Newly Discovered: Animal Fossils

Mythopoeika

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OK, not a fossil, but a creature that is 40,000 years old has been brought back to life (reminds me of 'The Thing'):
https://gizmodo.com/russian-scientists-claim-to-have-resurrected-40-000-yea-1827923906

Russian Scientists Claim to Have Resurrected 40,000-Year-Old Worms Buried in Ice
A team of Russian scientists is lining themselves up to be the opening cast of a John Carpenter film. Earlier this month, in the journal Doklady Biological Sciences, they announced they had apparently discovered ancient nematode worms that were able to resurrect themselves after spending at least 32,000 years buried in permafrost. The discovery, if legitimate, would represent the longest-surviving return from the cold ever seen in a complex, multi-celled organism, dwarfing even the tardigrade.

The worms were found among more than 300 samples of frozen soil pulled from the Kolyma River Lowlands in Northeastern Siberia by the researchers. Two of the samples held the worms, with one from a buried squirrel burrow dating back 32,000 years and one from a glacier dating back 40,000 years.
Rest of article at link.
 
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hunck

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New Sauropod species found in Argentina

The area in which the fossils were found is unusual for dinosaurs as it would have been a desert with sporadic lakes in that era.

The remains came from three separate dinosaurs from the herbivorous group of sauropods, the best known of which are the Diplodocus and Brontosaurus. This new species has been named Lavocatisaurus agrioensis.

“We found most of the cranial bones: the snout, the jaws, a lot of teeth, also the bones that define the eye sockets for example and, in that way, we were able to create an almost complete reconstruction,” said Jose Luis Carballido, a researcher at the Egidio Feruglio museum and the national council of scientific investigations.

The remains belonged to an adult about 12 metres long, and two young of six to seven metres which lived around 110 million years ago.
 

Jim

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New Sauropod species found in Argentina

The area in which the fossils were found is unusual for dinosaurs as it would have been a desert with sporadic lakes in that era.
However it doesn't really surprise me. Reptiles have some excellent survival strategies. Deserts are strong holds for lizards, snakes and tortoises. Sauropods were reptilian in nature unlike many of the theropods.
 

Jim

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Naughty_Felid

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Makes sense since during the Devonian to Carboniferous periods giant arthropods and invertebrates of numerous kinds existed. An earthworm "Gippsland earthworm" still grows to > 3 meters in present day Australia.
Do you share a name?
 
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The sea urchin had an interesting history.

An amateur paleontologist has discovered a rare 66-million-year-old sea urchin on a beach in Denmark.

Peter Bennicke stumbled across the ancient creature while on a fossil hunt at white cliffs of Stevns Klint on the Island of Møn, a UNESCO World Heritage site, according to the Danish TV2 public broadcaster. He knew straight away that he had found something unique - not only because of its large size, but also because it contained clues as to what had happened to it.

"I could see it was a pretty large sea urchin, so I took it home to look at it more closely. That's when I saw that it had been bitten," Mr Bennicke said.

Judging by the teeth marks situated right on top of the fossil, the sea urchin survived an attack by a predator that came from above. One speculation is that the scars could have been caused by the jaws of the marine predator Mosasaurus. Mr Bennicke described it as his "best-ever find". "This happened 66 million years ago, and to think that I'm just standing here with it in my hand, visualising the drama that took place so far back," he said.

https://www.bbc.com/news/blogs-news-from-elsewhere-46513790
 

hunck

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This is worth a watch

Attenborough & The Giant Dinosaur

Tells the story of the largest dinosaur yet discovered, a new species of titanosaur, a plant eater living around 100 million years ago, found in Argentina. Virtually the whole skeleton was present, bones cast & reconstruction of the skeleton made. Lots of discoveries along the way. The size of the thing is incredible - estimated to have weighed around 70 tons & thought to be not a fully grown animal!

Available on iplayer for 29 days.
 

Swifty

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This is worth a watch

Attenborough & The Giant Dinosaur

Tells the story of the largest dinosaur yet discovered, a new species of titanosaur, a plant eater living around 100 million years ago, found in Argentina. Virtually the whole skeleton was present, bones cast & reconstruction of the skeleton made. Lots of discoveries along the way. The size of the thing is incredible - estimated to have weighed around 70 tons & thought to be not a fully grown animal!

Available on iplayer for 29 days.
Quality. Cheers hunck.
 

Comfortably Numb

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Jim

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It worked for me on post #96? Seems many of our furry friends characteristic's haven't changed from my read on it.
 

Comfortably Numb

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It worked for me on post #96?
That's what is perplexing..

I, almost religiously...:cool:.... 'preview' a post and check any URL is working.

For sure, that might have been an exception, however, it worked for your good self?

Post #96 no longer exists in original format and if anyone has a copy of the initial posting, would certainty be interesting for clarification.
 

Mungoman

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It worked for me on post #96? Seems many of our furry friends characteristic's haven't changed from my read on it.
In my teens, one of our working dogs who laboured under the name of Dickens would bounce on the spot if he found a snake in the paddocks. The feed at the time would've been knee high, so Dickens was clearing three feet or so, on the spot.

He would do this a number of times, then pounce, and on the bounce back, he would fling it, the snake, almost with a flick - over his shoulder. Invariably the snake would have a broken spine.

He got the name when, as a pup, he would run/work with his Mum and do this in the middle of a paddock.

We couldn't call him 'Bloody Hell', so Dickens it was, as in - what the dickens is that dog doing now.
 
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