Near-Death & Out of Body Experiences

brianellwood

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#31
As far as I know, the build up of static electricity depends on how well insulated you are from the ground, in other words the insulating quality of your shoes, and to a lesser degree, the humidity of the air around you. So if you have good insulation, the charge that you pick up (from friction, tv sets, video monitors etc) can be held in your body for quite some time.
 
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Anonymous

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#32
Thanks for that, B. So it looks like my shocks are explicable, after all - what a disappointment. It's not due to some mysterious paranormal force emanating from my local Sainsburys, just bloody computers!!! (Again)
 

mikelegs

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#33
In my own shock experience, relative humidity played a pretty large role. When I travelled to Tucson, AZ for work, I would discharge myself on the car before walking about 30 feet over paved parking lot to the front door. I'd usually get another pretty good shock when I reached out for that metal handle. Annoyed the heck out of me.
 
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Anonymous

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#34
I get shocks from cars when I wear rubber soled shoes. Especially in summer. I think that is normal. Quite a jolt sometimes. I now touch the ground as I touch the door or body getting out - provided that nobody is around to see.

I gave up on battery powered watches and now have a rather nice (Russian) wind up Poljot Aviator thanks to my geek girlfriend.

Quartz watches always failed on me even with new batteries. They'd start working sometime after I took them off. I assume that kinetic charging electric watches would be the same. Psion organisers etc - I gave up on for similar reasons. Always had power problems.
 
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Anonymous

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#35
I can't wear a watch. I tried for years. Cheap watches. Expensive watches. Supposedly unbreakable watches. They all stop after a month or so. The most spectacular was the Swatch that imploded as I climbed a mountain.

I also get electric shocks off lift buttons, escalators and sundry inanimate objects... and sometimes when I shake hands with people. And my hair stands on end at the hint of a comb or brush.

Funny, really, because I've always had this weird pylon/electricity phobia. :confused:
 
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FraterLibre

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#36
NDE Update: Non Physical Consciousness?

from: http://www.wired.com/news/medtech/0,1286,55826,00.html

Two British scientists are seeking £165,000 ($256,000) to carry out a large-scale study to discover if clinically dead people really have out-of-body experiences.
Sam Parnia, senior research fellow at the University of Southampton, and Dr. Peter Fenwick, a consultant neuropsychiatrist at Oxford University, are both highly respected researchers.
Near-death experiences are the most common experience and include seeing a white light, while out-of-body experiences involve serenely observing one's dead body while medics work frantically to resuscitate it. The researchers have founded a charitable trust, Horizon Research, to promote studies in the field.
Last year Parnia published a study indicating that 10 percent of clinically dead patients who were later resuscitated reported memories while they were lifeless.
Evidence includes patients recognizing hospital staff they had never met but who helped during their resuscitation. Others have recalled conversations between doctors.
According to known medical science, this should be impossible, given the absence of any brain activity.
In the past, the theory has been scorned by the scientific community. Even those who want to believe the truth is out there have turned skeptical.
Susan Blackmore was once the doyenne of British paranormal research. She has since retired, disillusioned, from the field. She concluded in her book about near-death experiences, Dying to Live, that there are scientific explanations for NDEs.
While skepticism remains, scientists are coming to recognize that more research is necessary. In December 2001, a Dutch neurologist, Dr. Pim van Lommel of Hospital Rijnstate in Arnhem, Netherlands, led a team that published an article in The Lancet, the United Kingdom's highly respected journal of medicine. The study showed that 18 percent of clinically dead patients, later resuscitated, recalled near-death experiences years after the event.
Another study, this one conducted in the United States by the father of near-death-experience studies, Kenneth Ring, used blind patients, resuscitated from cardiac arrest, who likewise described seeing their body while clinically dead, although slightly out of focus. The book Mindsight was inspired by this research.
Fenwick and others are not positing life after death per se, merely consciousness after death.
Nevertheless, the implications are enormous. If near-death experiences and out-of-body experiences don't come from the brain, where is consciousness based?
"There are two ways to view the universe," says Fenwick. "Our current world model is that everything is matter."
In other words, everything that we think of as "real" in scientific terms has a physical form that can be perceived by our senses. But this model, which philosophers call "radical materialism," cannot explain the existence of consciousness, which has no physical essence.
So how do we account for consciousness? "There's a little (unexplained) miracle, and consciousness arises," Fenwick says of the current paradigm.
However, another theory proposes that the basic building block of the universe is not matter but instead consciousness itself. This is described as the "transcendent" view, a perspective shared by many of the world's religions.
"This second, transcendent, view of the universe makes it much easier to understand NDEs (near-death experiences)," says Fenwick, who believes that science will eventually replace the material view of the universe with the transcendent one.
The advent of quantum mechanics, which posits that matter can simultaneously have both a physical form and a wave form is a step in that direction, he says.
So are scientific studies of the power of prayer, which suggest that subjects benefit from the prayers of others even when they aren't aware that someone is praying for them.
These studies have been interpreted by some researchers as an indication that consciousness behaves as a field, much like magnetism, which can be affected by other fields. If that's true, then it's possible one person's consciousness could affect another person's.
Now Fenwick and Parnia hope to add new near-death-experience and out-of-body-experience research to these findings. If they can raise the cash, they intend to study 100 reanimated heart-attack victims who had near-death experiences. Research has shown that 30 of them can be expected to have out-of-body experiences. Fenwick and Parnia plan to place cards above the patients' heads that can only be seen from the ceiling, where those who experience out-of-body experiences claim to watch their resuscitation.
So will this convince the skeptics? "No, nothing will, but that's OK," says Fenwick, laughing. "It's how science progresses. Any research that says you have to have a major rethink in your world model is always rejected. But it will prove that consciousness is not in the brain."
Another thing the research proves is that there's life left yet in speculating about the afterlife.




"One age misunderstands another; and an age without vision misunderstands all others in its own nasty way."
-- Ludwig Wittgenstein
 
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Anonymous

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#37
Last night's NDE documentary on BBC2

"The Day I died", BBC2 06/02/03 21:00

Not exactly ghosts, but definitely not 'new science' (not enough actual science: see below), and not convinced it's parapsychology either, so here it is in the Ghosts board.

Pretty disappointing I thought. At the start they talked about 'proper scientific studies' into Near Death Experience that eschew 'anecdotal evidence', and then the rest of the entire damn program was ALL anecdotal evidence. :rolleyes:

Even the US songwriter woman, while initially impressive, it became clear upon further inspection that her case too boiled down to nothing better than anecdote. :(

If this program is any indication, NDE investigators are going to need to start monitoring operations as they happen on the 'off chance' that the patient dies on the table and is then resuscitated telling of NDE's while the details (like bone saws that look like electric toothbrushes) can be objectively confirmed at the time.

Anyone else see it?
 

Cult_of_Mana

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#38
Sorry Zygon, but I'm a little confused by your post. Are you objecting to patients being interviewed or do you want NDE's validated by brain-scans or somesuch?

I thought that the 'big question' behind this programme was whether a type of conscienceness could exist when all neural activity had ceased. The American woman's case was the only one found to support this possibility.

My personal feeling is that our instruments for monitoring brain activity are not sensitive enough. Afterall, when neurones are 'talking' it's just a bit of fancy chemistry. What is there to stop all these chemical reactions? Who knows how long these things carry on for after the the blood supply has been cut-off? I believe that we have not yet determined the true point of brain-death.

Now if we could bring a person back after a fatal dose of cyanide, that could be interesting...
 

taras

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#39
Any illusion of that programme being useful/factual mostly ended for me when the woman started going on about "standing in the breath of God". The guy whose life was completely turned around from being a fat cat CEO to becoming a counsellor was interesting, but surely someone who had almost died would value life more even without an NDE.
 

The late Pete Younger

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#40
I think when the end comes thats it, I dont think we get reborn, there has never been any definitive evidence of life after death and why do people worry about it, just human nature I guess.
 
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Anonymous

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#41
I for one am very interested in Roger Penrose's theory of quantum consciousness and the possibility of entanglement - although quite how that allows out-of-body or near-death experience is a bit problematic-

what is the 'soul' supposed to be 'entangled' with?
Thin air?

Now identical, monozygotic twins, yes.
they probly stay entangled all their lives.
Definitely some food for thought,
and a fount for endless Bulls**t.
 
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Anonymous

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#42
Is There Anybody There? You Just Keep Me Hanging On!

Eburacum45 said:
what is the 'soul' supposed to be 'entangled' with?
Thin air?

Now identical, monozygotic twins, yes.
they probly stay entangled all their lives.
Definitely some food for thought,
and a fount for endless Bulls**t.
Two excellent points, E.

Maybe they mean that the the entanglement factor enables the fine structures in the cells to snatch some part of the beingness of the luminiferous ether and trap it in a physical, material structure. And that on death, that node of personal being, the 'I' is released again. Temporarily to haunt the worldly reality it has come to recognise as home, before entering the greater reality of everythingness through the 'Tunnel of Light?'

Or, maybe not. :p

We Were Raised 1200 miles Apart And We Both Married Pig Farmers called Zebediah!

As to identical twins I think the concept of some sort of quantum entanglement to explain the strange synchronicities, overlaps and apparent esp events between them is a bit more likely than some bizarre genetically programmed dispostion to marry partners with the same jobs and first names. ;)

Oh! Yeah!

I found it interesting the way the programme brought in Dr Susan Blackmore, let her have her say and quickly past on to lusher pastures. As if she was a batty aunt at a wedding reception.

Mind you if they'd taken her too seriously they'd have had a shorter and more boring programme. ;)
 

minordrag

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#43
Buddha put forth the doctrine of Annata, in which he denied the existence of the soul. Indeed, there could be a consciousness that persists throughout several incarnations, but it is only a "bundle" of thoughts, desires, emotions and memories. It's anihillated through enlightenment. So, something to look forward to there.

He did have a good point, though, and one that nags at me. What is the soul? Is it one's body, mind, feelings, senses or consciousness? All of these things are mutable, so how could there be an immutable soul?

Time for second cup of coffee. Transient, but delicious!
 
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Anonymous

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#44
Mana said:
Sorry Zygon, but I'm a little confused by your post. Are you objecting to patients being interviewed or do you want NDE's validated by brain-scans or somesuch?
I'm objecting to the anecdotes that the patients recount (about their subjective interpretation of their experiences) being accepted as 'evidence' of NDE when there is no more objective corroboration than the vague recollections of what happened from the stressed-out medical staff who were more concerned with trying to revive the patient than with making accurate recordings of their every little action and utterance.

If the resuscitation procedure was, for example, videotaped, it would allow the video record of the events to be compared with the anecdotes told by the NDE subjects about what they think they saw, and might provide solid evidence -one way or the other- for the first time. Or, at the very least, a solid scientific basis for further study.
 
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Anonymous

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#45
Mana said:
I thought that the 'big question' behind this programme was whether a type of conscienceness could exist when all neural activity had ceased. The American woman's case was the only one found to support this possibility.
That's just my point: her case didn't support the possibility at all. In the end it was just another anecdote, because while the things that she attested to "seeing and hearing" occurring in the OR while she was 'dead' seemed suggestive, it ultimately fell down because the only verification of the details she claimed to have seen and heard was the memories of individuals on the OR team. Even her "knowledge" of the unlikely configuration of the 'electric toothbrush-like' saw they used during the op is no good as evidence because there are probably dozens of reasonable explanations (more likely ones than NDE by the current standard of knowledge) for her description of it matching the way it actually looked.

That was the most annoying thing about the whole damn program IMO: had they recorded the op while it was underway and it had confirmed what the OR team were saying as matching up with her NDE, we'd have proved (to my satisfaction at least) that she was aware of things and accumulating memories after neural activity had ceased, as it is all we have are people's memories of what they said and did during the op, and that's anecdote.
 
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Anonymous

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#46
I must agree that the doc was short on proof, but even so there were some scientists who seemed very keen on jumping on it as if it were proof.

I have a question - I have to say I found it very surprising that people could be revived after all neurological activity ceased. What is the difference between this and brain death, or are they one and the same? If not, then there is no link between no brain activity and actual death - which means that the whole premise is based upon "if we can't measure brain activity, then it isn't there" which would be incorrect. If they are, then at what point is one actually dead and unrevivable?

I've never been fully convinced by the recollections of the experiencer - despite being under anaesthetic, I still believe it possible the subconcious could hear and retain conversation in the theatre, and I'm pretty sure she's seen a bonesaw before on TV or wherever - whilst not consciously retaining what it looks like, I'm sure the subconcious would.
 
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Anonymous

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#47
If you definition of being alive is having measurable brain activity this would mean that creatures that are frozen die then come back to life-
one day I anticipate that humans will be freezable too-
probably using nanotech support-
and brain activity will regularly cease while the human body is stored - perhaps during interstellar flight.
After all, it is not necessary to use every neuron and every synapse and every microtubule in the brain at once to complete every thought-
this doesn't mean that the parts that are not used are dead.
 

rynner2

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#50
Crossing over
Those near death recall
experiences on the 'other side.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By JAMIE KLINGER-KREBS June 5, 2003



After passing away for approximately a minute and a half, Larry Uebele recalls seeing a magnificent light - a light so strong that mere words just can’t describe it.

"All I remember at first was seeing a long, dark, tubular tunnel. Then I began to see a light, a magnificent light, it was like the sun coming up on the horizon it was so bright - it hurt my eyes," he recalls.

Uebele, a 45-year-old Pewaukee resident, believes he encountered a near death experience one afternoon after he inadvertently drove his motorcycle, which he had just purchased that morning, into a telephone pole at age 20. He believes he was so close to death following the accident that he crossed over to a place between this life and the next. "This life we lead here is so short, it’s just the blink of an eye and there’s nothing I can say to comprehend that feeling I had when I was there, it was just fantastic."

Prior to his accident, Uebele explains, he wasn’t an incredibly religious man, but due to his experience he says his faith in "the big man upstairs" changed dramatically. "God could have me twice now if he wanted me," he laughs, "but I think I was sent back here to tell my story and by doing that I hope I can help others who may have had similar experiences."

Though many are skeptical over near death experiences (or NDEs as they are often called), many others are convinced that they are very real and can happen to anyone, anywhere. Rita Bressler, a 70-year-old Milwaukee resident, is a member of The International Association for Near-Death Studies (IANDS). Based in East Windsor Hill, Conn., IANDS is an informational and networking group focused on the field of near-death studies.

"NDEs are received much better now than they have been in the past," says Bressler, who has been a facilitator of an NDE support group for seven years. "I think people are more willing now than they used to be to accept that there’s something else out there, but there’s still much skepticism that exists."

According to IANDS, NDEs have occurred for thousands of years. Major studies indicate that 35-40 percent of people who come close to death may later report an NDE. It is not known whether the other 60-65 percent do not have an NDE, have one but do not remember, or choose not to discuss it. According to a Gallup study conducted in 1982, in the United States alone between eight and 13 million adults have had an NDE.

Although most people who have come close to death say they remember nothing, a third or more may later report that "something happened."

Bressler’s NDE occurred in 1968 on an afternoon where she recalls she felt tired after a long day’s work. "I was going to teach my daughters how to dive that afternoon, but I just remember feeling totally exhausted and so I laid down for a nap."

Four hours later a rescue squad would be at the Bressler home. "What happened to me was ‘syndrome-like,’ I began to feel sharp pains in my stomach, unlike anything I had ever felt before and I had bone-racking chills and a terrible migraine headache. Some time later I knew I was beginning to pass when I began to feel my own blood coursing through my veins. Suddenly the pain began to stop and I remember my husband calling the rescue squad.

"As you’re dying your consciousness expands," continues Bressler. "I couldn’t talk at all, but I remember my brain was more alert than I have ever remembered in my entire life. Then suddenly I was out of my body, I could see my husband in the kitchen and I began to fight like a bansheebecause I knew I didn’t want to go."

Then suddenly Bressler recalls seeing an "indescribable light, one thousand times more beautiful than anyone could imagine. "It was completely beyond this realm and then I began to see a quick life review and I saw the children I had fought so furiously to stay and protect suddenly looked different, I just had a knowing sense that God would take care of everything and so I fell into the light and I just knew I was in God’s presence."

When she awoke in the hospital a short time later, Bressler admits all she wanted to do was go back to the place she had just been. "It was just such a shock and I was confused and trying to figure out the place that I had just been so I didn’t tell a soul about what happened."

Bressler remained in the hospital for two weeks suffering from an exhausting, nearly fatal bout with the flu. She says the experience "changed her life forever."

Like many who have encountered a similar experience, Bressler says she became extremely spiritual. She explains that those who experience NDEs oftentimes come out of it with a "knowing sense." Though not a psychic she says there are times when she just knows things. "Once you’ve been to the other side, it just seems you have a higher knowledge," she explains.

Hence, this is where support groups like that which Bressler hosts out of her Milwaukee condo once a month come in handy. "We’ve had people from all over the area, including Hartland and West Bend, attend our groups," she says. "We encourage open communication because many people are frightened by what has happened to them or they may not understand it."

Though 25-year-old Kate Edwards of New Berlin has never attended a support group, she admits she doesn’t often talk about her NDE, which occurred at the age of 15.

As a child, Edwards recalls that her Grandpa Barney taught her how to swim and the two shared many afternoons swimming together in the lake near their home. Some years later, after her grandfather had passed away, Edwards joined her high school swim team and taught swimming lessons at pools near her home.

"I was at a park that had a big pool and a ‘kiddie’ pool," Edwards recalls. "I was 15 then and I was walking between the pools and I’m not sure what happened, but a couple of boys started getting rowdy and I think I was stepping out of their way and I got pushed into the kiddie pool where it’s only like a foot deep. The doctors said later when I fell backwards, my body tilted so the first thing that impacted the concrete was the back of my head.

"All I remember next is I was suddenly sitting on the side of the pool. I could see everyone standing around me, but it wasn’t me. I felt real warm, too. I know it was summer, but it was a strange kind of warm, and the wind was rushing around me, so I could hear the commotion but there was the roar of that wind. Then the whole scene just kind of got sucked out in front of me and there was nothing. But I didn’t really look around to see nothing.... It was like shutting off a TV. And then Grandpa Barney was next to me. He was wearing a suit and tie, which was strange, because he only got dressed up for special occasions. He handed me a towel and told me to go back to the pool. The next thing I remember, I was in an ambulance and they were happy I was awake."

Edwards says her experience dramatically changed the way she now views death. "There’s just something more out there, something we don’t really understand. It’s something greater than us."
__________________________

Near Death Experience

Although no two NDEs seem identical, patterns of certain occurrences do become evident. The pattern (and any single experience) includes one or more of these things:

Feeling that the "self" has left the body and is hovering overhead. The person may later be able to describe who was where and what happened, sometimes in detail.

Moving through a dark space or tunnel.

Experiencing intensely powerful emotions, ranging from bliss to terror.

Encountering a light. It is usually described as golden or white and as being magnetic and loving. Occasionally it is perceived as a reflection of the fires of hell.

Receiving some variant of the message "It is not yet your time."

Meeting others, who may be deceased loved ones, recognized from life or not, sacred beings, unidentified entities and/or "beings of light" sometimes symbols from one’s own or other religious traditions.

A life review, seeing and re-experiencing major and trivial events of one’s life, sometimes from the perspective of the other people involved and coming to some conclusion about the adequacy of that life and what changes are needed.

Having a sense of understanding everything, of knowing how the universe works.

Reaching a boundary - a cliff, fence, water, some kind of barrier that may not be crossed if one is to return to life.

In some cases, entering a city or library.

Rarely, receiving previously unknown information about one’s life-e.g., adoption or hidden parentage, deceased siblings.

Decision to return may be voluntary or involuntary. If voluntary, usually associated with unfinished responsibilities.

Returning to the body.
http://www.gmtoday.com/content/LSW/2003/May/66.asp
 
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FraterLibre

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#52
No Big Deal

It's all really no big deal if one recalls, and really grasps, that All is One, No Separation.
 

brianellwood

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#53
Is it an Indian yogic belief that consciousness resides in every cell of the body and not just the brain? Presumably all your cells don't die together at the point when brain rythms cease (ie clinical death) . Could this have some bearing on things if true?
 
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FraterLibre

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#54
In Zen

In Zen, as All is One, No Separation is possible, so isolating a locality for consciousness is but a conceit, and is futile on a larger scale. In other words, there is only Consciousness, and it is Cosmic. Yes, it exists in every cell, every atom of the Universe, which is the Tao of course. lol

In this sense it is not surprising that those who have experienced body death can often report, if the body is revived, awareness from elsewhere, even from elsewhen. It's like condensing Cosmic Consciousness into personal vials, or containers.

And no, I'm not involved with Heaven's Gate. My containers are all Tupperware. (burp)
 

rynner2

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#55
NDE experiencers form support group
Hart said he didn't talk to his ex-wife about what he went through until after they divorced. And he still hasn't talked about his experience with his daughter, seven years after a devastating car accident launched his life-altering journey.

"Initially, it was a deeply personal event that was outside of every experience I had ever had, and I was reluctant to mention it, fearing the reaction," Hart said. "After awhile, I came to rely on my intuition, and it made very clear when and how I was to share."

Science can't explain the near-death phenomenon, and the things experiencers glean about life and death sometimes clash with their religious upbringings, making it difficult to discuss.

"You have this wonderful thing happen, and you want to tell people," said support-group member Nancy Harding of Orange County. "So you do, and your family says, 'You need therapy.' Then the doctor tells you, 'You need meds.' Then the preacher tells you, 'You're going to hell.' Some people wish they'd never had it."

But not Harding, Dix or Hart. In a series of interviews, all three said their lives improved immeasurably after coming back from the dead.
...
At a recent meeting, Harding talked about why she doesn't tell hospice patients about her brush with the afterlife.

Though it brought her solace, she worries that her description of life after death might conflict with the religious beliefs patients rely on for comfort.

"If they're happy with their religion, you don't tell them," Harding said.
....
Hart said he'd always expected that when he died, he'd see a bearded man in a flowing robe. Instead, he saw what he can describe only as a river full of sparkling drops. He knew at once he belonged there.

"That is my perfect place of being," said Hart, who works in a professional-level job for a utility provider. "I came back kicking and screaming."

Back in this reality, Hart has drawn strength from the river. Each drop represents a human experience, he says. And the drops together represent the common connection of all people--and the source of all knowledge.

"It is the mind of God," Hart said of the river.
....
P.M.H. Atwater has studied more than 3,000 experiencers. Of that group, she said, two-thirds left their previous religious affiliation behind--if they had one.

"Make no mistake, though," Atwater said in a recent e-mail exchange. "Experiencers come back head over heels in love with God and devoted to the sacred--whether that be in a church setting, in a self-help study group, quietly by themselves, or in taking on a role of some kind that honors the God in all of us and the power of spirituality."
 
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FraterLibre

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#56
Science is a Method, Not a Body of Knowledge

"...Science can't explain the near-death phenomenon, and the things experiencers glean about life and death sometimes clash with their religious upbringings, making it difficult to discuss..."

This is nonsense. Science interrogates reality. If NDE's are part of reality then science can and should interrogate them as well. Science is a method of inquiry, nothing more. It is not a body of knowledge, which too many people either think or claim. It is simply one of many methods of asking the world what is going on, what is happpening and how and sometimes why.

NDE is an EXPERIENCE. We do not know the cause in all cases, nor the way it manifests in the mind-body interface. Unless and until we come up with a method of examining such things, we'll never know.

Those who claim to know via experience are making the subjective mistake of equating experience with reality. Anyone who's been drunk or in love, been poisoned or had a fever, knows this isn't right.

As to religion, is predisposes a certain interpretation. No surprise there. Any given person's cultural and social conditioning will make such subjective interpretations impossible to avoid, and unsurprising when they occur.
 

taras

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#57
I thought this idea was so mad it had to be granted the vast sums of money they were asking..! Brilliant, I hope it works! (They were discussing this at the Edinburgh Science Festival earlier this year, so I was talking about it with some people I know. We all thought the whole "placing a card on the patient's head" thing was great :) )
 

TheOrigDesperado

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#58
There are two major problems that the scientists need to work on - the "when" and the "how long".

In other words, when did the actual experience take place and how long - in real terms - did it last?

For instance, if a person "dies" for 45 minutes, and has no discernible brain function during that time, and experiences NDE, how does anyone know that they did not experience that NDE immediately before or immediately after lack of brain function?

And who's to say that NDE cannot be experienced so fast so as not to register on medical equipment. It's a fact that the entire life of a person can flash "infront of their eyes" in a fraction of a second. Say, for the sake of argument, the brain only requires 1/100th of a second to experience the full NDE. Would this be enough to register on monitoring equipment attached to the brain? - I doubt it.

Also, it's been admitted that monitoring equipment may well not be sensitive enough to pick up activity deep in the brain.

I don't really know how these issues are best addressed, but in my mind there are major stumbling blocks to accepting this phenomenon at face value.
 
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FraterLibre

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#59
Holographic

For the entire life to flash in an instant, it'd have to be stored holographically and thus accessible in a non-linear fashion. No sequence, just totality.

Now, having said this, I'd also say that if the human brain can discern it, monitors can be built to discern it too.
 

TheOrigDesperado

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#60
Well, the machines that monitor brain activity record only electrical activity, not the actual nature of the thought process. This is discerned solely by the location of the activity. Therefore I suppose yes, a monitor sensitive enough to detect events of a minute timescale could be produced, but I doubt there'd be much call for it.

The last physical evidence of thought is electrical activity. How it then becomes what we perceive as sight, sound, feeling is into the realms of consciousness itself, which is about as far away from being unravelled as it ever was. We can certainly build machines to record brain function down to a miniscule level, but until we understand consciousness - which may not be possible even in theory - then that activity remains simple pulses of electricity.

Personally, on balance of evidence, I'd be inclined to believe that consciousness does survive after death of the body, but it's a close call. Evidence on either side of the fence could sway my opinion.
 
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