is expected to close this week to decide the matter.

Villagers from Adisham had protested to Kent County Council after three paths used by walkers and horse riders were closed off by Mr Steel, who put up padlocked metal gates and barbed wire and signs ordering them to keep out.

Retired businessman and protest organiser David Leidig, 73, said: "I used to walk my dogs there almost every day, then suddenly there were gamekeepers driving around on quad bikes chasing people away."

The villagers appeal, which included more than 100 testimonies from people who had used the paths going back to 1927, was accepted by the council after an eight-year battle, and the council ordered the paths registered as public rights of way.

But despite the decision, the gates have remained in place and following an appeal by Mr Steel, the public inquiry was ordered.

Source: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstop ... s-Way.html
 

Kondoru

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Are the villagers causing trouble and trashing the place?

Right to roam works very well in Scotland except close to the cities where they get troublemakers.

Same as in Scandanavia
 

OneWingedBird

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He probably is mentaly ill, note how after all his actions, he is the one who feels victimised, there is a vendetta & he is law abiding etc....
isn't that just every complete c u next tuesday you ever came across? :lol: that doesn't imply mental illness, just a nasty piece of work.

this one is in my local news today, it's no bad thing that the scumbag has finally been evicted but it's pretty nasty he's succeeded in driving 3 people out of their homes first :(

Leeds minister driven out by thug EXCLUSIVE

A gay minister has been forced to move into a caravan after suffering months of abuse at the hands of a teenage neighbour.
The Reverend Christopher Denton left Moor Grange Court in West Park, Leeds – his home for almost 20 years – after he was allegedly tormented with homophobic insults and threats from next-door neighbour Alex Adams, 19.

Adams, who moved into a first-floor flat in April 2009, drove three
residents from their homes after a string of reported incidents, including violence, criminal damage and late-night parties with gangs of youths.

But his reign of terror has been ended. Yesterday at Leeds Magistrates' Court he was evicted from the nine-storey block of flats, with 16 witnesses arriving to give evidence about his bad behaviour.

Granting a premises closure order, District Judge David Kitson said: "There are some 31 complaints in total, ranging from loud music, abusive and vulgar language, violence and threats of violence against neighbours who have dared to complain.

"Large numbers of young people congregate at the premises at all hours, often in drink, creating such concern and fear for the residents that three of them have left the flats and are frightened to return whilst Mr Adams remains a threat."

Leeds City Council applied for the closure order after a string of complaints from neighbours, including intimidating behaviour from Adams and his visitors, who were accused of shouting lewd comments at schoolgirls and who once allegedly threw a fridge from the balcony.

The parties often escalated into violence between gangs of youths, residents had complained. Screaming and swearing was also heard coming from the flat and damage was caused to communal areas.

Some residents spoke of suffering threats at the hands of Adams.
Adams, who lived with his brother Daniel, 24, attended yesterday's hearing but did not contest the application from Leeds City Council, which is also applying at Leeds County Court for possession of the flat.

After the hearing, Inspector Simon Jessup, of the north west inner neighbourhood policing team, said: "This is great news for residents of Moor Grange Court. It is completely unacceptable for people to behave in (this] way.

"This case clearly shows the sort of action we can take alongside our partners in the council to bring a lasting long-term solution."
http://www.yorkshireeveningpost.co.uk/n ... 6519015.jp
 

ramonmercado

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Woman evicted from Cornwall home over bad behaviour
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-cornwall-11292353

A woman has been evicted from her home in Saltash after putting neighbours through three years of torment because of her anti-social behaviour.

The house in Wentworth Way has been boarded up for three months after police were granted a closure order.

Incidents leading to the order being given included drug use, drunken antics, fighting and abusive language.

Police said that 8% of calls regarding anti-social behaviour over the past six months in Saltash related to the house.

The closure order was sought following consultation with Cornwall Council and resulted in police, council officials and Sanctuary Housing attending the property to close it up.

Insp Martin Williams, from Saltash, said: "The residents have endured this behaviour over a period of three years and as a result of all the ongoing anti-social behaviour we have taken decisive action."

Sanctuary Housing said that during the closure order it would take "the necessary action to find a permanent solution to the nuisance neighbours have been experiencing".

It said: "Sanctuary will take whatever steps are necessary to prevent, or put a stop to anti-social behaviour and hope that this closure order acts as a deterrent to others who fail to show consideration towards their neighbours."
 

rynner2

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rynner2 said:
Giant leylandii in suburban front garden incense neighbours
Plymouth residents have complained to the council about the 10-metre trees outside David Alvand's home
Peter Walker guardian.co.uk, Monday 6 September 2010 21.06 BST

http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2010/sep/0 ... th-dispute
Developments - of a sort!

Still hacking off the neighbours: Owner of 35ft leylandii finally gets out clippers... to trim the BOTTOM
By Daily Mail Reporter
Last updated at 12:50 AM on 8th October 2010

After months of wrangling, residents thought the end of the dispute was near.

Armed with ladder and hedge clippers, David Alvand decided that Wednesday night was the time to chop down his monster 35ft leylandii trees.

However the 66-year-old had a different idea of what constituted a trim from the rest of his neighbours in Plymouth, Devon.
He stopped after trimming just a few of the lower branches and left the cuttings piled up outside his home

Now according to residents of the street, the trees look even worse, and his half-hearted attempt has caused further outrage

Residents of the street, who have already complained to Plymouth City Council regarding the trees, say they hoped he would have trimmed them back further.
Michael Jennes, who lives opposite, said the trees were still as tall as they had ever been and branded Alvand a 'disgrace'.
He said: 'They have been there for 20 years now and I think it's a disgrace. This is a start but the only thing that would make it better is if he took it all down.'

Another resident, who did not want to be named, said the trees were a 'horrible eyesore' and now looked even worse.
She added: 'We saw him come out and start trimming, but he has stopped well short in my opinion. It looks a real mess - even worse than before.

'Those trees are a horrible eyesore. I think someone needs to get him a bigger ladder so he can reach the top.'

etc...

A council spokesman said Alvand had returned forms stating his case for keeping the trees and an investigation was underway.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article ... OTTOM.html
(with pics)
 
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